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I'm looking at headlamps (Petzl, to be specific). Some have an added colored lens, some don't. I've searched here to learn about colored lens filters on flashlights or headlamps, etc. Havent located this info yet....what are colored lens filters for?
red is for....
green is for.....
blue is for.....
Please give any advice, either on a good headlamp and/or on colored lenses that are good to have.

thank you, db
 

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Red is traditional for preserving night vision but the most recent research shows that green is actually better for that. This info comes from astronomers, who themselves are having difficulty switching from red to green due to years of belief that red is better for preserving night vision. I sure don't know.

Green is for reading road maps that have red markings on them which would otherwise disappear if you used a red lamp. Hunters also use it for tracking blood trails at night.

I don't know what blue is for but I think it works nicely as low level light that doesn't attract as much attention as red or green. From a distance, blue looks like it could be a reflection off of water or something metallic, whereas red either looks like a fire or an artificial light. Green light is just not natural and would likely get attention too.
 

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ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒ&
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I don't know what blue is for but I think it works nicely as low level light that doesn't attract as much attention as red or green. From a distance, blue looks like it could be a reflection off of water or something metallic, whereas red either looks like a fire or an artificial light. Green light is just not natural and would likely get attention too.
A blue lens will allow you to identify blood from dirt at night w/o overly exposing yourself.

The red light is used at night because it is much dimmer than the other colors, does not penetrate deep into the darkness and will not draw attention like other color spectrums will. For example-while night hunting, if you illuminate an area with a red spectrum lense, it will not disturb the wildlife. If use illuminated the same area with a white, blue or green light, the critters will become alert and likely scram in a few seconds.

However, is someone is monitoring an area with NVG, it doesn't matter what color you use--all bets are off--you'll be seen.
 

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The guy in the shop told me blue light is supposed to be better in fog. That is why some fog lamps are blue. Me, I have never noticed a difference.

Red light also has the slowest effect on the stuff in your eyes so you lose your night vision more slowly when using a red lamp.
 

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One thing that I have noticed about the blue is that Non-Natural Shapes and colors are enhanced by the blue light. Reflective surfaces such as licens plates get as bright as the moon when the blue ligh hits em.

This is all in my eperiences. It seems to make straight lines stand out better. No straight or perfect shapes in nature.

I dont like the Red. I know people say the whole night ision thing. Te be honest it may just be me. My eyes are very sensitive to light, for better or worse, I have to wear sunglasses out doors on overcast days. My natural night vision is more effective than the red light. Trust me I am not bragging about it. It kinda sucks in alot of ways. I look like a fly on an overcast day wearing sunglasses. I have gotten two tickets for driving at dusk with no headlights on. I have to be careful.
 
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