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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,

A good portion of my preparedness revolves around understanding how things work. What do I need to build or create x, and where do I get the tools and resources to do that? How do I get from an empty field to a pizza? How do I refine petroleum? How would I recreate modern communications from scratch after an EMP? I read and study this information, and save it for later reference. Usually studying a topic leads me to more and more areas to understand, then tracing every resource back to its raw materials. But I'm running out of areas to research...

Ive scoured the internet for resources like https://www.pssurvival.com/, the gigantic https://archive.org/details/texts and the fantastic http://www.survivorlibrary.com/. Ive gone through all the "Survival Resources" sections on all the preparedness websites, and I think I have something on just about every topic covered and just about every raw material mapped. In addition to online resources, one of my favorite sources of inspiration is the outstanding book "The Knowledge: How to Rebuild Our World from Scratch" by Lewis Dartnell.

As I'm sure people will ask, I have my information (getting close to ~270GB) stored in a couple locations including a copy on a laptop, and a kindle with memory cards and a solar charger stored in a shielded case.

With the handicap that you don't know what all is in my collection, Id like to ask for input from the learned members of this forum on topics/subjects that I may not have thought of. What skills or areas of knowledge do people overlook? Id like to hear your favorite sources of checklists, cheetsheets, handbooks, reference books, maps, archives, manuals, etc.

Thanks in advance!
 

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A good portion of my preparedness revolves around understanding how things work. What do I need to build or create x, and where do I get the tools and resources to do that? How do I get from an empty field to a pizza? How do I refine petroleum? How would I recreate modern communications from scratch after an EMP? I read and study this information, and save it for later reference. Usually studying a topic leads me to more and more areas to understand, then tracing every resource back to its raw materials. But I'm running out of areas to research...

Ive scoured the internet for resources like https://www.pssurvival.com/, the gigantic https://archive.org/details/texts and the fantastic http://www.survivorlibrary.com/. Ive gone through all the "Survival Resources" sections on all the preparedness websites, and I think I have something on just about every topic covered and just about every raw material mapped. In addition to online resources, one of my favorite sources of inspiration is the outstanding book "The Knowledge: How to Rebuild Our World from Scratch" by Lewis Dartnell.

As I'm sure people will ask, I have my information (getting close to ~270GB) stored in a couple locations including a copy on a laptop, and a kindle with memory cards and a solar charger stored in a shielded case.

With the handicap that you don't know what all is in my collection, Id like to ask for input from the learned members of this forum on topics/subjects that I may not have thought of. What skills or areas of knowledge do people overlook? Id like to hear your favorite sources of checklists, cheetsheets, handbooks, reference books, maps, archives, manuals, etc.
You can search Youtube for more information. I share your passion for knowledge. Information can be empowering, inspiring and enjoyable.

But (with all respect to you) focus, boundaries, goal-setting and balance are important in life. Our lifetime is limited. And the urge to have ALL knowledge of mankind could be obsessive-compulsive in some cases. It could lead to information-overload, internet-addiction, burnout, decision-fatigue and analysis-paralysis IMO. I am NOT saying that you are in one of those categories.

Want something useful to read?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simple_living

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Information_overload
 

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Hello all,

Id like to hear your favorite sources of checklists, cheetsheets, handbooks, reference books, maps, archives, manuals, etc.

Thanks in advance!
This, hard copies of everything. Can be downloaded directly to the brain by the Mark 1 eyeball, can be split up, disseminated to other locations, individual books can be lent to individuals, and they will last two orders of magnitude longer than computerised equipment and solar panels.
 

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This, hard copies of everything. Can be downloaded directly to the brain by the Mark 1 eyeball, can be split up, disseminated to other locations, individual books can be lent to individuals, and they will last two orders of magnitude longer than computerised equipment and solar panels.
Yah.

Have hard copies available if at all possible!

Handy to grab when you just have a few minutes & would like to catch up on something or other.

Handy to have in case whatever device you would normally use to read them is broken, being used by family, out of power etc etc etc .

Multiple folk can catch up on various subjects at the same time.

Many other handy reasons to have hard copies avail if at all possible.
 

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Bad Moon Rising
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Good thread topic.

While I don’t think it’s precisely what you had in mind, I’ll throw out the following suggestion.

Operational knowledge would be as valuable as technical knowledge. Particularly when the costs of ignorance are significantly higher. US Army (or MC) Field Manuals (FMFM) are online and downloadable. Topics such as “dismounted patrolling”; “how to tactically move a convoy of vehicles”; or “how to deploy for small unit engagements” are covered in these manuals. If you ever had to train people on tactical operations these manuals would be invaluable.

Just food for thought.

Best with it.
 

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Hard copies of Marks Mechanical Engineering Handbook, the CRC Handbook and a good text on chemistry, another on physics and a third on mechanical movements would be handy. And no, I won't sell you mine....
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You can search Youtube for more information. I share your passion for knowledge. Information can be empowering, inspiring and enjoyable.

But (with all respect to you) focus, boundaries, goal-setting and balance are important in life. Our lifetime is limited. And the urge to have ALL knowledge of mankind could be obsessive-compulsive in some cases. It could lead to information-overload, internet-addiction, burnout, decision-fatigue and analysis-paralysis IMO. I am NOT saying that you are in one of those categories.

