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SI vis pacem,para bellum
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Discussion Starter #1
My question is what type of stone, is preferable oil or water?
I was looking at a water stone on line, one side was 1000 the other was 6000.
Does that sound like a good choice, for sharpening knives? I have e an oil stone, I don't even remember where I got it from. One side is coarser than the other, I have no idea what the grit is. I have used it this last week, on 4 different Knives, I was able to improve the cutting edge on all of them. I wish
it was bigger, would make life a little easier. So to sum it up, what kind of stone would you suggest. Or any other techniques or sharpeners, that you feel are a good choice?
 

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SI vis pacem,para bellum
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Discussion Starter #7
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Croc stick for me.

I am not great at sharpening knives with a flat stone, but it is super easy and fast with a Croc stick.

Mine is by Lansky.

https://www.amazon.com/Lansky-8-Ceramic-Sharp-Stick/dp/B000B8FW0O


Here is another brand.

https://www.amazon.com/Cooks-Standa...ansky+sharpening+stick&qid=1595288780&sr=8-63
I bought a product from Lansky, I was not impressed with it.
https://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/Deluxe-Lansky-Sharpening-System-P102C57.aspx
 

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First things first, if you use oil on a sharpening stone, water will no longer work with it. So don’t make that decision without some consideration…

So why use oil in the first place?

Generally stones used with oil hold their flatness better, but also load up faster. They will have to be cleaned more often than their counterpart water stones. Additionally, stones used with oil tend to sharpen slower.

Oil should always be used with a whetstone that oil has already been used on. Usually, you want to use oil with an India or natural Arkansas stone.

You should never use oil with a Japanese water stone, instead you should submerge the Japanese water stone in water until the stone stops bubbling.

Any stone made out of aluminum oxide, silicon carbine, or novaculite can be used with oil.

Water should be used on diamond stones (which can also be used dry), most synthetic (man-made) whetstones, ceramic stones, and Japanese water stones.

On the other hand, oil should be used on Arkansas stones and Norton India stones. These India stones are pre-soaked in oil, so trying to use water with them would be ineffective.

Additionally, if you’re a camper or hiker who sharpens his stones while in the field, I would recommend using a water stone so you won’t have to carry oil with you.

ROCK6
 

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SI vis pacem,para bellum
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Discussion Starter #9
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First things first, if you use oil on a sharpening stone, water will no longer work with it. So don’t make that decision without some consideration…

So why use oil in the first place?

Generally stones used with oil hold their flatness better, but also load up faster. They will have to be cleaned more often than their counterpart water stones. Additionally, stones used with oil tend to sharpen slower.

Oil should always be used with a whetstone that oil has already been used on. Usually, you want to use oil with an India or natural Arkansas stone.

You should never use oil with a Japanese water stone, instead you should submerge the Japanese water stone in water until the stone stops bubbling.

Any stone made out of aluminum oxide, silicon carbine, or novaculite can be used with oil.

Water should be used on diamond stones (which can also be used dry), most synthetic (man-made) whetstones, ceramic stones, and Japanese water stones.

On the other hand, oil should be used on Arkansas stones and Norton India stones. These India stones are pre-soaked in oil, so trying to use water with them would be ineffective.

Additionally, if you’re a camper or hiker who sharpens his stones while in the field, I would recommend using a water stone so you won’t have to carry oil with you.

ROCK6
I was under the impression, that oil stones sharpened slower. And water stones, were quicker. What do you think of the one I showed above?
 

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Biologist
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I got big into sharpening back in the day, invested in a nice set of Japanese water stones. They take a while but deliver a superior result.
 

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I was under the impression, that oil stones sharpened slower. And water stones, were quicker. What do you think of the one I showed above?
Oiled stones are a little slower and since they often load up faster, you may need to clean them more often. I just prefer the Japanese water stones as water is simpler to use in the filed, where I used ceramic or diamond more often. Yeah, the Lansky is a good system; as with most sharpening systems, consistent, even grinds take time and patience.

