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Interesting story of Runaway slaves fleeing first to Florida, then fighting general Jackson during the Seminole wars, making peace and immigrating to the indian territories and then once the government reneges on their freedom, fleeing to Mexico for final freedom.

 

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I call BS.

Most people don't understand that the Indians OWNED slaves.

There is a CNN report about a Smithsonian exhibit that clearly documents the slaves that died on the trail of tears. These are not slaves being emancipated and helped by Indians, these slaves are the Indian's property. The Seminoles were forced on the trail of tears and took their slaves.

I think this is just a rework of history. I could be wrong but I highly doubt it is like this woman say it is. Did some Seminoles have sex with slaves, probably. Did some of those children grow to be free from slavery and a mixed of african and Seminole, most definitely.

Slavery is wrong, when whites owned slaves it was wrong. When Indians owned slaves it was wrong. When freed slaves owned slaves, it was wrong.

The last part of that video is laughable. Freedom fighter trek to the Oklahoma, my butt. Those Seminoles were being harshly forced to move by .gov and they took their slaves who suffered worse than they did.

A quick research show that the Seminoles since 1930 have excluded freedmen. Even wikipedia mentions the cycles of exclusion.
 

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I call BS.

Most people don't understand that the Indians OWNED slaves.

There is a CNN report about a Smithsonian exhibit that clearly documents the slaves that died on the trail of tears. These are not slaves being emancipated and helped by Indians, these slaves are the Indian's property. The Seminoles were forced on the trail of tears and took their slaves.

I think this is just a rework of history. I could be wrong but I highly doubt it is like this woman say it is. Did some Seminoles have sex with slaves, probably. Did some of those children grow to be free from slavery and a mixed of african and Seminole, most definitely.
I see no reason to doubt the facts as they were presented. What are you credentials. How much research have you done. There is a long history of blacks fleeing to Florida when it was under spanish rule and some of them fought with spanish. Those ended fleeing to cuba.
the seminoles were more recent arrivals to florida. There association with runaway slaves is well known.
The seminoles were not the Cherokee that took their slaves with them. At the time that they were moved, the cherokee were not fighting a war with the USA and some owned slaves. The Seminoles and black allies were. The cherokees were marched by troops and the journey was not by their own accord. i am not aware of the cherokee migrating in any numbers in to mexico.
As I understand the Cherokees were an Algonquin group from the north that went south working for the british as slaver of other indians in the late 17th and early 18th century.
https://www.google.com/search?q=origin+of+the+cherokee+tribe&client=firefox-b-1-d&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=9Z96JigQ2vp8UM%2CfT9abAYw25P78M%2C_&vet=1&usg=AI4_-kTDz4jawdN9sHZGUhOyk2385HmcrQ&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj2_u6TzvXxAhWQmOAKHfVCCa0Q9QF6BAgMEAE#imgrc=9Z96JigQ2vp8UM
The Cherokee Indians were one of the largest of five Native American tribes who settled in the American Southeast portion of the country. The tribe came from Iroquoian descent. They had originally been from the Great Lakes region of the country, but eventually settled closer to the east coast.
By the way there were freed blacks that owned slaves, there were creole people that owned slaves, and of course whites that did. Some indians did own slaves. To this very day there is racism within some local tribes near me. In southern alabama near the border the border with florida there is one band that is mixed with white and another band of the same tribe that is mixed with blacks. They do not get along with each other.
 

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My Hero Was Derion Albert
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there has never been a civilization in the history of the human race that did not enslave others. I don care what color your skin is, prior to Europeans the Indigenous population on the wester hemisphere were enthusiastically practicing slavery
 

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I call BS.

Most people don't understand that the Indians OWNED slaves.

There is a CNN report about a Smithsonian exhibit that clearly documents the slaves that died on the trail of tears. These are not slaves being emancipated and helped by Indians, these slaves are the Indian's property. The Seminoles were forced on the trail of tears and took their slaves.

I think this is just a rework of history. I could be wrong but I highly doubt it is like this woman say it is. Did some Seminoles have sex with slaves, probably. Did some of those children grow to be free from slavery and a mixed of african and Seminole, most definitely.

Slavery is wrong, when whites owned slaves it was wrong. When Indians owned slaves it was wrong. When freed slaves owned slaves, it was wrong.

The last part of that video is laughable. Freedom fighter trek to the Oklahoma, my butt. Those Seminoles were being harshly forced to move by .gov and they took their slaves who suffered worse than they did.

A quick research show that the Seminoles since 1930 have excluded freedmen. Even wikipedia mentions the cycles of exclusion.
I also recall hearing that Indian tribes would enslave other tribe members captured in battle, particularly squaws. The Indian casinos should be paying out reparations...
 

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I also recall hearing that Indian tribes would enslave other tribe members captured in battle, particularly squaws. The Indian casinos should be paying out reparations...
This may backfire, but I am going to ask nicely knowing you and indeed the majority of the population, probably aren't familiar with the origin of the word "squaw". While originally an Algonquian term for woman, and in Mohawk, vagina, it was during early colonization it came to mean something entirely different.
When a man was scalped for bounty it was called a scalp. The most valuable scalps were those of women who could bear children. How to tell if a scalp was male or female? They didn't take the hair from the woman's skull, but cut away her genitalia along with it to prove its authenticity. The term "squaw" was slang for that portion of a Native woman's anatomy, regardless if it was functioning or hanging from the wall in a tavern.

