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What is going to have the longest shelf life? 6 cans of dried beans that I buy from LDS online store, or bulk dried beans that I properly pack in good mylar, then put in a steel container of some sort?
 

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Assuming your 7mm mylar has no pinholes and you seal it properly with the correct amount of fresh oxygen absorber inside, they should both last approximately as well. Metal cans are the gold standard for long-term storage, though. Mylar is the choice for self-packaging for most only because of the cost of a can sealer plus the difficulty of buying less than truckloads of metal cans, the cost, and the storage space issue for pallets of cans.

If you aren't going to realize substantial savings by do-it-yourself, and the LDS have whatever it is in cans, I'd consider going with their canned beans. They have a limited product selection, though, so that can be another factor in the decision.

This is a people's mileage may vary question. Evaluate your own circumstances and needs.
 

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no matter what you you store provisions in, if you can't keep it below 18-14c your provisions will not years, you will lucky to keep them from 3-14 days... regardless containers they are kept in..when you have to clean out cupboards full of stuff between $500-2,500 your 3+ years supply of food will have to be replaced at some point..

when you have constant temp past 36c with med-high humidity nothing lasts in that scenario sad to say even grans to keep due pestilence picked up in the growth and harvest stages... which lay dormant for month's to years until the right conditions are met for incubation.....

with soups and stews cooked then frozen is best with caveat to fish and all poultry no more than 3-6 month's

Whilst canning is great and all unless you have climate controlled rooms or walk-in fridge/-freezers to use long term storage comes the issue heat kills cans..
 

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The OP said nothing about having only hot storage space.

Beans packed in metal cans or good mylar with oxygen absorbers have an expected shelf life of 10 years stored at a 70ºF/21ºC normal climate controlled household temperature, not anything as ridiculous as 3-14 days. It's true that the same beans stored under 14ºC/60ºF would have a shelf life of 20 years, but 10 is still a perfectly functional storage life allowing for a reasonably long rotation.

It's also true the same beans are going to keep only 2 years at 36ºC/97ºF and grains maybe only 3, but that's why sane preppers don't store food at such temperatures.

However, no grains dried to the proper moisture content and stored in impervious packaging with oxygen absorbers suffer from pestilence in storage. In such packaging, all insect life stages, adults, larvae, and eggs, are killed with 2 weeks maximum and there is no mold or similar problem when storing grains dried to the proper moisture content for long-term storage. In fact, properly dried and packaged hard grains will last for 12 years in perfect condition at 70ºF/21ºC.

And as for conventionally canned foods, you certainly do not need walk-in freezers to keep canned fish for 5 to 7 years or better, and the same for canned meats and a number of canned soups/stews.

None of us will deny low temps extend storage life for just about anything, but one can certainly do long-term storage at normal household temps. Claiming nothing will last more than 3-14 days or that everyone will ordinarily have to throw out hundreds/thousands of dollars of their storage food every 3 years is just as much nonsense as expecting food to store for 30 years in a hot attic.

If you have nowhere to store dry goods that isn't constantly above 36ºC with high humidity, then you do indeed have limited storage options, and I am sorry for you. Human survival itself becomes a problem under that combination, let alone food storage. Even canned goods have to be specially processed at a higher total heat load to avoid problems such as flat-sour in such tropical climates, but such conditions are hardly the norm for most of us. However, again, the OP's original question had nothing to do with storage temperature, just whether mylar or cans would give a longer shelf life in the same storage conditions, so your long and somewhat inaccurate diatribe on short shelf life/extreme temperatures really belongs in a different thread.
 

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apply to a home that gets to 36-50c.. in the shade

cooler the spaces get the longer stuff lasts...

Noting the 3-14 days applies hot weather not average winter weather.. 21c and below..

The reason I chose 18-14c or below because I would want the food stores to last the longest sadly the hotter it gets in my experience the shorter shelf life gets whether you are canning yourself or buying it already canned..

though 1 salient point I always make home cooked and frozen food will last upwards of 24 months with exception to seafood and poultry..

Having stuff last 7-10 years is a great goal however unless you have reserve power options to maintain 20+kw gen set you aren't going to last long

with daily consumption as it was if you live within a area that suffers natural disasters at a frequent rate you may need to think long without assistance..

I plan to have enough for a min of 3-5 years 7-10 years most likely not be an option for most as there will some form of feasible Gov entity in place once the shtf stops
 

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It's called a can sealer, you can google some up. Even manual ones are pricey, but getting cans delivered affordably in reasonable quantities can be a bigger issue since it's ongoing versus a one-time purchase.

You used to be able to bring your own food to LDS food storage centers and use their can sealer set up, but the government harassed them into closing those down in the interests of our "food safety."
 

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Yeah when I said "a good way" to seal up #10 cans at home I meant considering price. Of course I can always buy a canning machine that costs thousands of dollars.

Mylar bags are pretty inexpensive.
 

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Mylar bags are pretty inexpensive.
Inexpensive, easy to use, and an ample supply stores in a small space. Which is why that is what it is generally recommended to use here in spite of metal cans being more sturdy and so less subject to the occasional failure and less likely to be damaged.

Everything in life is a trade off, and we can't all be bunkerbusters. :(

If you buy good-quality heavy mylar bags, store them flat until use, handle them gently when filling, and provide them with a protective container in storage, they will perform very nearly as well as metal cans.
 

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Whilst we can survive past 50c, everything we EAT starts to fail past a constant 36+c what might might last for month's, years or decades might see as little as 3-14 days or less when the temp keeps rising stuff keeps failing no matter the storage solution it is stored in..

you can have thousands in food being thrown out because of the heat..

I like the option of 20 years+ worth of food however as a practical person nothing lasts that long unless you have a constant cold zone of 12c or lower..

i'd say in a disaster scenario, you are looking at 3-5 years at minimum maximum before restock and gov aid gets to you, if you are forecasting the scenario of 7-10 years at this point you be farming to a degree that is the cold hard fact of the scenario as some food might have a 12-18 shelf life when frozen however some other on't has 3-6 month in its raw state.. some might have a 24 month after cooking some might only last 6-9 month's after cooking..
 

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My wife and I were reorganizing our long term food storage this morning. In 2012 we put white rice and beans in empty liter soda bottles without o2 absorbers. The beans and rice look like the day we put it in the bottles in 2012. We store them in our basement, it’s always cool and dark.
 
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