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strikes to the left
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Discussion Starter #1
Okay. A Rossi Trifecta is a single shot, break barrel, rifle. It has a 18.5" .22LR barrel, a 22" 20gauge barrel, and a 22" .243WIN barrel. It is a youth rifle and can be broken down fairly easily. The barrels will change out in around 30 seconds. It also has a synthetic stock, which is ideal for setting it up jfountain2 style. The .22LR barrel has open sights (fiber optic), the 20 gauge has a standard bead, and the .243WIN has a weaver rail. In purchasing, the option is available to swap the .243WIN with a 22" .44 magnum barrel instead. MSRP around here is about $250.

Rossi Trifectahttp://www.rossiusa.com/whatsnew-trifecta.cfm

With that said, that is the research I've been able to discover on this neat little rifle. The biggest complaint I keep seeing, however, is that the .243WIN is not up to par as far as accuracy is concerned. I've seen no complaints on the .22LR (other than the cheap sights) and the 20 gauge. I saw no reviews on the .44 magnum barrel.

This is where you guys (hopefully) come in. I'm not looking at making 300 yard headshots with a rifle, but this is the impression I got when looking at those negative reviews. I could do with, say, a 4" grouping @ 100 yards. Will this rifle, chambered in .243WIN accomplish this, or would the better option be the .44 magnum? Also, any comparative reviews on the two rounds (such as kinetic energies) would be appreciated.
 

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I thought of this at one point. But, I think those basic calibers should be solidly kept to their own firearms.

You could end up with a shooter, but on average 300 yard headshots aren't going to happen. For a budget rifle, pick the Stevens 200. In a field shooting situation, it takes a good bit of practice to get that good at 300 yards. Your choice of a low recoil firearm is an easy weay to shoot well at long ranges. That is usually the desire in buying a .243 for hunting.

But, you need practice to do it. 223 is affordable practice if you do not reload. .223 should treat you well up to 300 yards. Past 200 yards, a good scope really shines.
 

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44 magnum is only a 150 yard round. Don;t know the specifics, but at 300 yards, expect the 44 magnum to drop about 4-5 feet. 300 yards is in the range of the .243.

44 magnum is around 1400-1600 fps. Average weight .243 is somewhere around 3000 fps.

If forced to choose the Rossi, I'd pick the 44 magnum. It's accuracy is in line with the range of the round. A slightly off hit is something a .44 cal 250ish grain hole can fix.

What do you own so far. Changing barrels can pot you a squirrel, but forget about changing barrels and getting large game. They'll be two ridges away by time you got the gun changed.
 

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strikes to the left
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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I'm looking at around 100 yards with a shot, be it the .243 or the .44mag. The reviews I read about this rifle were those of "it ain't got extreme accuracy, so I don't want it" type. I just felt that this rifle would be a mighty fine survival type rifle, but was looking for persons who have shot one before.

Honestly, I ain't looking to go too much beyond 100 yards with a shot. Do you know the velocity reduction for the rounds at this distance, possibly a bit beyond? If I take a shot at 100 - 150 yards, I want to be sure I put down what I'm shooting at.
 

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I found the trigger to be OK on a lightly used one. The 22lr barrel seemed to work OK for soda can accuracy at 50 yards. I was pretty new to shooting back them and was just plinking. For my knowledge of squirrel hunting so far, it would of worked fine.

As far as trajectory goes. IF you zero the gun the proper way and without any compensation for distance. A 240 grain 44 magum is a 150 yard gun. A 100 grain .243 is a 300 yard gun. they all will hit roughly in a 4 to 6" diameter circle.
 

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i think if your going to use 44. mag, why not use 20 ga instead with a slug, and then you can switch out to birdshot for small game very quickly.
 

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Preparing to be Prepared
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I too am looking at one of these Rossi setups, and found this thread. Hubb, did you end up buying one or trying it out? I was thinking of the .410 / .22, but the 20ga option sounds like a better bet. And putting the .243 in there too would seem to me to make this an awesome truck or bob gun.
 

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There are 4 in our household: 22/410, 22/20, 243/20 x2. For the money I think they are great. My only complaint is the sights, which is an easy fix. I agree the Stevens 200 is a great budget rifle except for the lack of iron sights in case of an optics failure.
 

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there are forums for single shot rifles, people there claim to get fantastic accuracy out of NEF/H&R, and just about as good out of ROSSI.
 

