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Hey guys, I am new to fish filleting, and learned how to do it for the first time this past November. I've filleted a bit since then, however usually when going out with the guys. I would borrow one of their fillet knives and go to work. I will be going by myself in a few days, and don't have a fillet knife, nor the funds to purchase one (X-mas shopping totally wiped me out). However, I was throwing away a bunch of old kitchen ware, and came across a set of steak knives. Nothing expensive. However, I was looking it and it was about the same length and shape at the fillet knives I used. There were some longer ones, but I used a few the same size as this steak knife. Plus this knife still has sharp serrations, so it is pretty darn sharp So my question, since I have never used one for this, can one use a serrated knife for fish filleting? Will it cause a mess of the meat?
 

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I help enlighten folks
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filet knives aren't serrated. just buy one for 7 bucks.
 

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Really?
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Do a search on You Tube on fish filleting and see what they use.....alot of folks are going to electric slicing knives( and they are serrated), but I don't. I use a regular fillet knife, as that what I've used all my life.
 

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RESET CONGRESS!!
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In a pinch, use what'cha got. Get a filet knife down the road. I prefer a nice filet knife, but I've used a $2.00 pocket knife when I was a kid.

I watched a guy on Youtube fillet a fish with a Kukri! No small knife! Now I can't find it, but thus guy gets it done with a rather large blade.. serrated or not, just enjoy the fishing and the meal! (Wal Mart used to carry some inexpensive Rapala filet knives in a couple of different lengths.)



http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41268S9869L._AA260_.jpg
 

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You can use any knife to filet a fish, but I'd recommend purchasing an inexpensive Rapala filet knife. They are extremely flexible, sharp, easy to sharpen and last forever. I have two. A big one for salmon and such and a medium one for everything else. the medium will do em all, but for salmon the big one is just easier.
 

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Heck with some fish you can eat the right out of the river like they are... salmon you can do that.. no cooking just catch and go chomp... but for cleaning fish a fleaxble knife with a plain edge works best.. you can use a pocket knife no problem and Ive done it in the past as a kid as well.. but cutting up a 15lb salmon is a pain in the but with a small knife...
 

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Rebel with a cause
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You could filet fish with a machette if you had to. A thin sharp blade will make the job quicker. If you have a lot of fish ( over 50lbs) try to borrow an electric knife. Its the same one you carved the Christmas turkey with.
 

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I have to agree on the long straight bladed knives for filleting, but I have never liked an overly flexible blade.
I have a Frost Mora carbon steel filleting knife now that is a dream to use, it's so easy.

I'd steer clear of the serrated knife, all the back and forth to cut means your gonna be loosing meat and making a rough job of the fillet.
Just go buy a cheap Rapala knife, I've used those and it'll do better than a serrated knife till you can buy a decent blade.
 

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Your knife will work, but I suggest a knife without serrations because you will get a cleaner cut (more meat). I purchased a 6" Rapala for about $15 and it does the job just fine. Good luck!
 

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Agreed - I've done it with a swiss army knife once - but it wasn't pretty. The Rapala Superflex knives run about 20 bucks and I would recommend those. Probably the best cheap fillet knife I've used (And continue to use).
 

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I recommend a kukri! :D:




My fillet and bait knife. The fillet knife is a CRKT Big Eddy and has a small very sharp serrated section close to the handle. If I don't have a sturdier knife then the serrated section will get through fish heads and cartilage. The bait knife is much thicker and doesn't flex at all, which is perfect for the tough jobs. On the back it has some fairly blunt serrations which are excellent for de-scaling.

As others have said a plain edge fillet knife is the way to go.
 

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If you got a kitchen knife set then you have one of the best filleting knives around--the round nosed ham slicer...long, flexible but stiff enough to handle big rib cages...We keep a half dozen all the time in the fish shack--faster changing knives then taking a steel to them...We use the pointy, flexible ones to take out the cheeks and fine detail the Y bones in the tail of Northern Pike...
 
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