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Whippersnapper
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I was musing the benefits and skills of Marksmanship and shooting and how the principles can and do apply to life in general having tried to explain this to a non shooting firend; how shooting when i was growing up developed many valuble skills that have worked as a metaphor for other aspects of life...
I love shooting, hunting, marksmanship etc; for me it is a fantastic escape, almost a 'meditation' for want of a better word.

so i came up with this list as a list of rules for making the perfect shot(s);

• Create calm where none exists.
• Nothing matters except everything, and the target.
• Become self-aware to the smallest detail; your muscles, your breaths, your heart and your thoughts.
• Become immovable, become solid. Ensure you have a sure stance to build from.
• If you are uncomfortable, become comfortable.
• Mastery comes from loving what you do, living what you do and practicing what you do.
• The world is stubborn; it will not change for you- learn to make it work for you instead.
• Be discerning in every act, it is impossible to undo the results.

Think on them and how they might apply to the way you conduct your life, or as skills to draw from.

What do you think?
 

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Warrior Trying tobe Civil
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GENT, my uncle would have agreed with your principles to the 'T', as he also lived them. My uncle, fortunately, never found himself in combat, for which some of your principles I used some of the time, but most I didn't use, most of the time......it takes a different mindset, although there are exception.

However it is apparent you have given some thorough thought to develop your principles and I commend you.

Best Regards......Eagle Six
 

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I was lucky enough to grow up in a pro shooting area. Living on a working farm helped too. My dad and all my uncles were hunters. Had my first BB gun at 6 and my first shotgun at 10. Was introduced to competitive shooting ,collecting and gun shows in my early teens.
After college ,ended up in a LEO position. Worked robbery/stakeout in a major US city and as a police academy firearms instructor. Attended different shooter /instructor schools , armorers schools and was selected to attend a summer LEO armorers school at Murray State College.
I"m now retired and looking to return to Murray State College in another year or so and attend their full blown gunsmithing school.

Guess you could say I'm a bit of a gun person................
 

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I don't know if I agree with your individual principles completely but do agree that shooting is at minimum a life skill. It is a combination of a discipline and a lifestyle. The actual act combines a complete effort by the subconscious mind, conscious mind and entire body to have an effect on a distant target that you cannot control by repeating a set of conscious and subconscious physical actions on a mechanical object that is not connected to the target that you want to effect.

Those of us that have grown up with firearms know that they are a means of training us on discipline and concentration with the rewards of a job well done. They are also a right of passage through life from your first bb gun to your first rifle.
 
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