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Got to keep on keepin on
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
"Warning" I have never served in the military so if this is something y'all learned in "x" week of Basic/Infantry school, please :rolleyes: now.

I think we'd agree that w/o a magazine, the detachable magazine weapon loses much of it's usefulness. And I DO understand that, in a firefight, one's primary concern has to be to kill/neutralize the threat and stay alive, everything else comes after.

But - what do you do with the empty mag, in a combat situation, when it's time to reload?
Just hit the release, let the thing drop to the ground and get the next one in there ASAP? I'll worry about the empty IF i survive?
Do you put it in some kind of a bag or pocket? (pants cargo?) Keep it from getting stepped on & getting the feed lips bent, filled with dirt/mud/sand etc.
:confused:

In target/speed shooting, I've got plenty of time to pick up/replace my empties before the next round and no one shooting back. :eek: In a SHTF, likely not so much. If there's already another thread on this, a link or FM that covers, have mercy on this civilian and post it up. All help appreciated. Thanks. :thumb:
 

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With mags springs and followers.....
When using mags we clean after range time. On ar mags we remove bases
then remove springs and followers, place a rag on a shotgun brush and wipe
the inside to remove dirt and dust we spray a graphite lubricant inside the mags and on the lips.
With another rag place a couple of drops CLP and wipe down the spring completely top to bottom, wipe down the follower as well removing any dirt.
At this point should be ready to reassemble and ready to use.......
 

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Layman
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I heard a marine say once that they shove them down there shirt, when there shirt is tucked in.

when i bought my m1 carbine the mag was wore out.. what was happening was on the 3rd to first rounds the bolt would skip over the round.

anyways to fix it I took the mag spring out and Pulled it to increase the length of the spring..

so far it has worked like a champ..

This may be useful if you have any bad mags
 

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Why do you ask? 2 Dogs!
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I would think in a true life or death situation

Dropping that mag would be the least of your problems

It's all situation dependent though

You do.....what you gotta do

Make sure you have plenty of mags
 

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Got to keep on keepin on
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Nomad, thanks for the tip on cleaning them after the hostiles are dealt with but I'm thinking more about the period of time from when the mag is empty/no longer immediately useful to when you're at a place for cleaning.

Sloth, thanks.

I was told a long time ago that some soldiers on long patrols in Vietnam would have some type of empty bag on a strap to drop the mag in as it was used since any extra ammo taken along/re-supplied was boxed or on stripper clips to save space & weight. But you had to keep your empty mags with you as it wasn't practical to go crawling around the jungle trying to find them. Is that accurate?
I just picture something like that getting caught on brush etc and being a general pain.

Or in our modern disposable society, are they just left on the battlefield to rust/rot, become relics & maybe picked up later by locals/insurgents who don't have access to the logistics our troops do?
 

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Add a dump pouch to your belt which you can toss the empty mag into. Even in the field, ammo is supplied easy enough, but you want to hang onto your mags, especially if you have good ones. In a SHTF/TEOTWAWKI situation, as you have stated, the mags will be almost as valuable as the ammo they hold.
 

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Farm Security for Hire
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"Warning" I have never served in the military so if this is something y'all learned in "x" week of Basic/Infantry school, please :rolleyes: now.

I think we'd agree that w/o a magazine, the detachable magazine weapon loses much of it's usefulness. And I DO understand that, in a firefight, one's primary concern has to be to kill/neutralize the threat and stay alive, everything else comes after.

But - what do you do with the empty mag, in a combat situation, when it's time to reload?
Just hit the release, let the thing drop to the ground and get the next one in there ASAP? I'll worry about the empty IF i survive?
Do you put it in some kind of a bag or pocket? (pants cargo?) Keep it from getting stepped on & getting the feed lips bent, filled with dirt/mud/sand etc.
:confused:

In target/speed shooting, I've got plenty of time to pick up/replace my empties before the next round and no one shooting back. :eek: In a SHTF, likely not so much. If there's already another thread on this, a link or FM that covers, have mercy on this civilian and post it up. All help appreciated. Thanks. :thumb:
I just went around the wagon wheel about retaining magazines on another thread. Don't dare suggest that you try to retain magazines during SHTF on this forum.

