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What hell, pay attention
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I still prefer to use my Wusthof Knife Sharpening Steel.

As long as you keep a decent edge, that sharpening steel will make it much sharper with only a few licks. Sure you have to apply between major cuts, but to me, it is much better, and preferred, than using a sharpener with a v-wedge ceramic, metal or stone that strips metal off your knife....OUCH!!! I want to keep my knives as long as possible, especially good knives.
Its my understandng the steel doesnt really sharpen, just realigns the "rolled over edge" on the blades with a very fine angle.

They still have to be properly sharpened.
 

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High Concept
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4,845 Posts
Im not worried about getting cut, just getting the angle right. Theres no flat above the edge to guide the blade.
Much easier to hold an edge angle freehand if the blade is on a diagonal on the stone. It’s one of the first things I teach guys in our shops.

It increases the foot on the stone and is far easier to maintain the edge you want. You can put any amount of pressure you need to work the blade if it’s on the diagonal.




Working 90 degrees to the stone is far less stable, it can flip forward and back much easier.

 

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What hell, pay attention
Joined
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7,910 Posts
Much easier to hold an edge angle freehand if the blade is on a diagonal on the stone. It’s one of the first things I teach guys in our shops.

It increases the foot on the stone and is far easier to maintain the edge you want. You can put any amount of pressure you need to work the blade if it’s on the diagonal.




Working 90 degrees to the stone is far less stable, it can flip forward and back much easier.

I was refering to using the Work Sharp tool and keeping the knife in the right position with the guides.

I havent used flat stones like that in decades, and for the most part now, Ive been using the Lansky sharpeners.

Depending on the blades finish, I normally use three or four grades of emery on a flat surface for my double edged knives, but have had some success with the Lansky, depending on if I could find a place for the clamp.

This is the sort of blade Im refering too......







As you can see, theres no "flat" on the blade and the one point of reference, the crown on the blade, falls below the guide. Im thinking of just rigging an extention for the guide to get it closer to the belt and use the crown on the blade as the flat.
 

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High Concept
Joined
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4,845 Posts
I was refering to using the Work Sharp tool and keeping the knife in the right position with the guides.

I havent used flat stones like that in decades, and for the most part now, Ive been using the Lansky sharpeners.

Depending on the blades finish, I normally use three or four grades of emery on a flat surface for my double edged knives, but have had some success with the Lansky, depending on if I could find a place for the clamp.

This is the sort of blade Im refering too......







As you can see, theres no "flat" on the blade and the one point of reference, the crown on the blade, falls below the guide. Im thinking of just rigging an extention for the guide to get it closer to the belt and use the crown on the blade as the flat.
For complicated blade edges and swords we use tapered water stones. It’s done by feel and eye.

 

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I have a plastic "shoe box" of assorted sharpening stuff . I have diamond, several grits and sizes of stones ceramic and steel hones and leather for strops once I get a blade where I want I have a wood paddle with an Arkansas stone on one side and leather on the other. My preference for lubing stones is a 50/50 mix of Dawn dish soap and water. At the moment I am anchored in the house due to foot surgery and every knife I have out is a razor and I am going the start on the backup knife drawer
 
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