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www.koselscords.webs.com
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Discussion Starter #1
im looking for a backpack that i can bring to school and double as a camping bag also. i dont wasnt it to be huge, just a standard size backpack.
thanks, Mitchell
 

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That's going to be a very big school bag. Even the most hardcore ultralight minimalist hikers still use packs that would be huge for a school bag.

The big question is: How much space do you require for camping?
 

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I used to have a realy small bivy/bag/tarp kit that fit nicely in the bottom 3rd of a standard sized school backpack... but it was not a 4 season bullet proof kit, and clothing and food was not a part of the kit. It really depends on your gear
 

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I am Jody
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No, not really the Army 3 day assault packs are not very big at all. My 13 yo son uses a USMC issue bag for school.

http://cgi.ebay.com/USMC-Digital-Marpat-Assault-Pack-/300541409192?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item45f9a9f7a8
That's still pretty big for a school bag, yet from the specs, appears incredibly small for a camping bag for most people. I'm finding a capacity of anywhere between 1500-2500 cubic inches for the pack. Not many people can camp with that little capacity, especially on this site where people pack so much heavy duty gear. As I said, an ultralighter might be able to make this pack work with everything inside, but most people are going to have to find a way to store their sleeping bag and pad outside of the pack.

It doesn't matter how much pack space you, me or some mythical ultralight minimalist hiker uses. All that matters is what the OP needs.
 

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Just about any backpack will work for that. But if you want me to recommend something, then look at the maxpedition line.





If you do not want a full blown backpack, the maxpedition sitka is a nice solution.

 

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You want to be ready for camping when you get out?

When I was going to that instition like 4 years ago, I remember really needing to carry some paper and pens/pencils. If it can carry a binder and at least one book, then it would suffice for that task.

Now a main backpack for camping would be about 16x16x6 in measurement of the largest compartment at least if you don't have a butt pack and/or other LBE equipment.

I personally think it is a waste of time to look for a camping backpack that is tiny.
 

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If you'd like to save a little cash, you could pick up this particular 3-day:

http://www.uscav.com/productinfo.aspx?productid=16985&tabid=1

I own one and its decent for a lower-end pack. Its not huge, but should do you well for what you are planning on using it for.

Some complaints with this pack are its crappy sewing/design around the shoulder straps; if you throw this thing around with 60+ pounds of gear in it, over time its going to rip.

Its convenient if you don't want to dump $200+ on a higher quality one, though.

This video gives a pretty good rundown of it:

 

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If you'd like to save a little cash, you could pick up this particular 3-day:

http://www.uscav.com/productinfo.aspx?productid=16985&tabid=1
This looks like the first recommendation for a pack that's actually big enough to go camping with. It's a pack that's over 4000 cubic inches, which I think is the minimum that should be recommended unless the person is a professed hardcore ultralight minimalist backpacker.

Everything else would require strapping the sleeping bag, pad and maybe even the tent on the outside of the pack. That's a horrible way to use any pack that's not a hauler with an external frame. On any internally framed pack, the sleeping bag should go inside. The problem with the other recommendations is that they were for packs that have a total capacity barely over 2000 cubic inches. A sleeping bag is commonly over 1000 cubic inches. That leaves little space for food, water, cookware and clothing, not to mention other smaller items.

I do think this pack is a poor choice for school, but at least it can actually do both jobs.

Other recommendations can come from looking at REI and seeing what ultralight packs they have. Those are fairly compact, and can often get a lot smaller by using its cinch straps. Bring all your camping gear to REI and try those packs out. That really is the best way to buy any pack. There are other companies that make more compact packs, but they are mostly mail order, and they be too small for a traditional backpacker. If you have a high quality down sleeping bag like a Western Mountaineering, Feathered Friends or Montbell and a very compact shelter, then we can talk about those other companies.
 
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