If you train to hold onto your mags, you'll be killed by jackals, and someone will hit your cat with a brick, and those who drop mags on the ground shall inherit the earth.
 

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Fish Slayer
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If it's a S.H.T.F. type situation, you need to retain your magazines if at all possible. Get a dump pouch, or drop the empty ones down your tucked in shirt. If your talking pistol magazines, just stuff them in your pants pockets.
 

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In another, similar thread there were those who received actual military and LEO training in forms of tactical weapons use who understood that when engaged and reloading, the last consideration was where the empty magazine went and such things can be over, good or bad, in seconds and that's what the focus is, every second counts. (Some don't understand there are different types of loading for different circumstances.)

Consider the reloading process when firing DURING and engagement. As you're emptying your magazine, you are reaching for another one with your support hand. It's the loaded magazine is your hand when you hit the magazine release, the magazine falls and you insert another magazine and that support hand returns to what it's supposed to do, provide support for the weapon. What third hand is grabbing that empty magazine?


There were others of dubious reported training who believe that even when rounds are coming in on you and there's an incredible need to return fire, and you've emptied our magazine, you should 1. Carefully remove the magazine so that you don't marr the finish. 2. Open your dump pouch. 3. Carefully place the magazine in a dump pouch making sure that you don't bang the feed lips or the bottom against other magazines, 4. reseal the Velco or snap closure of your dump pouch and only then 5. Draw out another magazine and carefully insert it into the magazine well. You enemy will be understanding and he will not fire on you during this thirty second process and he expects the same courtesy.



In training, a short while ago we dumped our $33 S&W M&P magazines many, many times. They got dirty, the plastic bases get scratched. We do this everytime. We're training for those critical seconds. That should be your focus.

There's common sense to this: In a small scale engagement like most potential survivalist scenarios the shooting is likely going to be over in seconds, one way or the other. Hopefully you're fighting to win and will prevail.

If it's not hot and there's a lull, then static load a fresh magazine and reload the one in there and put it back in the magazine pouch.

I've replaced bandoleers with actual bags with shoulder straps. Each holds 8 30 round M16 magazines loaded with 27 rounds of 5.56 mm NATO. I consider those magazines disposable. I get into anything and go through all that, the likelihood of either side being concerned about silly things like magazines is pretty dang low. How many firefights are those preppers who retain their magazines planning on being in?
 

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Good post, Prepping.

In short, there is no single right answer. The answer my friend ... is not blowing on the wind ... the answer depends on the situation. Unfortunately, when I went through Basic Training nearly three decades ago, they didn't teach us much about reloads, magazine retention and the like.

Here are a few basic rules that I adhere to now that I'm older and wiser than I was in Basic:

1. If you have to choose between your magazine and your life ... choose your life and drop your magazine in the dirt.

2. If you can retain your magazine, without risking your life by doing so, go ahead and retain it. Maintain situational awareness while doing so.

3. You can only have too many magazines and/or too much ammo at two times ... when you are on fire and when you are drowning. Many people stock up on ammunition but only have one or two magazines for their weapon(s). This is a mistake.

4. If you utilize weapons that are relatively common to your A.O., you may be able to retrieve others' magazines after the lead stops flying (assuming you survived).

5. Most magazines don't need a lot of maintenance to work properly but dumping out the sand, dirt, mud, blood and crud every now and then can't hurt.

6. You will NOT destroy your magazines by storing them loaded. An unloaded magazine won't do you any good if the S suddenly hits the F ... even if the spring is in perfect working condition.

As always, YMMV.
 

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My mags get dropped , get dirty, and unless they get real dirty or muddy i dont do anything except reload. My mags are also allways loaded.:eek:
 
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