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American fearmaker
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14,248 Posts
1. Keep your tactics simple.

2. Go for accuracy. Speed will follow automatically.

3. When you use a rifle, have a low powered sight/scope mounted on it for urban or close quarters combat. Something with a 1 to 4 power magnification will increase your overall accuracy without turning your rifle into a sniper rifle.
 

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Banned
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2,077 Posts
1-Try and always be the first on the trigger pull.
2-Try and always have more ammo then them.
3-Try and always be more physically fit then them, just in case 1 and 2 don't come together for you.......you'll at least be able to out run them.
 

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Son Of Liberty
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1,871 Posts
Practice

:thumb:
 

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+Adcock
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3,102 Posts
The basics,

1) Hold rifles with your arms bent and either in a tri-pod fashion (at the elbows) or with your trigger arm rested against your side.
2) When you go to fire press the rifle overly hard against your shoulder, take a full breath in.
3) Then, let the rifle loosen up a half tick and let out half of your breath.

If you follow this for the basics then you will find that you have a 3-5 second window where the front site will sit dead nuts still. With a scope, same deal.

By pulling the rifle in hard/relaxing and controlling your breathing you will see a marked improvement in your groups.

Now this is just basic shooting 101. However, the basics are what you need in order to do anything advanced.
 

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Stack It Deep.
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649 Posts
This is my rifle. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My rifle is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it as I master my life. My rifle, without me, is useless. Without my rifle, I am useless. I must fire my rifle true. I must shoot straighter than my enemy who is trying to kill me. I must shoot him before he shoots me. I will....

My rifle and myself know that what counts in this war is not the rounds we fire, the noise of our burst, nor the smoke we make. We know that it is the hits that count. We will hit...

My rifle is human, even as I, because it is my life. Thus, I will learn it as a brother. I will learn its weakness, its strength, its parts, its accessories, its sights and its barrel. I will keep my rifle clean and ready, even as I am clean and ready. We will become part of each other. We will...

Before God I swear this creed. My rifle and myself are the defenders of my country. We are the masters of our enemy. We are the saviors of my life. So be it, until victory is America's and there is no enemy, but Peace.

PEACE THROUGH STRENGTH.
 

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right-wing ******* psycho
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12 Posts
What i've found is just aiming my rifle at random targets by keeping it at rest and snapping it to shoulder has helped my accuracy alot. Every now and then i'll carry around my rifle, spot something random and see how fast I can aquire the target. I dont even need to use any ammunition for this, so I can do it inside my house.
 

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Geronimo!
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4,053 Posts
Dry firing your side arm (with snap caps, et al) is goooooood for you. :) Practice, practice, practice .... dry firing is underestimated by most. I do it almost every day and I teach all my students how to do it ... and to do it often.
 

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Geronimo!
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4,053 Posts
Center Axis Relock, check it out.
That's all fine and good and a great technique that was taught to me years ago and I've practiced since ... but it is not for beginners. It's meant strictly to be employed from the ready position, not from the draw - and you have to be very very careful with your weak hand when bringing your weapon up to the ready - especially with handguns, much less so with longer sticks but it definitely does lend one to short stroke a pump unless you get very used to the movement from ready to high to shoulder.

It is much more practical, and safer, to practice with the sidearm from the draw, slapping a weak hand to your chest to get it out of the way for the first two high/low shots followed by the third however you feel best delivering.

Just a thought. Would hate to see a newbie run to the backyard to try that and end up shooting off a finger or taking a slide to the ribs or wrist.
 

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NRA Instructor-Ohio CCW
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3,169 Posts
I was taught to draw to the ready position. Any technique requires practice.
That's all fine and good and a great technique that was taught to me years ago and I've practiced since ... but it is not for beginners. It's meant strictly to be employed from the ready position, not from the draw - and you have to be very very careful with your weak hand when bringing your weapon up to the ready - especially with handguns, much less so with longer sticks but it definitely does lend one to short stroke a pump unless you get very used to the movement from ready to high to shoulder.

