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Russia's defense minister says the military will deploy two army brigades to help protect the nation's interests in the Arctic.
Anatoly Serdyukov says his ministry is working out specifics, such as troops numbers, weapons and bases, but a brigade includes a few thousand soldiers.


Read full at: http://news.yahoo.com/russia-deploy-2-army-brigades-arctic-123709564.html
 

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Russia has more land mass inside the Arctic Circle than all others combined. Offshore drilling in their area of influence, along with land based horizontal drilling gives them the opportunity to grab access to oil reserves formerly unreachable due to ice pack.
 

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Information is Ammunition
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most of the arctic is water dude. :)
 
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Boarders are boarders, as long as everybody stays on their side of the line who cares. I figure they forgot how hard it is to maintain a military at -75.
 

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Figure about 800 men per battalion and about 4 or 5 battalions to a brigade. That would equal out to about 4,000 men per brigade. Total: about 8,000. Make them heavy brigades and you could be talking about 9,000 to 10,000 people final grand total. In that extreme cold, not enough to worry about at all. Figure that the ice cap is about 4 to 6 feet deep in winter with no land underneath it, a couple of well placed explosions among and around them and you have nothing to worry about at all.
 

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Russia has followed every UN rule and resolution to the letter in its quest to claim oil and gas lands in the Arctic, and may very well be successful in getting a UN resolution extending their border all the way to Canada. An estimated 100 Billion barrels of oil are at stake.

In early August 2007, traveling in a mini-submarine, members of Russia’s parliament planted their country's flag four kilometers (2.5 miles) below the North Pole at the climax of a mission to back up Russian claims to the region’s mineral riches.

Apparently the first expedition of its kind to reach the ocean floor under the North Pole, the aim was to establish if a section of seabed passing through the pole, known as the Lomonosov Ridge, is in fact an extension of Russia's landmass.
 
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