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Navigator of the Unknown
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A couple years ago I picked up a 1967 Colt Firearms Mfg. Co. Woodsmaster recurve bow, 58" long and with a draw weight of 51#@ 28", that looked like it had never been shot. It didn't come with a string, however, which I now see should have been a red flag, because when I finally got around to getting a string for it, I discovered a twist in the lower limb. This was almost certainly caused by the bow's having been stored in an upright position for several years.

My first thought was to try and sell the bow and cut my losses, but in the end I decided to try to fix the twisted limb. It turned out to be super easy. I used the method I found on another discussion board: soak a large towel (like a beach towel), wring out the excess water and place folded on a cookie sheet. Heat it up in the oven at about 300 degrees, periodically adjusting the towel so that it heats up evenly. Once the towel is too hot to touch with your bare hands, use gloves to take it out of the oven and wrap around the twisted limb. After 3 to 5 minutes, remove the towel and "bump" the twisted limb back into position.

You can repeat the procedure if necessary, but I was able to completely rehabilitate this bow on the very first try. Its turned out to be a snappy shooter too, and might be my go to bow at deer season, if I can ever get used to the non-radiused arrow shelf.
 

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Rebel Scum
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Do you think that would work on a composite limb. I have a pse kingfisher recurve that has a small twist on the bottom limb
 

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As far as I know you can permanently bend wood into a particular position by using dry heat or steam. Sounds like you used steam heat in this case.

The heat opens up the wood fibers and allows them to re-form into a different position once they cool back down. Steam or wet heat is often preferred so as not to burn or dry out the wood and weaken it.
 

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what pirate's?
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A couple years ago I picked up a 1967 Colt Firearms Mfg. Co. Woodsmaster recurve bow, 58" long and with a draw weight of 51#@ 28", that looked like it had never been shot. It didn't come with a string, however, which I now see should have been a red flag, because when I finally got around to getting a string for it, I discovered a twist in the lower limb. This was almost certainly caused by the bow's having been stored in an upright position for several years.

My first thought was to try and sell the bow and cut my losses, but in the end I decided to try to fix the twisted limb. It turned out to be super easy. I used the method I found on another discussion board: soak a large towel (like a beach towel), wring out the excess water and place folded on a cookie sheet. Heat it up in the oven at about 300 degrees, periodically adjusting the towel so that it heats up evenly. Once the towel is too hot to touch with your bare hands, use gloves to take it out of the oven and wrap around the twisted limb. After 3 to 5 minutes, remove the towel and "bump" the twisted limb back into position.

You can repeat the procedure if necessary, but I was able to completely rehabilitate this bow on the very first try. Its turned out to be a snappy shooter too, and might be my go to bow at deer season, if I can ever get used to the non-radiused arrow shelf.
Two easy ways to fix the non-radioused shelf.

1. Bear weather rest.
2. Match stick under the shelf material.
 

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Navigator of the Unknown
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97 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Two easy ways to fix the non-radioused shelf.

1. Bear weather rest.
2. Match stick under the shelf material.
I've thought of the Bear weather rest, but having used it on other bows, I have found it works best with lighter weight carbon shafts. I've been shooting Easton Legacy 2020 shafts or cedar arrows with this bow, both of which are very heavy. The match stick idea is brilliant.
 

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Navigator of the Unknown
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Would have been nice to see before and after pictures; overall this is good info to have.
Too late for "before" pics, but here are some "after" ones:





(see how perfectly the string now sits in the groove!)







 

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Navigator of the Unknown
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So i tried it today on my composit. Either i did i wrong or it don't work on compisit limbs :(
I guess it depends on what materials make up the "composite". You would probably have a problem if the twisted limb is made out some kind of phenolic or micarta, or something like that.
 
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