It is much more practical, and safer, to practice with the sidearm from the draw, slapping a weak hand to your chest to get it out of the way for the first two high/low shots followed by the third however you feel best delivering.

Just a thought. Would hate to see a newbie run to the backyard to try that and end up shooting off a finger or taking a slide to the ribs or wrist.
 

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Registered
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751 Posts
For pistol shooting, I was taught the following.

Work on your draw: When you're at home have someone say 'left' 'right' 'ahead' 'behind' at random intervals. Practice drawing from whatever position you're in, and ready your weapon against a threat in that direction. A snap cap in your pistol can allow you to see how long it would take for first shot. This works great with a buddy, just walk in the woods and trade directions with the other.

Find the front sight: At ranges where you're going to be dealing with a dangerous person from a situation of surprise, you don't need as many sights as they put on a gun. Within five feet, don't even bother with this. Just draw and pull. Out to about 15 yards, if you can find the front sight and put it on target you'll hit within minute of bad guy...without having to take the time to align the rear sights. A big dot sight helps with this, though it is eminently possible to do this with regular sights as well. Past 15 yards, your first instinct should be to find cover, so you can take time to properly align the sights. Practice the front sight only shooting at the range. You learn a lot by 'feel' with this technique, and it does take practice.

It's not the first shot that wins, it's the first shot that hits that wins: I don't think I need to explain this. Put the big dot on center of mass and squeeze off a round and you should hit the guy. It likely won't be a heart hit, but you are quite likely to hit a lung. If he's still a threat, your gun should be in a ready position now, and your assailant has lost the surprise he was counting on. Align the sights and continue shooting until there is no more threat.

These are the three basic rules my grandfather taught me, when it came time for me to learn about pistol work. He learned them from his father, who was a lifetime military man, and honed them in his ten years as an officer. They work for me. The biggest thing, though, for everyone, is practice, practice, practice!
 

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Banned
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9,794 Posts
This isn't a shooting tip, but its related.

The most useless thing in the world is an unloaded gun, so practice loading endlessly. Regardless of what particular gun you chose, practice quick loading. From every conceivable position, in the dark, with gloves on etc.

Mag fed weapons can be practiced with right at home. Of course, make certain the weapon is unloaded, along with the magazines you intend to use for practice. Leave a few laying around, and move to each one carrying the rifle. Practice getting the mag out, and the next back in as quickly as possible. Looks silly, but its good practice you can do without going to the range.

At my personal range I will often load my 30 rounders with 5 rounds apiece and move from various positions, firing 5 rounds from each position, and changing mags on the move to the next location. I use 5 rounds because I get more mag swaps on each run.

My pump shotty I go 1 shell at a time. You get real good at re-loading this way. Do it enough and you won't even have to think about it, your hands will work on auto pilot. Thats the goal. Do it until it becomes automatic.

Again, you should do this from various positions, and on the move as well.

Which leads me to my second point, which is actual shooting.

Bench rest and stationary target practice isn't enough. If you expect that some day, like shtf or something along those lines, that you might be in a firefight, you won't have a perfect rest, and will probably be moving. Its a good idea to at least get comfortable with shooting on the move. In all weather and conditions.

Take up hunting. Shooting paper targets is fine, but theres a world of difference between punching paper and using your skill to make a kill. This will also give you the opportunity to train your mind to pick your shot, as opposed to having the shot set up for for you with a target. Animals don't have convenient bullseyes pasted on them!

Hunting is aslo a great way to get used to carrying a weapon. The more time you spend with your weapon of choice, the more familiar with it you will become.

Shoot as often as you can. The more time you have behind the trigger the better. If ammo cost is an issue, get a .22. Its not the same as using your gun of choice (unless its a .22, lol) but its better than nothing. As with any talent/skill, if you don't use it, you lose it.
 
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