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Museum Piece
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Discussion Starter #1


I have a bag like this for every straight wall cartridge I load for. The 45/70 bag is huge. (made from a wine carrying case)

The exception is the 30-30 bag. (bottle neck cartridge)

Everything you need to load a those cases several times.

There are 50 empty cases, my belt holds 55 more. It shows 300 primers, there are 500 there. The powder (IMR4895) is way more than I can load these cases over and over again. Even have some for other boomers :eek:

The red box in the lower right corner is a Lee classic loader kit. Everything you need to reload except the mallet (which is shown) is in that box. You can chuck the box for more room. The instruction sheet gives you loads and proper sizing info.

(History lesson alert) The reason they call it a classic kit is in 1873 when the US Army started to issue trap door Springfield rifles, they did not issue ammo. They issued a kit in a box, cases, primers, powder. The lead was stored on the chuck wagon (food wagon).
The main reason Custer lost was because they ran out of ammo. 211 of them still kilt 1/3 of the 2100 braves that attacked them with pistol caliber rifles.

LQQK an analog caliber. The Harbor Freight ones are fragile. I do not know if RCBS even makes them any more. I got this one at a gun show for $5.

The bag is a $3 thrift store find. It is a shoulder bag. You want a long strap.

The mold & ladle are optional. You can dump any bullet you want to in the bag, they just add weight. I can liberate wheel weights from cars and load to my hearts content. Lead melts at 650 degrees. A good camp fire gets hotter than that.
In the Patriot, Martin melts his dead son's pewter army men and shoots them at the red coats. It takes a hotter heat to melt pewter than wheel weight lead.

Sizing lube and boolit lube are the two tubes next to the kit.

The sand paper is to keep the fired cases from getting to long. With practice you can spin a cartridge face on that paper and shorten tot he right size.
Some folks use a Lee case trimmer. Im saving weight. If you are new to reloaded, buy the Lee case trimmer.

With this bag and my 1949 Winchester model 94. I can didi mao is a heart beat and survive in the woods all around here for months. :cool:
 

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reluctant sinner
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I much prefer the Lyman 310 system for pistol/rifle ammo. I have the optional full length tap in case sizer and the cast bullet sizer for almost all my calibers; plus a bullet mold.

For 12 gauge 2 3/4 I have a Lee deluxe hand loader kit. Have the Lyman sabot slug and Lee molds for OO and #4 buckshot, plus others.

I have loaded for my Ackley rifle in the field with only a ground nail to deprime the spent cases. This because the chamber is perfectly concentric.
 

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So maybe I'm missing something....

But if you have to carry primer...powder....and lead....tools, etc.

Why not just carry more loaded ammo in the first place?

Sorry, I just don't understand why you would ever want to carry the components of ammo instead of ammo itself.

I also don't understand people who stock up reloading supplies.

I don't stock reloading supplies, as soon as I can I turn all my powder, primers and bullets into loaded ammo as boxes of primers and jugs of powder don't do me any good on their own. It's the ammo that I want. The components are the means to that end.
 

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reluctant sinner
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I have at times loaded for about 100 different weapons, not always mine.

Ammo for a day you can carry, ammo for years might be a different story.

I like a certain amount of rounds at the ready. Brass is heavy, and can be used about 10 times maybe more up to 50 even 100 times (I pick my weapons for good chambers first). A light weight loading can easily pay for itself in weight. Same with a bullet mold if you recycle or salvage lead.
 

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Brass isn't that heavy.

Even basic reloading tools can easily weigh as much as hundreds of brass shells.

For my weight, I would rather carry a few pounds more ammo with nice, high velocity long range loaded bullets than tools and supplies to reload the old slug launcher.
 

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I prefer the Lyman Tong tool to the Lee tool as well. But are they still being made???

AS to which is the better way to go, is probably entirely dependent on circumstances.

Trip's method supposes a heavy rifle and HEAVY ammo, even if you don't carry a lot of brass, the amount of lead to keep a 45-70 shooting. Scrounging lead would be hard in the area I live. Only 500 primers is NOT a LONG term solution.

Aerindel can use a more modern light rifle and ammo that is not so heavy, like maybe a 357 lever gun with an assortment of 357 and 38 ammo.

My answer if I thought I would have to go on the run would be to take the light rifle and ammo, AND have a cache of tools, powder, primers, bullets plus molds and lead, in quantities large enough to last longer than I would.
 

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reluctant sinner
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I just weighed a 44 Mag case 115 grains, cast bullets out the bore 245 grains. That's like approaching 50% brass weight.

I'll get out my 310 set and put it on the scales later. And update this post I think about 2# maybe less. That would be about 125 rounds of brass. If I loaded them 10 times the weight saving would be about 20#.

They still make them in limited calibers. I bought most of mine on ebay or gunshows. There was the310shop dot com. I bought a lot of stuff from Randy while he owned it.
 

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Militant Normal
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Brass isn't that heavy.

Even basic reloading tools can easily weigh as much as hundreds of brass shells.

For my weight, I would rather carry a few pounds more ammo with nice, high velocity long range loaded bullets than tools and supplies to reload the old slug launcher.
You can cast more bullets if you can to find the lead. If you're clever, you may even recover the lead from the game you shoot.

Can't make more brass.

Primers are small and light; easy to carry by the thousands. A pound of Blue Dot can load the cast bullet .30-30 at almost 500 times.
 

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Primers are small and light; easy to carry by the thousands. A pound of Blue Dot can load the cast bullet .30-30 at almost 500 times.
Man, that must be a really light load.