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Rossi Trifecta 243 barrel seems to overheat after 2 shots

My friend bought a Rossi Trifecta with .243 barrel for his sons. I attempted to help them sight it in; I couldn't get a good pattern with my usual 3 shots in 1 minute or so and then the shots jumped off the target, perhaps 10 inches. We returned that 3 to 9 power Tasco scope and got another one of the same model. Though the shots stayed on the paper the 3 shots varied by up to 10 inches at 100 yards with sandbags. I changed to one shot every 15 minutes on a cold (30 degrees F) day and got a pattern within about 2.5 inches. I adjusted the scope to move the pattern up about 4 inches and left about 4 inches and got a similar pattern about where I wanted it, at 1.75 inches above the bull's eye. The kid shot a deer at 40 yards right where he aimed.
 

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Where to start?

These little break-open weapons have actions that are not designed to handle a whole lot of pressure. Even if you do succeed in engineering one that will handle the pressure, the action / the very metal itself will deform during firing. It just will. A .243 is a necked-down .308. These calibers develop god-awful pressures. What's more, you aughta think about the .243 as being a short magnum (it isn't, but it is) -- the bore capacity vs. the case's powder capacity speaks to the round needing a 24" barrel (even a 26") if you wish to get the velocity potential out of it.

The .44 mag. has FAR less chamber pressure than a .243, so a little break-open action can handle this; plus, the .44 doesn't need a long barrel. OK, that being the case, note that the .44 mag and the .243 are totally different critters -- I can't begin to address the differences.

For a 100 yrd shot, the .44 will do -- loping trajectory, but it will certainly do 100 yard shots on deer-sized game. The sight-in for a .243 should be 200 yrds or greater -- this cartridge is capable of reaching out there a bit.

http://www.lasc.us/SAAMIMaxPressure.htm
 

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I was looking to get a Trifecta for my kids learner gun but the distributor was out of stock, so I paid a little more and bought the Pick-4. It is the slickest little rifle I've ever seen. Has 22, .410, 243, and 20g barrels. When the kids out grow it it will become the survival travel gun.
 

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Where to start?

These little break-open weapons have actions that are not designed to handle a whole lot of pressure. Even if you do succeed in engineering one that will handle the pressure, the action / the very metal itself will deform during firing. It just will. A .243 is a necked-down .308. These calibers develop god-awful pressures. What's more, you aughta think about the .243 as being a short magnum (it isn't, but it is) -- the bore capacity vs. the case's powder capacity speaks to the round needing a 24" barrel (even a 26") if you wish to get the velocity potential out of it.


http://www.lasc.us/SAAMIMaxPressure.htm
You have no clue!

I have put about 1200 rounds through my 30-06 Rossi in load test and development. I'll let you know when it melts and falls apart.
 

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I almost bought one with .22LR, 12ga, .30-30, and .45-70 barrels.

Ended up getting a pile of Savage 24s instead.

But I sure like the idea of stuffing the barrels into gun socks and keeping it all in the same case. Grab n' go, and if you change your mind about what gun you want when you get there, you've already got it.

But I like the utility of an over/under rifle/shotgun better. .30-30 over 20ga full choke is wonderful for when deer and turkey season are in at the same time. .22LR over 20ga cyl bore is wonderful for in the truck, esp. being a 18.5" takedown model with ammo storage in the buttstock.

On the other hand, with the Rossi W, you could put scopes on the rifle barrels and leave it off the shotgun barrel, a luxury not afforded on the M24... Not as much of a sighting compromise. ... But if you're looking at not much over 100yd shots, I think a peep sight with a decent small gold flat bead on the front does just as good as a scope. Maybe a little better target acquisition -wise.
 

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Father of 11 husband of 1
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We have a Trifecta. Youth model. I love the 20 gauge. The .22 works fine and the .243 is more than enough accurate for deer at 100 yards. YMMV

I would love for them to make a set with .17HMR(or .22 WMR), .38/357 and 20 gauge. Or for them to make a Wizard in a youth size. I would settle for this but just try to find it. I don't know anyone that can even order it.

http://www.rossiusa.com/product-details.cfm?id=85&category=3&toggle=&breadcrumbseries=
 

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If you dont plan to make longer shots than about 100 yards I would opt for the 44 mag given a choice. If you do your part it will anchor a deer at 100 yards just fine. I would choose the 20 gauge over the 410 no if ands or buts about it. The cost of the 20 gauge ammo over the 410 makes it more economical and offers you a lot more in the way of game getting options. If your on a budget and just starting out this aint a bad way to go!
 
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