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Gone for Good
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I'm surprised that a lot more survival minded people don't use dutch ovens. They are one of the things from the past that are so useful and easy to use. If the grid goes down for any length of time people will be rediscovering the useful dutch oven.

Here is a dutch oven site we like: http://papadutch.home.comcast.net/~papadutch/dutch-oven-recipes.htm

I hope your post gets more people thinking of using a dutch oven as a important survival prep.

Red
 

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Bush Walker
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so great! i remembered using one of these in scouts and started looking for one yesterday! - any suggestions? the price ranges from $$-$$$ - I just need an iron 5 qt. yeah?



also good posting up that recipe page - bookmark'd!
 

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Gone for Good
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We buy the LODGE brand a great Tennessee company for dutch ovens and all my cast iron cooking equipment. We use only the camp style dutch oven and own 4,6 and 8qt models. The recessed lid and legs make it great for cooking with out coals or charcoal at home or in the bush.We seem to use the 6qt most often. I see the 6 qt is up to $90 now. They sometimes have sales at their website. We have also picked up many cast iron items for a few bucks at garage sales. We sand blast and reseason the rusty ones.
http://www.lodgemfg.com/

Red

so great! i remembered using one of these in scouts and started looking for one yesterday! - any suggestions? the price ranges from $$-$$$ - I just need an iron 5 qt. yeah?



also good posting up that recipe page - bookmark'd!
 

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Deus exsisto laus
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I have a 12 inch Lodge Dutch oven I bought maybe 15 years ago, but never used. I have been cooking in it more and more in the last few months. I'm actually getting the hang of it! I have the iron tripod, the hooky thing ...lid lifter, I guess, and other accoutrement. The other day I tried an experiment. I had 9 pounds of hamburger I wanted to cook ,then put in freezer bags. Rather than heat up the house, I built a fire in the fire pit out back. However, this time, rather than use wood, I used leaves. I have 3 acres that are heavily wooded and had been raking and burning huge piles of leaves. I noticed that the leaf piles would smolder very hot for a day or two ,depending on the size of the pile. I raked up a pile about 6' x 4' and lit it up. I put about 4 pounds of ground beef in my D.O. and some seasonings, and about 2 cups of water. I put the lid on it, dug a D.O. shaped hole in the leaves and set the oven down in the hole. I raked some smoldering leaves over the top of the oven ,to the depth of about 1 foot. I left it and went about my business. A couple of hours later, it was thoroughly cooked, and I repeated the process till all the beef was cooked.I was pleased to find a used for the leaf piles , saves wood for another time. The more I use this D.O. the more uses I find for it ! I recommend them highly. BTW, I like how the guy in the video built a fire pit with those landscaping bricks. TP
 

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Gone for Good
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Texas Patriot that is a great use for leaves. We will be using your method on the next pot roast we cook. It sure gives a cheap and easy energy source for cooking.

Your experiment cooking with leaves may encourage a lot of people to dig out their idle dutch ovens and perfect their use. I'm wanting to try it on our favorite dutch oven desserts also.

Red
 

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I love dutch ovens. I used to cook with a dutch oven all the time. I mean from making biscuits to baking lasagna. A roast rose mary chicken is great. There is also a great bean recipe that you actually bury the pan in about a 2 foot hole for 24 hours with hot coals. Texas beans at their finest.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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I'm surprised that a lot more survival minded people don't use dutch ovens. They are one of the things from the past that are so useful and easy to use. If the grid goes down for any length of time people will be rediscovering the useful dutch oven.
It would seem to be a logical choice. But then again, so is reloading ammo, and few do that either.

I've used dutch ovens (and cast iron in general) for a long time, simply because I like the way the food turns out and I like traditional old style ways of doing things. I began collecting cast iron cookware and dutch ovens just because I liked them. It wasn't until I began using them that I saw their potential for survival.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I learned in the Scouts. One year as kids were asking for toys and other crap I asked for a dutch oven for Christmas. It is a 12" with the Boy Scout decal on the lid. It was shipped and got a crack, Lodge shipped another one free. So I ended up with 1 complete, and an extra lid. Not bad
 

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GrowingFromScratch.com
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We've got a couple D.O's for indoor use. Use them frequently. I figure I can rig a handle and tripod for hanging over a fire pit if need be.

The subject of cast iron cookware for survival cooking has come up now and then. The cast iron dutch oven I can see being useful because it's a big pot. But why are the skillets / pans such more more preferred than standard kitchen cookware? Is this mostly because of durability and heat retainment?
 

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Do you smell that?
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We have a 12" with legs. This one is made for cooking over coals. My wife won it in a raffle at a Gander Mountain grand reopening. I havent used it yet, but Im gonna break it out and put it to use.
 
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Wild Edibles Expert
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We've got a couple D.O's for indoor use. Use them frequently. I figure I can rig a handle and tripod for hanging over a fire pit if need be.

