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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Took the new Remington 700 SPS 308, standard 24" barrell out today to see what I could do with it. This is the first high powered rifle I have owned in almost 10 years. Basically I haven't shot a large caliber rifle in that time frame as I got out of hunting only for a short time, but ended up being a long time.

Anyway, to the shooting. I shot the rifle at 50 yards to begin with after having it bore sighted when purchased on Tuesday. My rest was a 50lb bag of play sand I found lying around the house, and since the bag had mud on it, I laid an old sock on top of the bag to keep the dirt off the rifle. Would of liked to shot the rifle out of a good bench support, but the bag of sand is all I had available.

So here are the results from today's shooting session.

The first scan has seven rounds in it. The larger hole on the left side of the target and up a few inches from the center is the first three rounds I fired out of the gun. This was a result of holding dead center on the target at 50 yards following the bore sight. The other three holes in the target just to the left of the center are the results of tinkering with the scope a bit. The third, single hole just below and almost center of the bulls eye is a test shot after moving the scope over just a bit to get right to left lined up.


Now to the first shots at 100 yards. These are the three shots to the left at 100 yards.


The last target picture is what I was able to achieve before the rain started falling on me. These are the last three shots I fired out of the rifle.


Conclusion of performance:

I don't shoot much. Like I said, this is the first high powered rifle I have shot in 10 years. Although I would of liked to had a good sturdy bench rest to secure the rifle, I had to settle for the big bag of play sand.

When the first three shots straight out of the box without any scope adjustment filled a hole the size of a dime, I was very pleased. After tinkering with the rifle a little more, I got it into what, for me, is a pretty decent group.

The ammo used during this firing was Federal Fusion 165 grain and the scope on the rifle is a Nikon Prostaff 3x9x40. Want to find a range that allows shots out to 500 yards, but haven't found one close yet.

All in all, the Remington performed to my standards. I know the groups can be better, but it is going to take me some time to get used to shooting again.

What I would like to ask of the members who shoot on a regular basis is this. Are the groups shown on the targets decent for a rifle straight out of the box with no modifications performed? Also, what mods could I do besides practice to get the gun shooting more accurate? Any help or information would be appreciated.
 

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Thies results dont supprise me at all. Remington makes some damn nice rifles at an decent price. I'd sugest glass bedding the stock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the response. I have been looking at aftermarket stocks for the rifle. Would you suggest an aftermarket stock without the glass bedding, or both? I am also going to use this rifle to hopefully take down some whitetails and coyotes as well. And if lucky enough to be drawn for a hunt, take it out for Elk.
 

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unless your wanting a serious tack driver then i wouldent worry about it. Alot of the effects of vibrations and harmonics wont play a huge role in shots at 100 yards.

Get what i comfortable to you, IMHO aftermarket stocks are a wast if the original fits you. If your going to get a stock and want to bed it, i'd suggest doing it yourself. you want it to fit like a glove.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the information. Are those groups pretty fair for a rifle straight out of the box? I am not too up to date on all the shooting machines out there today.
 

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there about on par with what i've seen. Remington has always been above avarage.

The last target is what impresses me, that 3-shot group with a hot gun and the humidity level that must have been, very acceptable group.

I'd suggest a bipod and nice scope then i'd say your set. handloads are always fun to experiment with too.

Nice Shootin!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have a friend that has a 22-250 on his gun shelf at a pawn shop here at home. The gun looks like new and it has a nice looking 50mm Redfield target scoped strapped to it. I don't know what model the scope was, but have always heard Redfield made quality optics.

If you were me and had the Nikon, would you be willing to trade it to a Redfield if it is a good model? Like I said, I don't know the quality standards of Redfield today compared to earlier years. However, I do like the Nikon as it seems to be a good quality scope compared to other brands I have used, which were only Bushnell and Simmons. I had a Redfield years ago on a 6.5x55 Swedish Mauser, which I liked.

I have also looked at a Harris bipod, but not sure on what length to get. Think the ones I looked at were a 6" to 9" and a 9" to 13"

Also, I am glad you mentioned hand loading because that is something I would like to start doing. I talked to a guy at the range today who said he used to hand load. He told me I could get started pretty decent for 3 to 400 dollars. Told me I would spend more money trying to find out what works well then the actual loading equipment. Where is a good place to purchase loading equipment?

