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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone here ever adopted a retired military dog. I hears of a place in TX. That keeps these dogs until they are adopted. That's better then what they use to do with them when the didn't need them anymore. If anyone has can you share your experience.

Thanks,
-Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I just read an article the other day in the Stars and Stripes about this!

Here's a link to that days digital edition. ONce it loads, go to page 26
http://edition.pagesuite-profession...ID=ba8a7b0e-e747-4f8a-9ca4-9a2c52473bd5&skip=


Thanks Ranch girl. I'll check it out when I get home. It seems like a great ideal, from what I saw on the military web site last night that sponsors this Program its only at the AFB in Texas it's a long waiting list 12-18 mo. because there are a lot of good human beings out there who want these dogs for pets.

I always thought that the term "war dogs" ment mean tempered attack
Dogs ( because of my own ignorance ) after doing some research I was totally wrong.
There is alot of breeds ie; labs ( I have one now and he is a great dog ) beagles, dobermins, etc all types. And they are not just attack, guard dogs.
If some people don't know ( like I didn't ) they have various rolls ie; bomb sniffing, corps searching even moral. I still think it's a great idea and I'm on board. Btw if an when the SHTF it might be a good thing to have a dog with some of those skills. I'll stop preaching about in now. But if your a vet or still in the military or police force that works with dogs imwould love to here your
Stories.
 

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Must be just me - I tried the stars and stripes but all I found was pages of autos for sale.

It never occoured to me that a service man would just up and shoot his dog after that dog had protected him in war. I thought most truly loved their dogs. I always thought the canine program was a good thing, now maybe not so much. Guess I was just stupid enough to think that when a dog was retired, he got to do just that. That some solider, would take him home and give him the love and security that he deserved for serving our country. When I can stop crying, I will research this, and decide how much I can do to help right this wrong. Guess I need to tell the hubby to expect a new addition soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Must be just me - I tried the stars and stripes but all I found was pages of autos for sale.

It never occoured to me that a service man would just up and shoot his dog after that dog had protected him in war. I thought most truly loved their dogs. I always thought the canine program was a good thing, now maybe not so much. Guess I was just stupid enough to think that when a dog was retired, he got to do just that. That some solider, would take him home and give him the love and security that he deserved for serving our country. When I can stop crying, I will research this, and decide how much I can do to help right this wrong. Guess I need to tell the hubby to expect a new addition soon.
I'm not to sure about the shooting the dog thing, I only looked at 2-3 articles about this. What I saw was back in the day in wars past some or most of the dogs were left behind or " humanly euthanized " what I was reading is in wars past the dogs were treated more like a tool then a dog by the military but I'm sure the handlers thought alot different. Some stories I was reading the dogs were treated like gold by most of the troops because in battle situations the men can get sleep with a dog close by because no matter how tired a dog is it's more alert and can detect enemies way before a human can.

But in modern wars I'm sure ( I hope ) the dogs are treated much better these days. When they retire they are sent to an Air Force Base near San Antonio TX
I think that's where it is. I even saw an article about the wounded dogs have thier own rehab hospital like a Walter Reed hospital for dogs. Talking about making a grown tear up. I guess I just have a soft spot for dogs.
 

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In the military news overseas here, I see a lot of stories about dog handlers being killed while deployed. A few families were successful in getting the working dog an early retirement to live with the deceased's family. I think that's a great program- I know it would give me some comfort to have the dog that my husband/son/daughter/etc was so close to
 

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Military Working Dogs

Hope to clear up some of the questions regarding MWDs. The program started in 1942 by a women. 17,000 dogs saw active service in WWII and most dogs were returned to their handlers or civilians after the war. In 1952 the military designated MWDS as "equipment." and none were retired to civilian life after hat date. In Vietnam 4,000 dogs served, prevented over 10,000 casualties, yet only 220 were returned to the states. The rest were turned over to the South Vietnamese or euthanized. In 2000 President Clinton signed into law requiring suitable MWDs to be retired to civilians. I acquired Lucy (N430) in January 2010. A 3 year year-old German Shepherd she couldn't work on slick floors. Great for me! I even flew from Boston to Lackland AFB Texas to get her. The straight "attack" dog is history. Most are patrol and used as detectors but can attack on command. The majority are just detector dogs, GSD, Belgian Malinois, retrievers. Hope this info helps! ARF! Mike Lemish/MIlitary Dog Historian/www.K9writer.com
 

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Isn't there a military dog cemetary somewhere - thought it was on Guam?
 
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