The subject of cast iron cookware for survival cooking has come up now and then. The cast iron dutch oven I can see being useful because it's a big pot. But why are the skillets / pans such more more preferred than standard kitchen cookware? Is this mostly because of durability and heat retainment?
I own about 100 pieces of cast iron cookware, including several dutch and camp ovens (the latter have legs and a top that can hold coals easily on top.) I buy them at flea markets, garge sales and recycle centers then rehabilitate them with electrolysis. Among the collection are dozens of skillets et ali.

Why cast iron? Hmmmm. It is very versatile, fancy kitchens to campfires. Durable. Inexpensive (and very green. One pan can last several generations so one is not contributing to the throw-away habit.) If seasoned properly (with lard in several layers) they are nonstick. They distribute heat nicely so there are few hot and cold spots. Sturdy. More so they can go into the oven with no problems with plastic or wooden handles being ruined. No chemicals to wear off. They even add a little iron to the diet, good for women. And if seasoned well, rarely if ever need to be washed.

That said, not all pans are created equal. My favorite pan is a 12 inch Griswold skillet around 70 years so that I got for a couple of dollars at a recycle center. While it is a collector's item worth about $40, it is simply a superior pan (particularly compared to a Lodge of the same size.) It is made of a fine grain cast iron, light actually -- half the weight of a Lodge. Very smooth surface. It was easy to clean and season. Cooks like a dream. I could use it in a campfire but I would use one of my lodge pans for that (think sports car vs delivery truck.) Wagner pans are also good as are some from the Orient. Some Oriental pans are excellent and some are crude slabs of iron.

All that mentioned, if one could have only one thing to cook with it would be a dutch oven. It can be an oven, a frying pan, a deep fryer and a boiler (folks who say don't boil water or cook acidic foods in cast iron do not have well-seasoned pans.)

I do have other pans in my kitchen and often cook for one to three dozen people. But most prize are my cast iron pans, then my copper pans and bowls. Then stainless steel. No aluminum in my kitchen, and I avoid enameled pans as they will chip.
 

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I decided to heat my house exclusively with wood this year so I bought a 7 quart DO by Lodge so I could cook on top of my wood stove. I didn't get the one with the legs and the recessed top for coals, but that is on my list of things to get. I have enjoyed cooking with mine this year and have made roasts, BBQ, chicken, stews etc. It slow cooks all day and has a much better consistency than that cooked in a crock pot. I like the fact that the Lodge cookware is pre seasoned and ready to go, right out of the box.

I love my Revere ware, but am slowly becoming a convert to good old cast iron. There is nothing like cornbread in a cast iron skillet!!
 

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D.O.'s are an excellent way to do meal prep even when the S hasn't HTF. We keep several different sizes ready and have stockpiled briquettes for that purpose.

They're a good "fourth leg" of our own SHTFcooking plan ("A" - Coleman gear, "B" - Fireplace, "C" - Propane Gear/BBQ and "D" - D.O's).
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I own about 100 pieces of cast iron cookware, including several dutch and camp ovens (the latter have legs and a top that can hold coals easily on top.) I buy them at flea markets, garge sales and recycle centers then rehabilitate them with electrolysis. Among the collection are dozens of skillets et ali.

Why cast iron? Hmmmm. It is very versatile, fancy kitchens to campfires. Durable. Inexpensive (and very green. One pan can last several generations so one is not contributing to the throw-away habit.) If seasoned properly (with lard in several layers) they are nonstick. They distribute heat nicely so there are few hot and cold spots. Sturdy. More so they can go into the oven with no problems with plastic or wooden handles being ruined. No chemical to wear off. They even add a little iron to the diet, good for women. And if seasoned well, rarely if ever need to be washed.

That said, not all pans are created equal. My favorite pan is a 12 inch Griswold skillet around 70 years so that I got for a couple of dollars at a recycle center. While it is a collector's item worth about $40, it simply a superior pan (particularly to a Lodge of the same size.) It is made of a fine grain cast iron, light actually -- half the weight of a Lodge. Very smooth surface. It was easy to clean and season. Cooks like a dream. I could use it in a campfire but I would use one of my lodge pans for that (think sports car vs delivery truck.) Wagner pans are also good as are some from the Orient. Some Oriental pans are excellent and some are crude slabs of iron.

All that mentioned, if one could have only one thing to cook with it would be a dutch oven. It can be an oven, a frying pan, a deep fryer and a boiler (folks who say don't boil water or cook acidic foods in cast iron do not have well-seasoned pans.)

I do have other pans in my kitchen and often cook for one to three dozen people. But most prize are my cast iron pans, then my copper pans and bowls. Then stainless steel. No aluminum in my kitchen, and I avoid enameled pans as they will chip.
Nice write-up!:thumb:
 
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