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Just a little bit crazy
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so, my son got an bearded dragon lizzard last year. I was talking with my wife last night and it came up what would we do if the power was out. Does anyone know of an indoor solution to keep the lizzard warm, all I could think of was good old body heat sharing.

TIA

Mark
 

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what are you going to do to keep your family warm if the power goes out? eff the lizard...you need to worry about keeping everyone else heated.

have everyone in the family sleep in the best insulated room in the house using a tent-safe heater to keep everyone warm. bring the lizards housing into the same room, close to the heater. voila. problem solved. they can deal with temps of about 60' if it isnt for a prolonged period of time.
 

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Non semper erit aestas.
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Make sure he has good ventilation, and put bubblewrap around the vivarium and part of the top (again he needs ventilation).

If you have a room-safe heater do as infinityshock said above.

Your reptile shop owner might have some good ideas too, also those on reptile forums who have weathered ice storms and the like, will likely have good advice.

(We used to have a Yemen chameleon.)
 

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Handwarmers, preferably the larger 4x6" ones. At the end of the season they go on clearance at most stores and last a few years. They hold heat for up to 6 hours, and its not a heat that will hurt the Dragon like some heat rocks can do.
 

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Handwarmers, preferably the larger 4x6" ones. At the end of the season they go on clearance at most stores and last a few years. They hold heat for up to 6 hours, and its not a heat that will hurt the Dragon like some heat rocks can do.
the chemical reactions that create the heat are very uncontrolled in some of the cheaper brands of heating pads. even the more expensive name-brand ones arent something id trust with an important pet. as a side note, bearded dragons like things a bit on the toasty side for their basking spots and arent as susceptible to inadvertently frying themselves as are some other reptiles. like. um. frogs. not that i would know or anything.
 

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Indefatigable
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I think the handwarmer sounds pretty good. Maybe put him a large fanny pack with the warmer in an outside pocket. Between that and your body heat, he might make it. I understand wanting to take a pet. There is no way I would leave my dog behind, not much chance for her survival if left on her own. The reptiles however would have far better chances of survival if set free.
 

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so, my son got an bearded dragon lizzard last year. I was talking with my wife last night and it came up what would we do if the power was out. Does anyone know of an indoor solution to keep the lizzard warm, all I could think of was good old body heat sharing.

TIA

Mark
my votes some vegetables a stick and a grill

kebabs are great :thumb:
 
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The reptiles however would have far better chances of survival if set free.
never, ever, under any circumstances set an animal loose after being a 'pet' whether its something like an indigenous squirrel or as foreign as an exotic reptile. there are far more reasons not to do this than i can describe in an internet post but some of the more simple ones:

- indigenous animals that have been a pet may have lost the ability to forage/hunt for its own food or protect itself from predators. another possibility is it will enter into an established food chain which it will be disrupting.

- non-indigenous animals may not have the physiology to survive in the local environment. they could lack acceptable food or the ability to adjust to the climate. they would then become a meal for the local wildlife or simply die due to malnutrition or freezing/cooking.

- non-indigenous animals that are released into a climate similar to their own native habitat will become a threat to native wildlife, whether its as a competition for local food sources or as a predator. or prey.

there are countless examples of animals being released that have had a seriously detrimental effect on the local environment...google it.

releasing a pet is never an option. either humanely euthanize it or use it as food. most cooked reptile ive tasted isnt too bad...tastes like cheek-en. and is supposedly relatively healthy and low in fat content.
 

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the chemical reactions that create the heat are very uncontrolled in some of the cheaper brands of heating pads. even the more expensive name-brand ones arent something id trust with an important pet.
You can always put a thin piece of slate over the heating pads so it distrubutes the heat more evenly.
 

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I had 2 bearded dragons as a kid living in Maryland. I had an outdoor cage I liked to Put them in on the porch. Well one day my mom put them in but didn't latch the door tight and one escaped. Now this was late summer and we don't exactly have mild winters so the vet said there's no way he could survive. Flash forward through a snowy winter and spring and come that next summer I'm out mowing the yard driving down the fencelne and what do I see but a bearded dragon on the fencepost. He had grown a good deal and gained all the beautiful reds and oranges you always see in pictures. I couldn't believe it. He just let me pick him up and I put him back in his tank with the other one. You'd be surprised how resilient they are
 

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Flash forward through a snowy winter and spring and come that next summer I'm out mowing the yard driving down the fencelne and what do I see but a bearded dragon on the fencepost. He had grown a good deal and gained all the beautiful reds and oranges you always see in pictures. I couldn't believe it. He just let me pick him up and I put him back in his tank with the other one. You'd be surprised how resilient they are
Thats impressive!
 

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Pull up your Dora panties
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one thing you can do is get one of the heater pakcs you warm up in the microwave. they hold heat for 8 hours, if you run a generator, then you can pop it in the microwave for a few minutes. i use these for my coatimundi.another thing i use is 1 gallon, or 2 liter bottles full of hot hot hot(not quite, but close to boiling) water. this will hold heat for 6 hours if insulated. wrap a towel around it. last thing i will mention, but the first thing i would do is this. either move the lizard to a smaller cage(like a 10 gallon instead of a 50 gallon) or put it into a small tupperware container. i have used shoe box size for up to 3 days for hurricane evacuations. just make sure there are air holes.some dont seal well, so you dont need to make holes. if you keep the animal in an aquarium, wrap it in an insulating material like bubble wrap or towels. also cover most, or all of the top so heat does not escape.

one more thing, lizards are cold blooded, and they will go into a form of hybernation when very cold. they will appear dead. dotn immedatly assume they are. you can warm them back up(slowly) using body heat, or just by bringing them into a warm area. i have had iguanas out doors over night in below freezing weather. i placed him inside my sweatshirt, and 15 minutes later i had one very angry igauna that i was very happy to have bite me. my wife and i have raised hundreds of reptiles, and owned an exotic animal company if you have other questions let me know. beardies are my fave. i breed them for years.
 
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