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Hunkerin' in the Bunker
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I'm sure everyone heard about the recent outbreak of tornadoes which devastated Eastern Ky last Friday. I've been offline for the last few days as the local grid recovers from the damage. My family myself and my close neighbors are all fine. Except for a 2" diameter limb impaling my camper, my property is undamaged.

For 3 hours before the storm, I was moving food, water, first aid supplies and candles from my camper to my grandmother's house in preparation. The storm struck and we all hunkered down as it sounded like the apocalypse was unleashed on my neighborhood. It passed, and we were fortunate to have received little damage. We found over the next hours and days that we were lucky...dumb lucky.

45 miles away is West Liberty a town I've been to dozens of times. There is no West Liberty now. It's gone. The courthouse, the restaurants, the police station, everything is gone. It looks like a nuke went off.

3 miles away is Hager Hill. Callista Church stood for 50 years. Now all that's left is the basement. Pieces of metal roofing are wrapped onto power lines. 2 miles away from my house, a brick warehouse is partially collapsed, piles of brick on the road. I can walk down the road 10 minutes and see a mountainside stripped bare of its trees like a picture of Tunguska. It's unreal.

We're all picking up the pieces here. Some of my neighbors still haven't heard from friends and family living in West Liberty and Salyersville. It really hit the fan here, guys. I've lived in this area nearly all my life, and I've never seen something like this. No one has.

"Experts" say this was an anomaly. A fluke. They say this was the storm that wasn't supposed to have happened. Hell, old timers here say that this sort of thing doesn't happen. Ever. Tornadoes here are NOT F3's. Storms don't drop 70 tornadoes on this part of the country. As terrible as it all is, worse is the realization that things are changing. This is only the beginning, and things will get much worse. I survived this thing when so many didn't. I'm stepping up my preps, and wondering what will happen next. God help the people suffering in the wake of this Hell. And God bless you all.
 

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Glad to hear that your family and you are safe. I recommend using some of your preps to help families that were not so lucky. God Bless.
 

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Wannabe Mountain Hermit
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Thank goodness you and your family made it. Praying for everyone in your area. Stay safe.
 

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From a person who has lived in MS and AL all of her life, and who grew up with tornadoes as a fact of life... my sympathies and prayers go out to your community as they rebuild.

As the result of a similar "swarm" of tornadoes here (April 27, 2011) many buildings and schools are now being rebuilt with reinforced areas which will provide adequate protection the next time it happens (and it will...sooner or later).

again... good luck to you and yours... and I'm glad to hear your immediate family came through relatively unscathed.
 

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Like SurvivorGirlAL I was here for the April 27th storms last year too. I have been in Bama all my life so I understand what you are going through. Thankfully you are okay. Our storms followed "old tornado paths" and apparently everything lined up just right. Our weather has been much better since (until last week when some smaller tornadoes hit) I hope you can get out and help those around you. Just like the majority of SHTF scenarios you can outreach and open peoples eyes. I am glad you are okay! I hope all goes well for you! Apparently a nuclear power plant up there was hit by a tornado as well and it was bad ... very bad. You will probably be amazed to see your community come together and help each other out. I already have a trip planned for northeastern KY in about 2 weeks so hopefully I can help some too.

Good Luck!
Good Preps!
 

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Learning

Glad you and yours are okay.

For 3 hours before the storm, I was moving food, water, first aid supplies and candles from my camper to my grandmother's house in preparation....
I lurk around here to learn. Curious why it took so long (3 hours) to move stuff inside. Is your camper that big or do you have a lot of candle power? Seriously though, was it just the volume that took so long, organization, containers? What insights can you share for me to learn from.

If you had needed to move it back out to the camper after the storm to bug out would it have taken another three hours?
 

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I am a woman. :o)
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'extreme' might have meant that he moved the supplies in, then three hours later it struck, like: I moved the stuff inside at noon, then at 3 o'clock the storm landed.
 

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I too was one of the lucky ones. I didn't know what was going on as my husband and I hid in our basement shelter (closet under the stairs). We heard some movement and things crashing around as the lights flickered.

However we had no real damage. The crashing noises turned out to be one of our cats that was throwing books off our bookshelves (he likes to do that when he wants attention).

You have my sincere prayers.
 

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1974...Jefferson County in southeastern Indiana...50 dead and 400 injured. I was there.:eek: If the tornado had hit 1 hour earlier...it would have wiped out half of an entire generation. The junior and high schools were flattened. It was awful!!! And it could have been worse.

Glad you and your family are ok.:thumb:
 

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Hunkerin' in the Bunker
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Discussion Starter #15
Glad you and yours are okay.



I lurk around here to learn. Curious why it took so long (3 hours) to move stuff inside. Is your camper that big or do you have a lot of candle power? Seriously though, was it just the volume that took so long, organization, containers? What insights can you share for me to learn from.

If you had needed to move it back out to the camper after the storm to bug out would it have taken another three hours?
I watched the weather channel for a couple hours, until I determined that there was indeed a chance that we would get severe weather. This was about 5 hours before the storm actually hit. I moved mine and my fiancee's BOB's and a first aid kit to my grandmother's house, as we weren't about to ride out a potential tornado in a camper.

3 hours before the storm hit, we were in my grandmother's house watching the weather channel and CNN on 2 different TV's a this point, the storm was moving through central KY, and dropping tornadoes. At this point, I knew we were in for it, so we went to my camper, and moved into the house; food, bottled water, a very large medic kit, weapons, candles and flashlights. I changed into BDUs, and put on my ALICE web gear with canteens, IFAKs, my Kabar, and everything I consider to be my "DEFCON 5" Kit.

I told my brother and his wife (who live in a concrete apartment building about 6 miles away) to stay alert, and hunker down in the bathroom if they get hit. I made plans with my fiancee and my grandmother regarding where they should take cover if we were to get hit, and warned my neighbors of the impending storm, and got them to bring their dog into their house. I double-checked the batteries in my NOAA weather radio and my handheld CB radio.

About an hour before it hit, the sky began looking very strange. Having lived in Texas 3 years, I recognized the weird "feel" in the air, and the menacing clouds. It had been sunny all day, but now it was darkening, and actually getting a few degrees warmer. A few minutes later, a report came out that West Liberty was destroyed and Salyersville was being hit. As the storm moved in, it began to rain, and the wind picked up, with frequent lightning. The power began to flicker. I made sure everyone had a flashlight and a lighter. My fiancee had the first aid kit close, and I was wearing my web gear and a helmet. I got my grandmother to lay underneath a heavy coffee table, and surround herself with cushions, and my fiancee to lay in the floor, where I turned a sofa over on top of her to form an ad-hoc shelter. I got in a corner, and reclined a lazyboy over my head until it passed.

The tornado touched down a mile up the road, and did severe damage to houses in the area. Our camper was pretty much fine, and my grandmother's house was unharmed. I checked on the neighbors, and walked around the area to make sure no gas lines or power lines were damaged then tried to get info over the CB. That's pretty much my experience during the storm. Maybe I made mistakes, maybe I did everything right, I don't know. Perhaps some here can take something away from my experience. I just wanted to share my preparations for the storm, and my account of what happened.
 

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democrats = Hydra
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glad you ok.
great practice for the next emergency. wonder how many of your neighbors will now join the prep squad?

My pastor spent some time in Harlan County when younger. when growing up he was told they never got tornados there since it was on a plateau...then they had ten from 1973-1977. wow. had something changed? or just better recording?
(source: http://www.homefacts.com/tornadoes/Kentucky/Harlan-County/Evarts.html)
 
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