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All the urban survival fiction books seem to focus on the east coast or midwest as if that's most of the USA. Ha they have no idea the variety on the west coast past SLC!

How safe would Oregon be during a lock down? The left have pretty much total control over all media now and the internet is literally cable TV 2.0 now with all my favorite websites not working and old posts have dead links now too. It's all subscription BS which the left should be ashamed of as they were originally against all this crap! What happened?

Would Central/Eastern Oregon be better like Bend/Redmond,La Grande,Pendleton,etc due to the towns being far apart or would they all be out of water before you could say 'Bobs your Uncle?' We last went to Bend and talked to the airport guy their (long story) and he said how much he missed rain back in the 2013-15 drought they had almost no rain and rural areas were already on water rations in April which is when we went. We almost moved their to get away from the crap here but circumstances forced us to change our minds though I have been mad at God ever since and want to drive a cross thru him for shutting our way. :taped:

Where would the Conservatives migrate too whom have survival packs (small or large?) East or west where it's milder along the coast? How safe would the coat be? It doesn't get below freezing much except during Artic Air events. Coos Bay has a record low in the single digits ironically and Newport has a low near 0F but highs hardly go beyond 86F and the geography isn't very steep for the most part.

Do you think anywhere along the coast would be a good bug out area? And if so northern or southern coast? I think northern has higher population but the southern has had a lot of fires recently in the summer.


Would in Oregon it even be worth going on the run AT ALL? :confused:

We don't have anything unusual go on in the news here except whenever Kate Brown does something REALLY stupid like she almost did to the truckers whom many fought back so she backed off I can't remember what it was though due to all this Trump hate crap.

We once had a military target in Pendleton that made poison weapons but that was shut down back in the Bush erawhen the town fought back the plants making poison gas weapons and the town went all NIMBY and for very good reason too.

The ONLY possible military target might be our capital but on 9/11 it NEVER EVEN WAS SHUT DOWN (except for a brief bomb threat that lasted 1 hour which could've happened anytime by some yahoo) but all the workers stayed thru the whole 9/11 scenario even though they were told they could take paid leave without penalty to deal with the crisis.

All the while the rest of the nation over reacted putting barricades everywhere in areas not really needed just for show but for us it was just another Tuesday for the most part and school only had a brief moment of silence but it was a normal school day with no classes cancelled.

God I always wondered where they even got barricades so fast on 9/11 it was like they were there just for such an occasion despite our nation 'not being ready' or something like that. I wonder if Y2K did it? I wonder how we would've handled 9/11 without prepping for Y2K or Y2K happened 9/11 would not and half of us would've starved to death?

When we have massive snowstorms (as in 3 inches) we shut down far worse though ironically our last snowstorm in 2017 there were no accidents except a few stalled vehicles over the big bridge while Portland school kids were stranded overnight in many cases and vehicles spun out everywhere. Portland handles things worse then anywhere else in Oregon so I do know that's a NO go zone but there are also lots of independent suburbs AROUND Portland each with it's own mayor and police force.

Clackamass is mostly family oriented and look and feel NOTHING like the ultra left Portland and you rarely see hippy punks or people that would scare your kids away.
 

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All the urban survival fiction books seem to focus on the east coast or midwest as if that's most of the USA. Ha they have no idea the variety on the west coast past SLC!
I think its because a survivalist story set in a good place to survive would be kind of boring or at least harder to write so that it wasn't boring.

That being said, "Dies the Fire" takes place in eastern Oregon, Western Montana, and Northern Idaho and is one of my favorite books. If you're looking for post-apocolyptic oregon fiction you can't do better IMO.

Anyway, its been a while since I've been there, but I was born in Dayville OR and it seemed a pretty good spot the last time I was there.

Willamette would be ideal...but only after it got emptied out.
 

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May have changed since I lived there, but anywhere but close to the coast is pretty good to avoid leftism. Like almost every other State the brainwashed lemmings live in the cities. Gardening is good most anywhere, but west of the Cascades would require irrigation in many places. Elevations less than 3-4000 feet and you can grow about anything.
 

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oring.

That being said, "Dies the Fire" takes place in eastern Oregon, Western Montana, and Northern Idaho and is one of my favorite books. If you're looking for post-apocolyptic oregon fiction you can't do better IMO.
Great book, but avoid the crappy sequels.
 

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Great book, but avoid the crappy sequels.
Although the first one was the best by far, I still thought they where pretty good up until about book 5, but even the later ones had parts that I liked.

The first three are all that you really need to read though. I swear most of the characters are based off people I know.
 

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Mel Tappan gave numerous reasons for his selection of southwest Oregon. Rural, water, prevailing wind safety from fallout...IIRC he lived near Rogue River, so with I-5 I'd bet on going west from there.

Going the other way, I once knew a river-guide gal from Joseph, Oregon. She said that the road ended there.
 

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I apologize for being TOTALLY off topic here but since you are all familiar with the state and I am very new - Medford area.

Where can you buy Bulk dry goods? I haven’t been able to find a 40-50 lb. bag of rice, beans, anything.. I left my food storage with my brother when I moved so I need to resupply on the cheap and DIY is the only way.

