Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,085 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i just finished having my crawlspace sealed and finished with this stuff:

http://www.basementsystems.com/crawl-space/crawl-space-products/cleanspace.html

this gives me an extra 1900 feet of usable space that is clean, dry and climate controlled, so i can store stuff down there.

other benefits are my floors stay warmer, saving heating costs and energy, i don't have to worry about radon (a problem in this area) and i don't have to worry about bugs or mold or other unhealthy things going on under my house.

it's one of those improvements to the home you don't blatantly see but is totally worth it. i'm kind of excited.

i know most people in the us don't have to deal with a crawlspace, but if you have one, it might be worth looking into.
 

·
sic transit gloria mundi
Joined
·
858 Posts
Well, I'm sure you checked this out but there are some places in the country where you need air movement through the crawl space.

I have to admit to being confused by their use of the term "air tight crawl space vents". If it's air tight, by definition it ain't a vent.
 

·
SquiddusMaximus (Retired)
Joined
·
3,059 Posts
Get some .6 mil poly like they use on asbestos jobs, some duct tape, spray glue and you'll be in business and at a fraction of the cost.

Radon is a gas that is the result of decay process of Radium 222. Here is the link for the EPA:

http://www.epa.gov/radon/pubs/citguide.html

I have a background in hazmat (Asbestos/Radon/Lead Paint/UST remediation) and you might have to vent out that space as radon can get into your home via some weird transport methods.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,630 Posts
you need ventilation period. covering the dirt with a poly product and making it clean and dry for storage is a really good idea. as a contractor i really appreciate a clean space to work in especially a crawl.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,787 Posts
Install some sort of vent. Something like a dryer vent.

Heres why:

A vapor barrier is like a bullet proof vest for water vapor as the name implys. What can happen is one area of the product may not be COMPLETELY sealed. Maybe a crack or an area that is just hard to provide sufficient coverage. Moisture WILL get in and won't have a way out. It can build up over time creating mold when you didn't have any before.

You may notice old homes don't get mold as often as newer homes. That is because old homes breath and moisture can escape. When the vapor does get in to your crawl space is will hit the underside of the floor (the coolest surface in the summer) and create bulk water. Where ever the vapor came in at may not allow for liquid to escape.

Its the same concept as a roof vent. A sealed attic space would be a breeding ground for mold if there were no roof vents or soffit vents.

At least keep a close eye on the space as it begins to warm up. You're crawl space may breath sufficiently avoiding a problem. If you notice it gets rather humid down there consider putting in some sort of vent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,205 Posts
i just finished having my crawlspace sealed and finished with this stuff:

http://www.basementsystems.com/crawl-space/crawl-space-products/cleanspace.html

this gives me an extra 1900 feet of usable space that is clean, dry and climate controlled, so i can store stuff down there.

other benefits are my floors stay warmer, saving heating costs and energy, i don't have to worry about radon (a problem in this area) and i don't have to worry about bugs or mold or other unhealthy things going on under my house.

it's one of those improvements to the home you don't blatantly see but is totally worth it. i'm kind of excited.

i know most people in the us don't have to deal with a crawlspace, but if you have one, it might be worth looking into.
I have looked at this in the past ... if you don't mind my asking ... what did it put you back?
 

·
Carpenter
Joined
·
247 Posts
I'm a builder in michigan. We see/do that kind of stuff all the time up here. As far as ventilation goes, exposed dirt is NOT ventilation. Up here we have vents that go in the block or concrete walls. I can't remember the building code off the top of my head but its a surprising high number.
 

·
outdoorsman
Joined
·
467 Posts
I'm a builder in michigan. We see/do that kind of stuff all the time up here. As far as ventilation goes, exposed dirt is NOT ventilation. Up here we have vents that go in the block or concrete walls. I can't remember the building code off the top of my head but its a surprising high number.
we have them in KY too. In the first picture it was there and they covered it. Pipe sweating will definately occur.

edit but we do also have the plastic down on the ground to keep the moisture out.
 

·
Preparing since 1972
Joined
·
5,612 Posts
On several products i used a product from Menards called REFLECTIC...It has aluminum foil on each side and 2 layers of air bubbles i between...It reflects heat/cold and has a high insulating value.....
 

·
Chains keep us together.
Joined
·
22,136 Posts
A vent is a good idea, there's also mold to consider along with radon, moisture,ect. If you sealed all walls and floor, moisture can still come from the other side and cause a problem. a fan and a few vents will help. there are also heat recovery ventilators that could help, if you have a moisture problem from the inside.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top