When I pull out the bench stones, it's more for therapeutic reasons than just sharpening:D:

The big take-away is that if your stone isn't already loaded with oil, make the the decision before using oil or water as it's really hard to go from using oil to water.

ROCK6
 

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I have a small professional sharpening business and have some input. I was originally going to go the way of the Japanese whet stone sharpening method but found it to be too time-intensive with most customer knives. They were generally so dull that the Japanese stones did nothing in the initial grits. I ended up with a sharpening system similar to the Edge Pro and use Edge Pro stones. It cut my sharpening time by 75%. I have stones that range from 150 grit to 1000, plus a leather strop. The knives come out looking beautiful and super sharp but the sharpening system is somewhat cost prohibitive for the average user. I look at sharpening systems like I look at reloading equipment. If you are going to use it a little, its not worth it. If you will use it a lot, it will pay off.
 

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i find myself using the spyderco ceramic stones and the diamond more lately cause there fast and easy and they work great.5 strokes and your done the new technology works esp when skinning elk or deer in the field those diamond pocket sticks work wonders with just a few strokes love it.
 

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I have a small professional sharpening business and have some input. I was originally going to go the way of the Japanese whet stone sharpening method but found it to be too time-intensive with most customer knives. They were generally so dull that the Japanese stones did nothing in the initial grits. I ended up with a sharpening system similar to the Edge Pro and use Edge Pro stones. It cut my sharpening time by 75%. I have stones that range from 150 grit to 1000, plus a leather strop. The knives come out looking beautiful and super sharp but the sharpening system is somewhat cost prohibitive for the average user. I look at sharpening systems like I look at reloading equipment. If you are going to use it a little, its not worth it. If you will use it a lot, it will pay off.
I plan to invest in the Edge Pro kit, just curious if you've sharpened many larger fixed blades on this system and your thought for knives large than folders or smaller fixed blades...

ROCK6
 

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Wile E Coyote, Genius.
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If you are sharpening a bunch of knives and are in a house with electricity, I would recommend the HF Belt sander method with the various grit belts. There are youtube videos. Results are amazing and super fast.

 

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The belt grinder is OK for a coarse edge. One must use care and not over heat the edge. Use can of water and submerge the blade often. Also keep the blade moving or it will gouge the blade. I have a grinder with a water wheel.The grinder allows me shape the knife and angle of the edge, the water wheel will bring the edge close enough to finish with a medium stone then the final sharpening. One must be very careful with mechanical sharpening of blades. I think the grinder and sander is best for the garden hoe.
 

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Wile E Coyote, Genius.
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The belt grinder is OK for a coarse edge. One must use care and not over heat the edge. Use can of water and submerge the blade often. Also keep the blade moving or it will gouge the blade. I have a grinder with a water wheel.The grinder allows me shape the knife and angle of the edge, the water wheel will bring the edge close enough to finish with a medium stone then the final sharpening. One must be very careful with mechanical sharpening of blades. I think the grinder and sander is best for the garden hoe.
The guy in the video owns a knife business.
As do others that use similar methods.

I have used the HF larger belt sander on some knives that needed more work to sharpen and very quickly had a very sharp edge just using one grit. I have also sharpened larger gardening tools as well.

Yes, you absolutely need to keep dipping the blade in water and move the blade with a purpose across the sanding device.
 

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I didn't do it
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I bought these... pretty happy with em...can get a razor sharp edge on just about anything...

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B07S19MD44/ref=ppx_yo_mob_b_inactive_ship_o0_img?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

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Water stones are best.
Japanese King 1000 is all you need,
It is a inexpensive, artificial stone. I think the best idea for a beginner.
6000 or 3000 is going to be an upgrade for sure. but no need in my opinion.
Once you learn the technique on the King 1000 you can use your glass cup to "hone the edge". Again just an upgrade no need to overdue it.
 
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