Any Ideas?
 

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Mel Tappan gave numerous reasons for his selection of southwest Oregon. Rural, water, prevailing wind safety from fallout...IIRC he lived near Rogue River, so with I-5 I'd bet on going west from there.

Going the other way, I once knew a river-guide gal from Joseph, Oregon. She said that the road ended there.
Southwest Oregon is extremely isolated compared to most of Oregon, extremely rough, steep canyons, wild fires are seriously bad, but the weather is decent, water is there, small garden plots will grow, as long as you avoid the pot growers and other bug outers...it could be good.

I’d go to someplace like Chemult, or up near Crater Lake. Further East has pockets of good places, but it can be dry.
 

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I apologize for being TOTALLY off topic here but since you are all familiar with the state and I am very new - Medford area.

Where can you buy Bulk dry goods? I haven’t been able to find a 40-50 lb. bag of rice, beans, anything.. I left my food storage with my brother when I moved so I need to resupply on the cheap and DIY is the only way.

Any Ideas?
Winco on Bartlett road.
 

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I apologize for being TOTALLY off topic here but since you are all familiar with the state and I am very new - Medford area.

Where can you buy Bulk dry goods? I haven’t been able to find a 40-50 lb. bag of rice, beans, anything.. I left my food storage with my brother when I moved so I need to resupply on the cheap and DIY is the only way.

Any Ideas?
Not do it yourself, but the LDS bishops storehouse in White City (Pacific Ave) is open to the public on Wednesday’s 3-6pm.

Price wise, not comparable to bulk purchase & do it yourself repack. With some exceptions.

Powdered milk as an example. About the best value AFAIK.

Costco powdered milk used to be, but that was a while back. Not sure if there bulk buckets are still available. Never was in stores (that we’ve been to), but could get it shipped to home.

LDS powdered milk is envelope packaged (case purchased), so easier to deal with when using smaller quantities.

Also, there’s a Cash & Carry / Smart Foodservice in Medford (Cardinal Ave). We’ve yet to check it out, but used to shop the Salem one a bunch when we lived up that way. Pretty decent deals.
 
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Not do it yourself, but the LDS bishops storehouse in White City (Pacific Ave) is open to the public on Wednesday’s 3-6pm.

Price wise, not comparable to bulk purchase & do it yourself repack. With some exceptions.

Powdered milk as an example. About the best value AFAIK.

Costco powdered milk used to be, but that was a while back. Not sure if there bulk buckets are still available. Never was in stores (that we’ve been to), but could get it shipped to home.

LDS powdered milk is envelope packaged (case purchased), so easier to deal with when using smaller quantities.

Also, there’s a Cash & Carry / Smart Foodservice in Medford (Cardinal Ave). We’ve yet to check it out, but used to shop the Salem one a bunch when we lived up that way. Pretty decent deals.
Do you mean powdered milk or instant milk? I've been shopping at COSTCO for some 40 years and I have never seen powdered milk. Maybe LDS storehouses have changed in 10 years but they used to have powdered milk, only. Lasts much longer but harder to mix up.

Don't ever fall for buying Morning Moo out of Utah. Tastes great but hard and colored after 5 years even in a #10 can with humidity resistant pack.
 

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What to you expect to happen during martial law that you feel you need to avoid it?

I think that the more rural you can get the less martial law would effect you, simply because there isn't enough manpower to put the entire country under martial law and the focus would be higher density population areas.
 

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Having driven to many places in Oregon, I would avoid the Coast. Pretty and great climate, lots of rain and possibility of Cascadia earthquake. Bend area, high desert and cold south to Klammath Falls. I liked going east frpm Prineville on 26. At Mt. Vernon go either east to Baker City or north on 395 to Pilot Rock. Very few people and no interstates. La Grande to Enterprise isn't bad. Low population, lake and river. Forget S.E. Oregon, the empty quarter.
 

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What to you expect to happen during martial law that you feel you need to avoid it?

I think that the more rural you can get the less martial law would effect you, simply because there isn't enough manpower to put the entire country under martial law and the focus would be higher density population areas.
What is happening in Virginia is a perfect example how martial law will not work IF YOU ARE IN THE RIGHT PLACE. County sheriffs do not answer to the feds. or the state. They are elected by people in the county. AND, until we have huge change, county sheriffs are the highest law enforcement authority in that county.
 

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Do you mean powdered milk or instant milk? I've been shopping at COSTCO for some 40 years and I have never seen powdered milk. Maybe LDS storehouses have changed in 10 years but they used to have powdered milk, only. Lasts much longer but harder to mix up.

Don't ever fall for buying Morning Moo out of Utah. Tastes great but hard and colored after 5 years even in a #10 can with humidity resistant pack.
Yup, powdered milk.

Looks like they stopped carrying it. Was never in stores that we saw (East Coast & West Coast). Just online. Big bucket, ?? 25 lbs ??

LDS powdered milk notes 20 year shelf life, envelope packed, 12 28oz envelopes per case.

LDS online price ~$63. In store price ~$48.

https://store.churchofjesuschrist.org/usa/en/food-storage-3074457345616678849-1/nonfat-dry-milk
 
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