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the Lone Star Hiking Trail.

Any of you Texas folk ever been backpacking/camping on this trail in the Sam Houston National Forest?
Thinking about heading there in January for a trip and trying to decide what part to spend our weekend on. Probably 1 or 2 nights out.
 

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Not something I generally think of when I think of SH state park summer is too dang hot to do it and fall the hunters around the are scare me, some are not the most picky about shooting a moving object. Seems to have some trails though
Here is off of their web site.

Hiking - Hiking is a popular way to enjoy the forest and its beauty. The 128-mile Lone Star Hiking Trail, a portion of which has gained National Recreation Trail status, winds through the Sam Houston National Forest. The trail, marked with two-inch by four-inch aluminum markers to guide hikers, has recreation areas available at three different points. Except during deer hunting season when camping is restricted to designated camps, primitive camping is allowed off the trail. Potable water is available at Double Lake and Stubblefield recreation areas.

Lone Star Hiking Trail consists of three major sections. The 40-mile Lake Conroe section, lying west of Lake Conroe, begins near the intersection of FS 219 and FM 149 and has four connecting loops.

The Central Area of the trail runs eastward from Stubblefield Recreation Area, through the Four Notch area to Evergreen and then south down FM 945 to the trailhead parking lot. The Four Notch Loop, a 9.2 mile section, is in the middle of this 60-mile area of trail. The Winters Bayou/Tarkington Creek Area of the trail runs from FM 945 east to Double Lake Recreation Area, then south through Big Creek Scenic Area and then southwest through Winters Bayou. This 27-mile section of the trail has National Recreation status.

The Lone Star Hiking Trail may be hiked year round, but winter and spring are the most popular seasons due to the mild southeast Texas climate. During deer hunting season in November and December, hikers should wear highly visible clothing. Usually the trail is not crowded, and hikers may observe a multiple-use managed forest with many ages and kinds of trees, plants and wildlife. Trail visitors may also view rivers, creeks, lakes and streams that meander through and around the Sam Houston National Forest. Off-road vehicles are prohibited.
 

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I was there years ago and the part of the forest I was in was devoid of landmarks as it was totally flat and all pine trees. Plus the weather was foggy overcast so the sun did not throw a shadow, which screws up my sence of direction.
 

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That sounds like a standard day there. Bring a gps or compass or wander for days:D: Soon as deer season is over I think I will be taking a hike there.
 

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I'm new to the site but not SHNF I've bowhunted both side's of 45 for a few years now and love it all there's alot more to it than pine tree's you just have to dig it as far as hunter's scaring any one the general camps are closed at that time for a reason. join in or let the hunters have their time short as it is.
 
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