Please, please, reconsider your choice of words in the future.
 

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This may backfire, but I am going to ask nicely knowing you and indeed the majority of the population, probably aren't familiar with the origin of the word "squaw". While originally an Algonquian term for woman, and in Mohawk, vagina, it was during early colonization it came to mean something entirely different.
When a man was scalped for bounty it was called a scalp. The most valuable scalps were those of women who could bear children. How to tell if a scalp was male or female? They didn't take the hair from the woman's skull, but cut away her genitalia along with it to prove its authenticity. The term "squaw" was slang for that portion of a Native woman's anatomy, regardless if it was functioning or hanging from the wall in a tavern.

Please, please, reconsider your choice of words in the future.
Not sure where you heard that story but it seems it's not true.

[According to Dr. Marge Bruchac, an Abenaki historical consultant, Squaw means the totality of being female and the Algonquin version of the word “esqua,” “squa” “skwa” does not translate to a woman’s female anatomy]




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Some interesting history here: "...the Civil War erupted and the Seminoles as well as other members of the Five Civilized Tribes (Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Muscogee (Creek), took up arms and fought one against the other.

Under the agreement made with the Federal Government, the Seminoles were to be protected from outside invasion, but with the rumors of war, and before any battles were fought, the Government withdrew all of its forces, leaving the Indian Nations unprotected from invasion from the South.

About one-third of the Tribe, under the leadership of Big John Chupco, voted to remain loyal to the Union and proceeded to move to Kansas. The first skirmishes of the war took place when these Seminoles, along with other tribal members, who favored the North, fought three engagements to reach help in Kansas.

The remainder of the Seminoles under John Jumper joined forces with the Confederacy. The soldiers, with Colonel Jumper as their leader, fought under the command of General Stan Watie." Into the West - Seminole Nation Museum

"Watie commanded the First Indian Brigade of the Army of the Trans-Mississippi, composed of two regiments of Mounted Rifles and three battalions of Cherokee, Seminole and Osage infantry. These troops were based south of the Canadian River, and periodically crossed the river into Union territory.[citation needed]

They fought in a number of battles and skirmishes in the western Confederate states, including the Indian Territory, Arkansas, Missouri, Kansas, and Texas. Watie's force reportedly fought in more battles west of the Mississippi River than any other unit. Watie took part in what is considered to be the greatest (and most famous) Confederate victory in Indian Territory, the Second Battle of Cabin Creek, which took place in what is now Mayes County, Oklahoma on September 19, 1864. He and General Richard Montgomery Gano led a raid that captured a Federal wagon train and netted approximately $1 million worth of wagons, mules, commissary supplies, and other needed items.[18] Stand Watie's forces massacred black haycutters at Wagoner, Oklahoma during this raid. Union reports said that Watie's Indian cavalry "killed all the ******* they could find", including wounded men.[19]"

(19): Allardice, Bruce S. (2008) Kentuckians in Gray, p. 101, University Press of Kentucky. ISBN 978-0-8131-2475-9.
 

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Slavery was bad, no argument there, but it was acceptable at that time in history. Fortunately a lot of brave folks righted that wrong. But kicking the civilized tribes from their land makes little sense. After the War of 1812, most of the Eastern tribes were crushed and becoming dependent on the white man. It was a very odd thing that Jackson did to them, I still don't fully understand it.
 

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A couple yrs ago I attended a civil war battle reenactment in eastern Oklahoma. The battle was fought at Honey Springs, just south of Fort Gibson, and both sides were trying to control trade on the Shawnee Trail (aka Texas Road).

The Confederates had just crossed the Arkansas river, and the powder got wet, producing an incredible one sided conflict.

After loosing this battle, the south had to abandon Ft Smith, and their only supply route to Mexico, which was their primary source of imported goods.

Several indian tribes fought on both sides, but those supporting the south abandoned the war and moved south after the battle.
 

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Not sure where you heard that story but it seems it's not true.

[According to Dr. Marge Bruchac, an Abenaki historical consultant, Squaw means the totality of being female and the Algonquin version of the word “esqua,” “squa” “skwa” does not translate to a woman’s female anatomy]




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Careful there, I know several NA women of different tribes that would happily scalp you for refering to them as a "squaw". They take it as a insult.
 

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Don't fear the Reaper
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Read some firsthand accounts of how Zuni girls and women were captured and enslaved by the Navajo to weave. Zuni were expert at spinning and weaving, and that's alleged to be where the beautiful Navajo rugs got their start, being made by Zuni slaves.

I really enjoy historical posts like this. Very educational (except for the 'you don't know what you're talking about' type bickering) and a nice break from the usual posts.

Wish someone would put forth a serious post about the remnant wood and earth structures found throughout the southeast parts of the country, who made them, when, etc. Fascinating stuff.
 
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