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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
A couple of months ago I found a Marlin 336 that had been made in 1976. The sights are pretty much useless in low light. So I thought about replacing them with something a little more modern.

The question I keep asking myself, should I mess with a rifle that was made in the 1970s?

In all honesty, the rifle is not "that" old. But it seems a shame to mess with the rifle. Then again, what is a little modernization going to hurt?

Midway USA has some truglo sights that have some poor reviews. so I do not want to go with them.

Suggestions?
 

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I found the same thing you did. Marlins stock buckhorn sights are worthless in low light. Nothing worse then sitting in a tree stand in the woods on a rainy evening, having a deer 50 yards away and not able to shoot due to poor sights.



I went with an XS sights peep\ rail set up. I dont recommend them if you dont plan to use a scope which is realy the purpose of the kit. I dont use a scope and am not happy with these peeps. Its not fine enough for accurate shooting at longer ranges because its just a ghost ring aperature.



Look into Skinner peeps or Williams peeps. Williams also makes a set of fiber optics that use the stock sights dovetail. Both give you the options for different peep aperatures that the XS kits lack.



Chris
 

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The fastest, easiest and cheapest option is to mount a low power scope.

The Marlin of that era is exceptionally accurate and needs a scope to round out its abilities.

You could even mount a red dot in the middle of a scope rail and put it on and take it off if you do not like the look of a lever gun with an optic hanging on your rack.

After 200 years of successful scope use and 100 years of using reflex sights it is about time the human population got over that issue.

Other than that just about any set of iron sights you pick will fit on that simple dovetail and screw it on system of both front and rear that Marlin used.
 

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Years ago, I ran a Williams rear sight on my 336.
As I got older, eyes not what they once were, an XS forward scope mount was added and a red dot perched on top.


http://www.xssights.com/Products.aspx?CAT=8291

Worth every penny.
 

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There are several choices you can make. A good receiver/peep sight with a prominent front sight. A good light gathering scope sight. I have several Marlins and use both types of sights. More and more I've come to prefer the scopes. The older (from that era) Weavers and Lymans are especially suitable for that style rifle. In my opinion (again I have several) in 2 1/2 and 4 power with a post and crosshair or a plain crosshair work very well in low light.

This should work very well in the Texas country you live in. One thing to remember is that it is a very simple matter to remove the scope and put the original sight back on whenever you choose. If you are planning to do night hunting, even a more modern red dot or illuminated reticle is just fine. Same story, it can be installed or removed at will.
 

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I lived in Chicago for some time and worked at Bosch tools. I met many germans.. ;) anyway because of the 'restrictive' gun laws as well as my desire to shoot I found the shooting club of the German cultural Center of Chicago.

On the top floor was a 10 meter shooting range ( and beer/sausage cheese and snack bar.. HOWEVER ONLY after you were finished practicing) with crank wind in /out target pulleys and really cool spring powered air rifles in .177 cal.

The oldest member was 87 years old and shooting competivly since she was 9. All of the 'older' shooters got to use a support whilst either standing or sitting. All of young bucks had to stand, support, shoulder and ssssteeaady these really fat heavy rifles. I had no leathers or anything like that.. just me and a tee shirt.

Peep sights.

For the application I mentioned above the system on my Mod. 380 Anschutz was a tiny apperture (sorry sp. For some reason I always get the vowel wrong) and ring inside a globe front sight. However with the 10m match target there were no rings to see.. and there were ten of them. there was a tiny black circle that fit within the front sight and then the front sight fit into the rear sight.

The human eye can align circles very well and this is how that system worked. Hold and steady was something else however I surprised myself at how well the system worked. Now peep sights for fire arms...

I tried peeps on my 336 30-30 and they were too rough for the range of the rifle. I tossed the same system you speak of and went scope. I did keep the front barrel ramp and hood ( no front blade) as the 336 looks wrong without it.

I DID however keep a peep system with my Win 94 trapper .38/.357 carbine. At this function of range and speed It Works... XS works on the carbine however in my opinion not for the range work that 30-30 is capable of.. I.E 100 to 150 yrds.. for that distance a smaller aperature and closer hold is needed. Maybe even a rubber eye piece to shade sunlight so all comes through the sights. Then you are too close for the recoil... Bang sight bite!!

However for close and dirty with a 30-30?? Hecks yes!! If I was hog hunting in serious brush?? ghost all the way

I say all of this to just say that application and use is how a system is set up. One does not do all just as an average can not do everything for all.
 

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The fastest, easiest and cheapest option is to mount a low power scope.

The Marlin of that era is exceptionally accurate and needs a scope to round out its abilities.

You could even mount a red dot in the middle of a scope rail and put it on and take it off if you do not like the look of a lever gun with an optic hanging on your rack.

After 200 years of successful scope use and 100 years of using reflex sights it is about time the human population got over that issue.

Other than that just about any set of iron sights you pick will fit on that simple dovetail and screw it on system of both front and rear that Marlin used.
I own more scopes and red dots than the average shooter, but an aperture sight, not mounted in the factory rear sight dovetail, but using the drilled and tapped mounting holes on the receiver of modern Marlins, is less expensive than a quality optic/mount combination, and easier to install. They are quite fast and very accurate, even in low light, more durable, and less prone to catching on things. And yes, more aesthetically pleasing on a classic lever gun for many.

Sometimes the old fashioned solution works just fine.


.
 

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I lived in Chicago for some time and worked at Bosch tools. I met many germans.. ;) anyway because of the 'restrictive' gun laws as well as my desire to shoot I found the shooting club of the German cultural Center of Chicago.

On the top floor was a 10 meter shooting range ( and beer/sausage cheese and snack bar.. HOWEVER ONLY after you were finished practicing) with crank wind in /out target pulleys and really cool spring powered air rifles in .177 cal.

