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Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum
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Does anyone know if you can roast something like a turkey breast in one of those Coleman ovens? I know theyre good for baking cakes but im trying to sort Xmas out here without using electric. Coleman Packaway Oven : Amazon.co.uk: Sports & Outdoors
A Turkey Breast? YES
But not a turkey unless you did it in sections.

It's big enough to bake a pie, and there is ONE shelf.
Basically, you put it over a heat source, watch the thermometer and cook like any other oven.

Mom used ours in the house, over an electric burner when the oven was broken. Baked pie, roasted a chicken, etc. But it IS small.
Dad used the same one over a propane camp stove when camping in the summer.
It would work over hot coals too, but harder to control the temperature.
 

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Oh and whats a smoker?
That is a deep rabbit hole. Better question is how to smoke meat. The smoker has so many variations it could fill a book.
The process, however, is low and slow offset (usually) heat from smoking wood chips or charcoal.

My standard go-to recipe is 1/2 hr. per pound at 225 F. and either hard wood, Apple, Cherry, Pecan, Mesquite, Oak, but never a softwood like pine. You want indirect heat and bring the meat up to it's internal cooked temp, usually 160-185F depending on what it is, and there are other processes for greasy meats like ribs that use a cook, rest, cook method, not to mention the whole brining process for poultry.

I'm barely touching the surface and leaving a lot of details out, but it's honestly much easier than it sounds, and a smoker can be made out of everything from a metal drum, clay flower pots, a hole in the ground, old filing cabinet, old refrigerator, etc.
 

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More than .0001%
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Does anyone know if you can roast something like a turkey breast in one of those Coleman ovens? I know theyre good for baking cakes but im trying to sort Xmas out here without using electric. Coleman Packaway Oven : Amazon.co.uk: Sports & Outdoors
Sounds like you need a Sun Oven.
I found mine, brand new on Craigslist. I set it on my patio and had it up sligh over 350 without any issue.
 

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Hank Hill in Lingerie
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We had one of those Coleman ovens and we did bake in it. Biggest problem we had with it was that the heat wasn't even. The bottom of the oven near the heat source was significantly hotter than the upper oven.

We've owned and used a Sun Oven for decades. Pro tip: Sun Oven's proprietary stackable double pot with lid is worth the investment.

We have 2 different charcoal grills: a cast iron Lodge hibachi for burgers, steaks, hot dogs, etc and a Weber kettle grill with an S&S water reservoir insert for 'pit cooking,' roasting and smoking. We cook our own pulled pork BBQ and ribs and we roast whole chickens. Haven't done a whole turkey on it yet but we wouldn't hesitate.

The Lodge hibachi is a smaller footprint with a smaller grilling surface but you can use every millimeter of that surface. It heats very evenly and is a miser with charcoal.

We also have a Lodge cast iron frying pan and a Lodge cast iron Dutch oven with a lid that also fits on the frying pan. I use both plus my Calphalon cookware on top of our wood stove in the winter.

I'd roast a chicken in my Lodge or Calphalon Dutch oven or on the Weber kettle grill or in the Sun Oven before I'd bother with that Coleman oven.

Also, re: Sun Oven, most things cook more efficiently in a thin walled dark pot with a clear lid on it. Their proprietary double stack pot is pretty much perfect for that purpose.

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
We had one of those Coleman ovens and we did bake in it. Biggest problem we had with it was that the heat wasn't even. The bottom of the oven near the heat source was significantly hotter than the upper oven.

We've owned and used a Sun Oven for decades. Pro tip: Sun Oven's proprietary stackable double pot with lid is worth the investment.

We have 2 different charcoal grills: a cast iron Lodge hibachi for burgers, steaks, hot dogs, etc and a Weber kettle grill with an S&S water reservoir insert for 'pit cooking,' roasting and smoking. We cook our own pulled pork BBQ and ribs and we roast whole chickens. Haven't done a whole turkey on it yet but we wouldn't hesitate.

The Lodge hibachi is a smaller footprint with a smaller grilling surface but you can use every millimeter of that surface. It heats very evenly and is a miser with charcoal.

We also have a Lodge cast iron frying pan and a Lodge cast iron Dutch oven with a lid that also fits on the frying pan. I use both plus my Calphalon cookware on top of our wood stove in the winter.

