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I have a case of mandarin oranges which I bought at Save A Lot. The inside of the cans have that characteristic patchy surface that you see om galvanized sheet metal. Is,nt this bad for food storage? Isn't tnere some zinc used in that process? The brand name is Shelby's distributed by Alliance Foods of Coldwater, Mich.:eek:
 

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zinc

The cans are usually coated over the metal, probably should not be down to base metal or plating. I assume the juice is somewhat acidic which would tend to dissolve more metal than a PH neutral liquid. maybe you got a bad batch. If it was galvanized then its zinc you are talking about as a coating, maybe you could save on the cost of your multivitamin, ha. People have been collecting rain water off of galvanized metal roofs for over a hundred years, so I am not too worried about the simple fact there might be zinc. Water coolers, and lost of water storage tanks were made of galvanized steel before the popularity and cheaper cost of plastic. Hmmm, or maybe that is what is wrong with all of us, our grand parents drank that water, yikes. I would examine them to see if it looks like someone shipped a lot of cans without the coating.
 

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I have a case of mandarin oranges which I bought at Save A Lot. The inside of the cans have that characteristic patchy surface that you see om galvanized sheet metal. Is,nt this bad for food storage? Isn't tnere some zinc used in that process? The brand name is Shelby's distributed by Alliance Foods of Coldwater, Mich.:eek:
Galvanizing is adding a thin layer of zinc to steel. I don't think it likely you have any galvanized food cans, maybe something that mimics the appearance.
 

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galvinising makes the hull of the can stonger if not it would be just like havin food stored in a steel popcan wouldent be as strong if dropped it would dent lot easier
 

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Hmmm, I just read my own post, and I am confused, thus are the problems with responding on line. Sooo, here I go again, maybe this time I will make more sense..

Most metal cans have a thin film, maybe enamel, maybe its a plastic film over the inside surface. I would be surprised to find the can was bare galvanized steel. I suspect someone may have shipped a batch of cans without that thin film over the inside of the can. We do call them tin cans but due to the cost of tin, they are surely coated with something different. One of the reasons for the tin originally is that besides being corrosion resistant it allowed the lids to be soldered on, with LEAD.

While I don't believe it is bare galvanized (zinc), I would not be too worried about, say drinking water that has simply been in a galvanized container. Maybe that makes my zinc comment more understandable.

If you had a slightly acidic fluid in a galvanized container, more zinc might be in the fluid, it is a solubility problem.
 

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Try the test

If you have a meter (volt ohm meter), you can test for electrical continuity between the inside of the can to the outside. I am pretty sure all the cans should have the film coating. I just tested a few cans we opened today, all had the film (an open circuit measured on the resistance scale). Some cans looked like bare metal inside but measured an open circuit, so the film was there. If the film was not there, I would probably take the rest of the cans back, and ask for a refund or different lot. I think we can guess where the cans are coming from these days, somebody may have had a bad day at the can factory. Better safe than sorry, no sense you having a bad day as well.
 

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The stuff lining the insides of canned food

That material is a plastic which contains a compound known as Bisphenol A.

I wrote a response to a thread that was started back in July 2008 about it.

Here is the link to that post.

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?p=212883#post212883

It's long and informative.

Personally, if I can avoid it, I don't it eat from canned food anymore. Especially over the past five years, as more and more people have studied it, Bisphenol A appears to have more and more negative side-effects being associated with it. There's a lot of good evidence that you don't want infants and children exposed to it, not so much thus far with adults. Perhaps that will change, who knows.

-Herschel
 

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The Libby's brand sold at Sav-a-Lot are in galvanized cans as well. Not sure if it is coated or not, if it is then it's a clear coating.

If S does hit the F on a massive scale, a little Zinc will be the last thing I'm worried about.
 
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