Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,

Found these files at an estate sale for 6 bucks. Grabbed them because I keep telling myself someday I'm going to learn to forge myself a knife or two.

Did a half assed cleaning job and oiled them to prevent rust. I'll do a more thorough cleaning later.

These are about 18" long. The Prince file has aggressive sharp teeth about halfway across one side and dull the rest of the way.

Any info about the purpose of these file? Worth keeping as a file instead of knife stock?

Thanks in advance
Table Product Rectangle Wood Tool
Hood Road surface Wood Line Parallel
Hood Road surface Wood Line Parallel
Grey Wood Font Tints and shades Artifact
Textile Rectangle Grey Carbon Material property
Wood Grey Artifact Font Trunk
Grey Artifact Wood Trunk Art
Table Product Rectangle Wood Tool

Hood Road surface Wood Line Parallel

Wood Grey Artifact Font Trunk

Grey Wood Font Tints and shades Artifact

Textile Rectangle Grey Carbon Material property

Grey Artifact Wood Trunk Art
 

·
Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum
Joined
·
13,737 Posts
The Nicholson looks like a wood file and the two with the finer teeth look like metal working files.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,324 Posts
Last one is a rasp , second from last on the right is a double cut . The one that says nucut (brand) is a single cut and can also be called a mill smooth. The one that is rounded is a half round file.
Rasps are for wood , double cut are for heavy metal removal and singlecut (mill smooth) are for lite smooth finish cuts.
All need handles as they can be dangerous to use with out.
My go to in toolmaking was mostly a mill smooth, then there are needle files , diamond needle files rifflers ect.
I use various rasps at times in woodworking.
 

·
Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum
Joined
·
13,737 Posts
Anyone know how to "sharpen" a file? Any guesses?
In my cnc machining class we used a file card to clean them. We also loaded them with chalk to keep them from getting gummed up. But we never sharpened any.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,324 Posts
One company I worked at would send files out to be resharpened but I don't know the process on how it is done.
It never seemed to be as good as it was new. Only make contact on the forward stroke if you want them to last.
And yes a file card is a must , they're cheap and you'll thank yourself every time you need it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,324 Posts
Nice to see someone still using old iron (shaper) even if not for it's intended purpose.

IMO all the video proved is that when you smack the steel against the file ( like in the video with the air cylinder) it causes a bit of damage , minute but it adds up. In actual use you wouldn't be engaging the work that abrupt. You come into the work and apply pressure with your stroke.
The teeth are likely around R-62 on hardness which is quite hard but at the same time brittle if mishandled.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,006 Posts
If you try to make a knife from any coarse file (like that rasp), you should grind the teeth off first or you will likely get pockets in the knife metal.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top