The oldest member was 87 years old and shooting competivly since she was 9. All of the 'older' shooters got to use a support whilst either standing or sitting. All of young bucks had to stand, support, shoulder and ssssteeaady these really fat heavy rifles. I had no leathers or anything like that.. just me and a tee shirt.

Peep sights.

For the application I mentioned above the system on my Mod. 380 Anschutz was a tiny apperture (sorry sp. For some reason I always get the vowel wrong) and ring inside a globe front sight. However with the 10m match target there were no rings to see.. and there were ten of them. there was a tiny black circle that fit within the front sight and then the front sight fit into the rear sight.

The human eye can align circles very well and this is how that system worked. Hold and steady was something else however I surprised myself at how well the system worked. Now peep sights for fire arms...

I tried peeps on my 336 30-30 and they were too rough for the range of the rifle. I tossed the same system you speak of and went scope. I did keep the front barrel ramp and hood ( no front blade) as the 336 looks wrong without it.

I DID however keep a peep system with my Win 94 trapper .38/.357 carbine. At this function of range and speed It Works... XS works on the carbine however in my opinion not for the range work that 30-30 is capable of.. I.E 100 to 150 yrds.. for that distance a smaller aperature and closer hold is needed. Maybe even a rubber eye piece to shade sunlight so all comes through the sights. Then you are too close for the recoil... Bang sight bite!!

However for close and dirty with a 30-30?? Hecks yes!! If I was hog hunting in serious brush?? ghost all the way

I say all of this to just say that application and use is how a system is set up. One does not do all just as an average can not do everything for all.
Everybody has different needs and different abilities. Many of us can shoot out to 100-150 yards+ with good aperture sights quite effectively, even with larger, ghost rings. Minute of Deer is a piece of cake, out to the outer reaches of most lever gun cartridges like 30-30.
 

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i do not have a 336 so i cannot comment on specifically which sights to put on it, but i would like to say that a rifle you are afraid to reconfigure and modify to suit your leads is in my opinion useless.. if you like the rifle, and you do not plan to sell it, then do whatever you want to make it better suit your needs
 

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Cynical Thinker
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Option 1- Remove the front sight hood and apply some white out to the upper front post tip. The white will reflect and contrast vs. the ambient light nicely. The hood blocks light while offering protection to the front sight alignment.

Lever action rifles were designed for the times and environments they were expected to be used in. That being said; at some time in the very near future iron sights will stop working due to your catching up with old man time. Get ahead of the game, and get a scope. Practice leaving both eyes open to acquire your target and then closing the non magnified eye to take your shot.
 

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Check yer balance, Kev.

Last week I was shooting two Marlin levers, a 336 .44 magnum saddle ring (ordered more ammo this afternoon), a Williams peep (one of the cheap ones, 5D) bead on post missing hood.

Also, for grins, an 1895SS with the dratted safety, bead on post with hood in .45-70, same Williams peep. 405 grain factory load was SOFTER than the 300!

Left in the rack last week, a 336 pre-safety .30-30 with Skinner peep, hooded bead on post; and an 1894 .357 pre-safety, Williams peep, blade front with no groove for hood.

All four are fun guns limited in my hands by their cartridges, practical accuracy and sights. Distance dictated by power, shooter ability, target size and toughness.

The "balance" is distance, power, practical accuracy and target size. The Texas deer that graze in my Bexar County neighborhood have less meat on them than a good size Labrador. Any of these four rifles would take one cleanly within my accuracy limits of 100 yards or so. Feral hogs, I'd leave the .357 at home, and try to get within 75 yards with the .44. .30-30 and .45-70 should be safe to shoot pigs from 125 yards or so. The .357 would be a home with vermin at 50 yards: skunks, armadillo, opossum, **** (all of whom I've had in my suburban back yard).

My first centerfire rifle was a .30-30 Marlin made Glenfield that came with a 4x scope with tiny crosshairs that shot 1.5 MOA with factory Remington 170 grain SP. All my other Marlin lever guns have had iron sights.

These thoughts pertain to today's "peace time" climate in the USA, maybe Canada. In a survival situation, there are no expectations of legal restrictions or "fair hunt".
 

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As long as you use a direct replacement type sights and keep the originals no harm has been done and the change can be undone. Same thing if you add a scope. Keep the original plug screws safe then the rifle can be returned to as issued condition.
 

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Option 1- Remove the front sight hood and apply some white out to the upper front post tip. The white will reflect and contrast vs. the ambient light nicely. The hood blocks light while offering protection to the front sight alignment.

Lever action rifles were designed for the times and environments they were expected to be used in. That being said; at some time in the very near future iron sights will stop working due to your catching up with old man time. Get ahead of the game, and get a scope. Practice leaving both eyes open to acquire your target and then closing the non magnified eye to take your shot.
I was going to recommend similarly but with a glow in the dark paint
 

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I recently picked up a minty pre 64 winchester 94. For whatever reason I can still use the irons well enough for my purposes here on the Ozark National forest.

I'm thinking I'll continue to work with the standard sights for as long as possible. When my eyes do deteriorate I'll find suitable replacements like mebbe' some of the Marble front and rear sight replacements.

I'm aware of the superiority of scopes and red dots over irons but I do prefer them whenever feasible.
 

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on the 94s, I run a Lyman vernier tang sight, (post 64 rifles, you have to drill and tap 1 hole, a fold down lyman adjustable rear sight, and added a hood to my front sight. for some reason, the older your eyes get, the more the dish on the vernier tang helps.

a lil work, you could fit it to a marlin as well. Track of the wolf carries em. www.trackofthewolf.com or you can buy em from d\Dixie gun works,
at www.dixiegunworks.com
 

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