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You Cant Eat ......
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i just harvested my garlic crop (planted it last september or so) and i definitely got a decent harvest.

i am taking a stab at trying to get my garden as self sufficient as possible and would like to replant the bulbs..

My question is, can i split the bulbs now into cloves and replant or do i need to wait until the fall to do this.

Regarding storing the rest of the garlic. I have it hanging in the basement where it is cool. Is there anything else i need to know regarding the storage of it?
 

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Tell the truth, coward.
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i just harvested my garlic crop (planted it last september or so) and i definitely got a decent harvest.

i am taking a stab at trying to get my garden as self sufficient as possible and would like to replant the bulbs..

My question is, can i split the bulbs now into cloves and replant or do i need to wait until the fall to do this.

Regarding storing the rest of the garlic. I have it hanging in the basement where it is cool. Is there anything else i need to know regarding the storage of it?
store it hanging if you can. Dry and dark. As you are doing - but be sure it's dry before you forget about it. it does need to dry out a few days to get a skin on the cloves before it's put away.

I wouldn't split the cloves yet but others may have a different view. Look at the garlic now: which is the biggest and healthiest? That is the one you will want to keep for growing. Always save the best for reseeding.

As to splitting, I don't till it's plant time but it may actualy be a good idea... I don't know! :) I wouldn't replant now but hey - you could try some and see if it yields better cloves. i've never tried.

Normally one plants garlic on the shortest day. If it snows heavily in winter where you live plant before the first frost. This means that their biological clock will go 'TICK' and start it growing when the temperatures say to in early spring.
 

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One year I planted some garlic I had grown. The next year I grew beautiful stalks but no cloves of garlic developed.

I was told that it would not grow properly in the same kind of soil. That is why California and Oregon trade garlic cloves back and forth?

Let us know if you have luck. I was thinking of planting the seeds.
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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You can safely re-plant at any time.

Choose the biggest bulbs to use in your replanting.

Inspect them for signs of mold or fungus, do not replant any with mold.

It is perfectly okay if they start growing again this year, garlic over-winters. The 'new' plants establish roots now, it will help them next spring to get a leap on that growing season.

If you let any garlic go to seed-head, let the heads dry for a month, then shake out the seeds. Those seeds can be planted at any time. But in their first year they will only make chives [no bulbs]. Growing from seed or corm will take two years before a crop. Also the garlic that you use to make seed with, do not pull those plants up. Their bulbs will be tiny. Let them stay in the ground to over-winter. Next year, if you remove the new scapes, they will push out big bulbs and then you can harvest some nice bulbs from them.

When you inspect the bulbs look for corms. Pull them off, they can be replanted as well, but again they will require two years.

Keep in mind that to make bigger bulbs you must remove all scapes as they form.

If you had bought a specific strain of garlic that you liked but say it was terribly expensive. Then you could let 1/3 or 1/2 your bed make scapes and eventually seed heads. Those seeds will propagate your two dozen garlic plants into two hundred garlic plants. So it is the way to rapidly expand your production, but it requires two years.
 

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You Cant Eat ......
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
question about harvesting. The guy told me how to plant them said you harvest when it the stems dry up and turn brown.

Are you snipping the heads off early so they do not get heads on them and then waiting for them to brown?
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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When the head first starts to form, it will often curve down and make a loop.

If you keep that on, then much of the energy of the plant will go toward producing seed.

If you cut it off when it is still the diameter of a pencil, it is called a scape and can be marketed for it's strong garlic flavor. Once the scape is removed the energy of the plant is then diverted into making a large bulb.

Often the difference between tiny bulbs and large bulbs is if the plant was trying to produce seed.


Some garlic tops will turn brown and lay-down. These are 'soft-neck' garlic, which can be braided if you catch them before the necks turn brittle.

The other garlic is 'hard-neck'. Which means that the tops will stay upright and stiff right up to when it is covered by snow. Hard-necks are not usually braided [because they are not pliable].

Some of our garlic we allow to go to head, so that we produce seed.

Most of our garlic we do not allow to go to head, so they produce bigger bulbs.

Our soft-neck garlic will lay-down, our hard-neck garlic does not.



When you pull your garlic up, inspect the roots. If you find nodes, the size of your pinky tip, round-like, these are corms.
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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why please tell me why no one uses all those seeds from the seed pod right on top of the f****ng plant
Garlic does not produce seed in a single 'pod', there is like a star-burst flower that has dozens of little heads, each holding seeds.

You can not say that 'no one uses' garlic seed, we use their seeds.

However a garlic plant that produces seed is not producing a large bulb.

Dividing a bulb into component cloves is one method of propagation. Garlic has three primary methods of propagation.

Dividing the bulb's cloves is technically cloning. The new crop of plants will all share the same exact DNA sequences.

Allowing some garlic plants to produce seed [instead of bulbs] will allow the gardener to produce some genetic variety in his beds.

If you wanted a deeper purple, or a shinier silver, or a brighter white; then you could breed and select for these traits.

Our garlic are whites, reds, purples and elephants. :)
 

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You Cant Eat ......
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
thanks, that is really helpful. I let all my garlic go to the head. Since they stand straight up, i guess they are the hardneck variety.

I have the heads drying in my barn now and should have some seeds ready for planting shortly.

i definitely like this variety of garlic and am hoping to keep a nice crop of it going year to year
 

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I did not know that garlic was suppose to be planted in the fall. I bought whole garlic and broke the cloves apart and planted each piece. The plants are healthy but the cloves are not very big. Can I just leave them in the ground for next year in hope of the cloves getting bigger next year?
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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I did not know that garlic was suppose to be planted in the fall. I bought whole garlic and broke the cloves apart and planted each piece. The plants are healthy but the cloves are not very big. Can I just leave them in the ground for next year in hope of the cloves getting bigger next year?
Yes, you can simply leave them in the ground.

If any of your garlic did make seed heads, you can remove those heads this fall and process the seeds.

Next summer, watch for heads forming and cut them off. That fall you should have some nice large bulbs.

:)
 
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