Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
toolmaker
Joined
·
138 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Over the years in different places and times I've seen people complain about something they got that's too hard to sharpen,or it won't stay sharp.
Only four reasons;
What they use to sharpen with
grind geometry
heat treat
usage
There is no excuse in that a steel is too hard just because it is a certain type steel. That's what diamond hones are for. They grind and sharpen carbide tooling.
All of the four aspects apply to anything that has to cut.
I'll be glad to hep with any questions.
Thanks
Erwin
 

·
reluctant sinner
Joined
·
16,910 Posts
Diamond stuff can work great. If you press too hard while using them it is possible to pull the diamonds out of the setting material and ruin the unit.

I like the eze laps stuff and have several different styles.
 

·
Destroyer of Karen
Joined
·
11,279 Posts
I have a worksharp and with some practice you can get a really nice edge.



Most of my hunting buddies give me their knives once a year for a touch up, which is fine because they pay in whitetail or axis :)
 

·
I didn't do it
Joined
·
568 Posts
If the edge is really rough I use a diamond sharpener...once the blade is relitivily sharp I keep it honed wit a ceramic rod...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
737 Posts
Biggest tricks I ever learned was stroke lenghtwise to minimize rolling, rub nail to check for wire edge, breaking/wearing wire edge on the opposite side by opening the angle, pushing more gently at a less lengthwise stroke, and finally using diamond hones that revolutionized everything by actually staying flat!

That is it really.

G.
 

·
High Concept
Joined
·
4,842 Posts
Diamond stuff can work great. If you press too hard while using them it is possible to pull the diamonds out of the setting material and ruin the unit.

I like the eze laps stuff and have several different styles.
Diamond stones we use for certain wood working tools because they can be too aggressive on fine blades.

We’ve always hand sharpened knives and we train our guys very well before letting them near customers knives.

Naniwa stones are my best choice that we use most often. King stones are generally for normal household knives.

Very expensive Japanese blades we use only Naniwa stones. None of their chefs would let us near them with diamond stones.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Diamond stones and hones come in different grits.
Many companies say theirs are course or fine or smooth but like many things everyone's idea of smooth or course are different.
I like Diamond stones (I have several) and that is my usual go-to sharpener unless the knife just needs a little touch-up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,785 Posts
I just sharpened a bunch of knives. If the edge is nicked, I use a cheap coarse/fine stone to break it down fast. I use a little Smith's oil applied to the blade, the stone sucks it up quickly. Then onto an Arkansas hard stone with oil. I need to get one of those rods to take it to the next level.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,950 Posts
Different tools for different jobs, but diamonds and ceramics are likely close to universal! They will not give the finest edge possible, but will sharpen pretty much everything adequately!

When I worked daily with a knife I carried a folding fine grade diamond stone in my back pocket.

Now I keep a ceramic stone on my desk at work and pretty much all other common options at the house!

If I had nothing and only wanted one portable option that would sharpen most things I was likely to run across I’d purchase: https://www.amazon.com/DMT-FWFC-Double-Diafold-Sharpener/dp/B00004WFTW?ref_=ast_sto_dp

If I bought a second thing it would likely be: https://www.amazon.com/Purpose-Fing...83297&sprefix=Fingernail+bu,tools,268&sr=8-43 to finish polishing the edge once the DMT was finished with it!

SD
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,040 Posts
never thought much about it, never spend more than 5 minutes sharpeneing anything. takes 20 seconds to touch up a dulling edge, and a stone is fine, I prefer the round sharpeners to put an edge on that come in like a kitchen set - takes 20 seconds. If the edge is bad, just touch up with a file, then stone, then the tool to put a quick edge on.

Cutting a tomatoe sharp is fine for me, and I don't want any of the crazy - ultra sharp things you can get. I want to cut things, but if I happen to hit a finger - I want stitches, not a through and through.

Only time I've ever seen anyone stuggle to sharpen a blade is when they just don't get that you have to get it at just the right angle, and they are just too high or too low.
 

·
What hell, pay attention
Joined
·
7,910 Posts
I just picked up a Ken Onion Work Sharp about a week ago and so far, Im pretty impressed.

It seems to quickly get a good working edge on things, although Im still figuring things out and getting used to it. So far, not everything will shave the hair on my arm, but Im getting there with some.

Still trying to figure out how to do my double edge knives too.

Prior to that, Ive been using Lanskys, and always had good results. They take a bit of work and time to get the inital edge, but once you do, they touch up pretty quick and easy, and "shaving sharp" is the norm.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,290 Posts
I just picked up a Ken Onion Work Sharp about a week ago and so far, Im pretty impressed.

It seems to quickly get a good working edge on things, although Im still figuring things out and getting used to it. So far, not everything will shave the hair on my arm, but Im getting there with some.

Still trying to figure out how to do my double edge knives too.

Prior to that, Ive been using Lanskys, and always had good results. They take a bit of work and time to get the inital edge, but once you do, they touch up pretty quick and easy, and "shaving sharp" is the norm.
Double edge ? I’d just use something to put over the top edge to keep from getting cut.

They also make a grinder attachment. I’m about to get one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,534 Posts
I still prefer to use my Wusthof Knife Sharpening Steel.

As long as you keep a decent edge, that sharpening steel will make it much sharper with only a few licks. Sure you have to apply between major cuts, but to me, it is much better, and preferred, than using a sharpener with a v-wedge ceramic, metal or stone that strips metal off your knife....OUCH!!! I want to keep my knives as long as possible, especially good knives.
 

·
What hell, pay attention
Joined
·
7,910 Posts
Double edge ? I’d just use something to put over the top edge to keep from getting cut.

They also make a grinder attachment. I’m about to get one.
Im not worried about getting cut, just getting the angle right. Theres no flat above the edge to guide the blade.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top