I'd roast a chicken in my Lodge or Calphalon Dutch oven or on the Weber kettle grill or in the Sun Oven before I'd bother with that Coleman oven.

Also, re: Sun Oven, most things cook more efficiently in a thin walled dark pot with a clear lid on it. Their proprietary double stack pot is pretty much perfect for that purpose.

Hope this helps.
Yeah thats great thanks.
 

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Swirl Herder
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If you don't already have the Coleman gas stove to put that folding oven on, then maybe you should consider something specifically designed to grill and roast meat.

These Weber Q barbecues are well regarded and are a quality product that will last for decades. They can do a lot of different cooking jobs and they are very efficient in their gas use. Many people who have them, find a 20lbs gas cylinder lasts a year or more of weekend use. They will be more energy efficient than that folding oven, sitting on top of a Coleman stove.


If you want a solution that really is a prep, then look into wood fueled options.

Dutch ovens can be used to roast meat very effectively in a wood fuel camp fire. If you use a trivet, you can prevent uneven heat burning the bottom of the lump(s) of meat.

Dutch ovens can be made of cast iron, spun steel or even titanium.

The key to camp fire cooking of meat chunks is low and slow. Always use fire coals rather than raw flame.

A second hand cast iron dutch oven and trivet (from a second hand goods store) is probably the cheapest meat roasting option.

....or you can also buy new (Chinese made) ones on ebay:

 

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Sounds like you need a Sun Oven.
I found mine, brand new on Craigslist. I set it on my patio and had it up sligh over 350 without any issue.
I think you failed to note the British flag by the OP's name.

Distinct shortage of patios and long, hot, sunny days in the British Isles. Now if there were a nice rain and fog oven.... :D

Solar cooking isn't impossible in Britain, especially if you are in the more southern parts, but you'll need something a bit fancier than just a shiny reflector panel oven, and even then it may only work a couple of days out of the week. So, not the best plan as your only emergency cooking fallback.

A lot of places in the US, solar works very well. We had friends with a completely solar house in southern New Mexico built in the late 1950s. At most, you needed to keep a sweater on during a rare cloudy winter day, and there was always the wood fired adobe beehive oven for backup if you needed to roast a turkey on such a day.

Up here in the NE, though, the only solar oven I have is a hybrid electric-solar where a bit of juice can kick in and keep temps steady when the sun plays peek-a-boo. I regard it as more a giant slow cooker/food warmer than something I would depend on for cooking in a SHTF situation, although it could be a useful approach to keep energy use/cost down as an everyday cooker in less reliably sunny climes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
A Turkey Breast? YES
But not a turkey unless you did it in sections.

It's big enough to bake a pie, and there is ONE shelf.
Basically, you put it over a heat source, watch the thermometer and cook like any other oven.

Mom used ours in the house, over an electric burner when the oven was broken. Baked pie, roasted a chicken, etc. But it IS small.
Dad used the same one over a propane camp stove when camping in the summer.
It would work over hot coals too, but harder to control the temperature.
I will defo look into that. But why put one of these over a burner? The oven itself provides the heat. It sounds like cooking the oven? Please help me to understand im trying to survive and learn.
 

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I will defo look into that. But why put one of these over a burner? The oven itself provides the heat. It sounds like cooking the oven? Please help me to understand im trying to survive and learn.
It is not an oven - it is a metal box. As the web page says:
. The Coleman camp oven is designed to fit on Coleman liquid fuel and propane camp stoves and then folds down flat for compact storage.
Now, if you prefer a "real" oven, with burner built in:

However - I don't know if these are available in the UK. Perhaps something like this would work:
 

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Indoors, the only safe options are butane or alcohol stoves. Outdoors, you have many more fuel choices.
Roasting a turkey breast will take a long time, and even butane or alcohol will produce deadly carbon monoxide. I am not sure the OP understands how serious this can be.

There's a whole lot of difference between keeping a chafing dish warm at a wedding reception (in a big room with power, heat or A/C running), and roasting raw turkey in a normal-sized room without good ventilation.

Need 350 degrees for 2 or more hours - that's going to produce an awful lot of carbon monoxide. Outdoors is the only way.
 
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