Want something useful to read?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simple_living

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Information_overload
I know its information overload... but its how I relax =)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Good thread topic.

While I don’t think it’s precisely what you had in mind, I’ll throw out the following suggestion.

Operational knowledge would be as valuable as technical knowledge. Particularly when the costs of ignorance are significantly higher. US Army (or MC) Field Manuals (FMFM) are online and downloadable. Topics such as “dismounted patrolling”; “how to tactically move a convoy of vehicles”; or “how to deploy for small unit engagements” are covered in these manuals. If you ever had to train people on tactical operations these manuals would be invaluable.

Just food for thought.

Best with it.
Completely agree, I dont just collect this stuff, I read and study it too. Ive taken training, to the point of becoming a trainer, in several of the most applicable areas.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
This, hard copies of everything. Can be downloaded directly to the brain by the Mark 1 eyeball, can be split up, disseminated to other locations, individual books can be lent to individuals, and they will last two orders of magnitude longer than computerised equipment and solar panels.
Hard copies of the most important books definitely... Printing it all however at this point would be something in the neighborhood of 900,000 pages =)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hard copies of Marks Mechanical Engineering Handbook, the CRC Handbook and a good text on chemistry, another on physics and a third on mechanical movements would be handy. And no, I won't sell you mine....
Were on the same page, Ive got a nice textbook library, and I do have a copy of marks. =) Ive got a CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, is that the one or is there another I should be looking out for?
 

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Reading the theory behind X is not like actually doing it. You can read for decades on basketball but that doesn’t make you even have the ability to even dribble the ball. How about shooting, gutting, skinning, and butchering a deer? Reading and doing are different. How about you try to put your knowledge to use, maybe try each think you learned at least once.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Reading the theory behind X is not like actually doing it. You can read for decades on basketball but that doesn’t make you even have the ability to even dribble the ball. How about shooting, gutting, skinning, and butchering a deer? Reading and doing are different. How about you try to put your knowledge to use, maybe try each think you learned at least once.
Yup... Reading and doing are different. I do alot... and read even more. Did you have a specific resource to suggest... or just here to tell me how wrong my approach is? Id love to hear your favorite underrated skill that I should add to my list?
 

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Yup... Reading and doing are different. I do alot... and read even more. Did you have a specific resource to suggest... or just here to tell me how wrong my approach is? Id love to hear your favorite underrated skill that I should add to my list?
A friend invited us over to do some tanning. Scheduling doesn’t mesh, so we’re going to have to put that offf towards another season.

...so anyways my point is, practical resources abound...if you you connect with them...
 

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A friend invited us over to do some tanning. Scheduling doesn’t mesh, so we’re going to have to put that offf towards another season.

...so anyways my point is, practical resources abound...if you you connect with them...
Now that would be cool... I love to learn from someone that knows their stuff, watch over a tanning expert's shoulder...
 

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I know its information overload... but its how I relax =)
Information-addiction can give the same frenzy as any other mental addiction, like gambling-addiction, sex-addiction and work-addiction. One can ask oneself: "Do I still control this behavior, or does this behavior control me?"

If one gets out of balance into information-addiction, it may pose a serious risk to ones emotional well-being and medical and financial health. Information-hoarding can for example lead to choice-paralysis and depression.

Solutions for information-addiction:

http://davincidilemma.com/2017/09/information-addiction-the-costs/

http://neladunato.com/blog/how-to-overcome-information-addiction/

http://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/counsellor-articles/addiction-a-search-for-transformation
 

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Hello all,

A good portion of my preparedness revolves around understanding how things work. What do I need to build or create x, and where do I get the tools and resources to do that? How do I get from an empty field to a pizza? How do I refine petroleum? How would I recreate modern communications from scratch after an EMP? I read and study this information, and save it for later reference. Usually studying a topic leads me to more and more areas to understand, then tracing every resource back to its raw materials. But I'm running out of areas to research...

Ive scoured the internet for resources like https://www.pssurvival.com/, the gigantic https://archive.org/details/texts and the fantastic http://www.survivorlibrary.com/. Ive gone through all the "Survival Resources" sections on all the preparedness websites, and I think I have something on just about every topic covered and just about every raw material mapped. In addition to online resources, one of my favorite sources of inspiration is the outstanding book "The Knowledge: How to Rebuild Our World from Scratch" by Lewis Dartnell.

As I'm sure people will ask, I have my information (getting close to ~270GB) stored in a couple locations including a copy on a laptop, and a kindle with memory cards and a solar charger stored in a shielded case.

With the handicap that you don't know what all is in my collection, Id like to ask for input from the learned members of this forum on topics/subjects that I may not have thought of. What skills or areas of knowledge do people overlook? Id like to hear your favorite sources of checklists, cheetsheets, handbooks, reference books, maps, archives, manuals, etc.

Thanks in advance!
I think the best course of action is not prep for a particular event but be prepared generally by being as self sufficient and self reliant as you can.

that will provide insulation from all events as well as providing you with the nessesary skills for surviving when modern systems are no longer available
 

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When thing you might think about doing is downloading Wikipedia. You can use a program called Kiwix for it.
 
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