Aerindel can use a more modern light rifle and ammo that is not so heavy, like maybe a 357 lever gun with an assortment of 357 and 38 ammo.
No, I don't believe in PCC's. In a country where the most popular rifle has a scope and can shoot a 2" group at 100 yards even when held by a moron I don't want to be holding a cowboy action gun when the shooting starts, or any gun with low capacity and short range.

I like my .44, and .45LC and .38's and .45-70 but they are just wallhangers for SHTF. (except for my .38 LCR, its so small its a good BUG)
 

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Museum Piece
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Discussion Starter #10
Trip's method supposes a heavy rifle and HEAVY ammo, even if you don't carry a lot of brass, the amount of lead to keep a 45-70 shooting. Scrounging lead would be hard in the area I live.
Dude, see those cases, they are 30-30, not big, in fact weenie to a lot of what I have. The 45/70 bag has 200 soft point 405s in it, and the total weight of the 45/70 bag is 15lbs. it wont be carried far.

The 30-30 is 6 lbs. About the same as the 30WCF that shoots them. The 45ACP bag and 357 bag all weight less than the 6lb 30-30 bag.

I dont know a place in the US where cars are at. 80% of all wheels still have lead wheel weights on them. A junk yard would have lots.

I can walk around my block and collect half a 5 gallon bucket.
 

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Militant Normal
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14 -15 grains of Blue Dot in the .30-30 case will push a 165 grain Ranch Dog to about 1800 fps from a 24 inch rifle barrel. You can go as high as 16.5 grains and still be within SAAMI pressure limits.
 

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old gunsel
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Compromises, it’s all about giving something up to gain something else.
A loaded 300Blk round will fit inside a 45-70 case and rattle around.
As will the 223 and cartridges based on the case. I think Grendel would too.
The velocities of the 300Blk and 45-70 are more or less the same,
but bullet weights are necessarily different. The 300 WinMag throws the
same bullets as the 300Blk, but gains a lot of velocity. Which do you want?
The argument runs toward the 30-30, but the 300Blk does the same thing.
I’d be leaning toward the more modern cartridges, the 338’s will out perform
the 45-70 while weighing in about the same, rifles cartridges, etc..
Yes the 45-70 uses less powder, but the 338 will take down every living beast
in North America, and do it at longer distances.
No one really is right or wrong here. There are arguments several ways.
What it comes down to, is what do you want to give up, or gain.
Do you want ten million 22 Short, or 100 45-70’s? (Slight exaggeration)
I think it goes back to the large & small compromise.
Large pistol cartridge, small rifle cartridge, or big game rifle, small handgun.
Or meet in the middle with a 357/357, 44Mag/44Mag pistol/rifle combo.
I wonder if a 300Blk SBR would do it all...
:zombie:whip:
 

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reluctant sinner
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Ok so I dug out the 44 Mag 310 stuff

5 piece set of 310 dies w/box, steel handle that takes the insert, tap in full length case sizer, cast bullet sizer, single cavity bullet mold with handles is 3.5 pounds. It would be about 2# with the alloy 310 handle and the bullet mold only (harder to use). Need a lead, spoon and stick plus a fire for bullet casting.

The alloy handle is much lighter - but I don't like their feel, so I use the made in 1957 only steel handles that take the insert.
 

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...Ammo for a day you can carry, ammo for years might be a different story.

I like a certain amount of rounds at the ready. Brass is heavy, and can be used about 10 times maybe more up to 50 even 100 times (I pick my weapons for good chambers first). A light weight loading can easily pay for itself in weight. Same with a bullet mold if you recycle or salvage lead.
Given a thrifty shooter, it's amazing how far an ammo supply can stretch.
 

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reluctant sinner
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That's exactly why I encourage every one to shoot now and develop your skills while its both legal and somewhat cheap plus replacement ammo is available.

I like the concept of chamber adapters, especially if rifled for bullets.
 

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Museum Piece
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Discussion Starter #16
I was just trying to show the preppers and youngins an idea for hauling a light reload bag on walk about.
All the pistol calibers and smaller rifle calibers are ideal for this.

What you use, and how you do it is all your own affair. Just trying to give folks choices.
 

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Personally on a walk-about, I'd just carry more loaded ammo. In a scenario where I'd be leaving for a "long time" or NCH... I'd only take .223, or .308 or .30-'06. Easily found pretty much anywhere. If I HAD to make a choice I'd hit the .308/7.72 in a MSR platform I guess. I'm not saying the bags have NO value at all, I think they do. However, I see them as more of a cache type of supplement.
 

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Dude, see those cases, they are 30-30, not big, in fact weenie to a lot of what I have. The 45/70 bag has 200 soft point 405s in it, and the total weight of the 45/70 bag is 15lbs. it wont be carried far.

The 30-30 is 6 lbs. About the same as the 30WCF that shoots them. The 45ACP bag and 357 bag all weight less than the 6lb 30-30 bag.

I dont know a place in the US where cars are at. 80% of all wheels still have lead wheel weights on them. A junk yard would have lots.

I can walk around my block and collect half a 5 gallon bucket.
DUDE You assume we can see a picture of what you are doing. I don't see no picture. I am going by what you wrote, and all you wrote about is a 45-70.
30-30 makes a lot more sense. Carrying several different calibers and guns AND reloading tools sounds pretty heavy to me, why not stash the reloading stuff somewhere. Have you looked at wheel weights lately, most of them are glue on pot metal.
 
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