I would only be loading the 308 and my 22LR. Is there a list of items needed you may be able to provide? I take it you have experience in this area.

Thanks
 

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I dont handload myself but just do a google search or loading gear. i dont know much abuot all that stuff so hopfully someone else will chime in on that.

I'm also do not know anything about Redfield products. Nikon is a great proven company that puts out quality, so me personaly would stick with what i know what works. i'm not much of a fan of 22-250. I've never owned any rifle in that cal. So i dont know anything about its ballistics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks. In my job, I use a lot of Nikon cameras and they are top quality pieces of equipment also. I will just keep shooting the rifle and get more comfortable with it before I start with the modifications.

I will look at the hand loading items on google. Thanks again
 

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The cool thing about the Remington 700 is also the fact that you can really upgrade it and there are a lot of aftermarket products for it.

The Remington SPS 308 is very accuracte out of the factory, definitely a sub-moa (under 1 inch) rifle at 100 yards.

This is the beast my original rifle has become, LOL! It's great for competition but I don't see myself hunting or carrying this for days. I plan to buy another one next month and get back to basics.



Before I camoed the rifle:



At this point what is left of the original rifle is the action but it's still a Remington 700 SPS :)

Good shooting BTW! With match ammo, you would do even better. Looks like you have a great rifle!

In "tactical" precision shooting, the favorite factory action is the Remington 700 by far - for good reasons.
 

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Why would you want to put more money into a gun that is as accurate as anyone needs a gun to be? I would spend money on ammo, while you can get it without a huge tax.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for the responses guys. That is a nice looking rifle Urban Frog.
It is accurate as I really need for my applications skifast and I do buy several boxes of ammo every pay day.

I guess I would sorta like to get my groups at 100 as tight as possible and get used to the rifle at the longer ranges out to 5-600 yards the most I can because you never know what you may have to use it for if SHTF. Now if I could get it down to my 22LR groups at 40 yards, I would be greatly excited.
 

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Why would you want to put more money into a gun that is as accurate as anyone needs a gun to be? I would spend money on ammo, while you can get it without a huge tax.
You build the rifle for your game...

Custom barrel makes it even more accurate.

Muzzlebreak allows you to stay on target easily and over longer distance allows you to see the bullet "flying" through the air so you can actually make corrections extremely fast if necessary. Also allows you the see the impact as it occurs.

Nice bolt knob allows you to manipulate the bolt more smoothly and faster.

A good crisp trigger allows you to be more consistant with your accuracy.

Weight lowers the recoil as well.

Being able to have 10 rounds magazines helps with speed loading in timed conditions (even if it's a bolt action)

Etc...

If you're into competition, you DO want the rifle to be as accurate as possible. The factory rifle is not exactly "as accurate as anyone needs a gun to be" in that scenario and even though it's very accurate, you also want to squeeze as much accuracy as you can and add anything (crisp trigger, muzzlebreak, etc...) that will help you being more consistant.

Just a different game from casual shooting, hunting. Not better or worse, just different and as I said, you build the rifle for your game.
 

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I believe in general "it is the Indian not the arrow." Use you money to practice. The more practice, the better you will shoot under pressure and stress.

Then, if the rifle doesn't perform to satisfaction, consider a Timney trigger, custom ported barrel, bedded stock, etc.
 

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That's what I did :)

My rifle was build over 5 years based on practice and competition. I probably have 7000 rounds through that barrel now and 3000 in the original factory one.

A good Indian can become a better Indian with an improved arrow.
 

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dang nice rifles!

i'd love to have a rifle like that. A simple 700 in .243, .270, 30-06, or 308 will do for though.

MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMm...I love .243
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I have heard a lot of talk about refining the Remington trigger on the 700. Although I have nothing to base a comparison on, I felt like the trigger in the factory gun felt very well when I shot it. Again, that is with nothing by way of a custom trigger to compare to.
 

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The trigger is the most important part, next is the barrel crown and action. refine thoses and its all you'll ever need.
 

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I would think the 30-06

308 is probably more available though.

The 308 has replaced the 30-06 in precision oriented competitions... I rarely see someone shooting the 30-06 in matches.
 
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