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In a long term survival SHTF situation, could you scavenge meat from a dead animal? If you did somehow get over the nasty factor, how would you cook the meat?


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Inspect the liver's color; it could indicate a diseased animal. The liver's surface should be smooth and wet and its color deep red or purple. If the liver appears diseased, discard it. However, a diseased liver does not indicate you cannot eat the muscle tissue.

Cook large meat pieces over a spit or boil them. You can stew or boil smaller pieces, particularly those that remain attached to bone after the initial butchering, as soup or broth. You can cook body organs such as the heart, liver, pancreas, spleen, and kidneys using the same methods as for muscle meat. You can also cook and eat the brain. Cut the tongue out, skin it, boil it until tender, and eat it.

Drying Meat


To preserve meat by drying, cut it into 6-millimeter strips with the grain. Hang the meat strips on a rack in a sunny location with good air flow. Keep the strips out of the reach of animals and cover them to keep blowflies off. Allow the meat to dry thoroughly before eating. Properly dried meat will have a dry, crisp texture and will not feel cool to the touch.

Other Preservation Methods

You can also preserve meats using the freezing or brine and salt methods.

If you do not have a collection of ebooks, I suggest yout visit http://www.survivalebooks.com/
 

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Anarchist/Animist Primate
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Depending on the meat's condition, I would think cooking the heck out of it would take care of most biological hazards.

I was looking into small, individual pressure cooker. I like the idea of the pressure cooker because you can cook with less fuel, less water, and pretty much guarantee that you wipe out any viruses, parasites, bacteria, and so on.
 

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Psalm 23:4
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Good post. I know folks that eat road kill by choice. Not my thing but I could if I had to. I was taught to stay away from the brain organs and bone marrow unless I knew for a fact the animal was healthy though.
 

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I would only eat roadkill that I did myself and could process asap....in fact I consider it against my grain to waste an animal I accidentally killed. Done it before.
 

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This must be a trick question, because millions of people do eat roadkill everyday in the United States and around the world, and you never hear them having any problems from eating the roadkill unless they don't clean it right.
 

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Long term shtf meat scavenger hunt

I've eaten road kill.
Many country folks have.
Some folks hunt with their vehicles just hoping for an unlucky critter to cross their path.

The question of "long term survival SHTF situation" scavenging found venison presents a different set of criteria.

To my mind, a long term survival **** hit the fan situation means there are no more big rigs running the roads thinning the local deer population.

However, the question remains.
Just how bad does a dead deer have to smell to no longer be viable as a food source?

I guess it depends on how hungry you are.
 

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Pleasantly demented woman
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I'm reminded of Cold Mountain, where starving Confederate soldiers (gone AWOL) ate a deer they found frozen to the ground. They all got sick. It's fiction, but it certainly comes to my mind. Ugh.
 

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Bread Baker
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Hmm.. I suppose if we were hungry enough. I vote stay away from organ meat, just go for muscular meat. It *should* be safe if maggots haven't set in.. I think. I would do my best to gut it, clean it, and only take meat that appeared to be healthy. Not swollen, oozing, etc.
 

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If shtf and you find a dead animal it's not likely to be a fresh roadkill. It's more likely to be something that was diseased OR someone else injured it but didn't get a good enough hit to drop it or track it.

If things were that bad people wouldn't likely LEAVE an obvious food source laying there without good reason. And if they injured it on purpose they're likely in the area and still looking for their dinner.

So I'd say it would depend on how it came to be dead whether I would approach it or not. So assuming I found it safe to approach and appeared to be reasonably fresh..... yeah, I'd open it up and see what was up. I would not eat visibly spoiled food though. I'd rather go hungry and pray for a fresher meal than spend my last days retching up something nasty along with whatever water I might have gotten down.
 

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"One Second After" is a really good book to read. It will make you think about what you will eat. People were scraping the fat and grease off the old cookers in the cafe to eat it. Hard to say what you would really eat after starving for a month or so.
 

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If there's a serious breakdown of social order that lasts for a year you can bet the wildlife in this country will pretty much be wiped out.
 

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reading accounts from the indian wars here in the west , like the men stranded on Beechers Island in Kansas surounded by Souix and Cheyenne they spoke of taking the meat closest to the bone of the army horses and mules . of course thier stomachs could handle way more than ours can . With the onset of modern presertives and steril conditions that we live with in this day and age im not sure , I tend to think I would try to eat the freshest kills and preserve what i could , eat the best cuts and move on .
 

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Depending on the meat's condition, I would think cooking the heck out of it would take care of most biological hazards.

I was looking into small, individual pressure cooker. I like the idea of the pressure cooker because you can cook with less fuel, less water, and pretty much guarantee that you wipe out any viruses, parasites, bacteria, and so on.
I'm reminded of Cold Mountain, where starving Confederate soldiers (gone AWOL) ate a deer they found frozen to the ground. They all got sick. It's fiction, but it certainly comes to my mind. Ugh.


It isn't the germs and squigglies in rotting meat that worry me. You can cook those out.

It's what they leave behind.

Those things that start decomposing a dead body, are already inside basically all living creatures.
They create chemical toxins, that are to deadly to living cells.

Some of those decaying compounds are similar to neurotransmitters.
Others break down your internal organs.

Cause blood pressure to drop, and
start myocardial degereation. Your heart swells up and dies.
Some compounds keep the structure of celluar DNA intact, in tiny amounts.


You can't cook them out with heat.
Need acid, like a buzzard's gut.

Eating rotted out meat, is eating neurotoxins, poisons your organs, and breaks down the blueprint directions for human cells to operate properly.


So don't eat rotted meat if you don't have to. :D::D::thumb:
 

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Anarchist/Animist Primate
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Eating rotted out meat, is eating neurotoxins, poisons your organs, and breaks down the blueprint directions for human cells to operate properly.


So don't eat rotted meat if you don't have to. :D::D::thumb:
That's why I said it depends on the meat's condition. I little "aged" is okay. Actually rotting or rotted? Not a chance. Might be a good idea to stock up on Tobasco sauce though. ;)
 

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i saw a show about Jewel, the singer and she said when she was in Alaska, her family was on the "road kill list." because the animals froze after impact, the meat didn't go bad, so the poor were given the roadkills. that was her story, I don't know.

Me personally, I can eat a whole lotta vegatables before i get the urge to eat a road kill.
 
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