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"eleutheromaniac"
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Discussion Starter #3
This is a (somewhat rare) Newhaven, Conn. Classic Stainless, and being a featherweight, I want to keep it towards the lite side. I am going to sell it, and it will bring a much better price with a higher quality stock.
 

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"eleutheromaniac"
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Discussion Starter #5
Wood is very nice.......but for this project it will be a composite stock. Hunters in Alaska who are the market for this barreled action will demand composite stock. This will be an "Alpine Environment" Rifle.
 

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I think people simply don't understand the Alaska market. Unless someone is looking for an antique to hang on a wall display, it is very hard to sell a gun with a wooden stock up here. A good light weight gun with a composite stock is what people look for due to the hostile hunting conditions (weather and the heavy brush) and the distances and elevations you need travel to get to your hunting location.
 

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"eleutheromaniac"
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Discussion Starter #9
Unless the stock is beat up or damaged why replace it, buying a new stock may not raise the value.
Good Question.

I have "Winter" firearms and "Summer" firearms. And a few that are both (Winter and Summer) but I have to change the stock for the different seasons.

If my preferred length of pull for summer is 13 5/8" that works with late spring-summer-early fall type clothing for the expected weather. Now put on arctic clothing for forty below zero and riding a snow machine hunting wolves, with 3" of parkas and snowsuits, a shorter length of pull works better. Plus my winter firearms want a white stock.

Also I am a retired Alaska Hunting Guide, and sometimes take young hunters afield who don't have a proper Alaska Big Game firearm, and I can loan them the short length of pull rifle for the duration of the hunt.

Also snow machines get rolled and the rifle is in a scabbard mounted on the machine, sadly the stocks often get broken off at the pistol grip. Better to break the cheap stock that comes with most rifles, and save the light weight composite ($350.00 to $600.00) stock for the high mountain country.
 

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I think people simply don't understand the Alaska market. Unless someone is looking for an antique to hang on a wall display, it is very hard to sell a gun with a wooden stock up here. A good light weight gun with a composite stock is what people look for due to the hostile hunting conditions (weather and the heavy brush) and the distances and elevations you need travel to get to your hunting location.
People understand. Synthetics have outsold wood for decades.

The point is that buying a new stock won't add anything to the cash value, and it won't make it easier to sell if it's not a stock the end buyer wants.

Just sell the rifle like it is, and then the new owner can get a stock they want, and one that fits their needs. Let them pay the shipping fees.

This is a (somewhat rare) Newhaven, Conn. Classic Stainless, and being a featherweight, I want to keep it towards the lite side. I am going to sell it, and it will bring a much better price with a higher quality stock.
 

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"eleutheromaniac"
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Discussion Starter #11
People understand. Synthetics have outsold wood for decades.

The point is that buying a new stock won't add anything to the cash value, and it won't make it easier to sell if it's not a stock the end buyer wants.

Just sell the rifle like it is, and then the new owner can get a stock they want, and one that fits their needs. Let them pay the shipping fees.
Never said I figured to sell it as soon as I restocked it. This is chambered in .243 Winchester and should be a good option for mounting the FLIR RS-64 Thermal Scope for post SHTF meat procurement.

And besides I had already shortened the factory stock to 11.5" LOP several years ago.
 

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Never said I figured to sell it as soon as I restocked it. This is chambered in .243 Winchester and should be a good option for mounting the FLIR RS-64 Thermal Scope for post SHTF meat procurement.

And besides I had already shortened the factory stock to 11.5" LOP several years ago.
I read exactly what you said, and the reason you gave for adding the stock.

Nothing I said changes based on any timelines, or based on any "alterations" you've done.

If it's "somewhat rare", any change from factory original lowers the value. Since you've already ruined the factory stock, nothing you can add will increase the actual cash value.

Selling it as is to someone looking for a child's rifle would be better.

Originally Posted by 6.8SPC View Post
This is a (somewhat rare) Newhaven, Conn. Classic Stainless, and being a featherweight, I want to keep it towards the lite side. I am going to sell it, and it will bring a much better price with a higher quality stock.
 

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"eleutheromaniac"
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Discussion Starter #14
I read exactly what you said, and the reason you gave for adding the stock.

Nothing I said changes based on any timelines, or based on any "alterations" you've done.

If it's "somewhat rare", any change from factory original lowers the value. Since you've already ruined the factory stock, nothing you can add will increase the actual cash value.

Selling it as is to someone looking for a child's rifle would be better.

In the interest of full disclosure.

I don't have even the slightest respect for your opinion about firearms or ballistics. I don't attribute any value to any advise you tender reference firearms, not to me or your advise to other members of this forum.

I often consider putting you back on "Ignore", however it is entertaining to see you constantly make an arrogant silly of yourself.
 

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In the interest of full disclosure.

I don't have even the slightest respect for your opinion about firearms or ballistics. I don't attribute any value to any advise you tender reference firearms, not to me or your advise to other members of this forum.

I often consider putting you back on "Ignore", however it is entertaining to see you constantly make an arrogant silly of yourself.
Patterns never change. :)
 

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I bought a new stock for my 1899 octogon barrel 30/30 Savage, but I keep the original in the event some one wants to buy it for a wall hanger.
I naver cast off original parts.
 
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