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I seem to recall having read somewhere that I should not use rechargeable batteries in my LED Maglites (AA and D Cell models). However, I cannot find such a warning in the instruction manual or on the website.

Is it okay to use rechargeables or not?

Thanks for any information.
 

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I seem to recall having read somewhere that I should not use rechargeable batteries in my LED Maglites (AA and D Cell models). However, I cannot find such a warning in the instruction manual or on the website.

Is it okay to use rechargeables or not?

Thanks for any information.
I use rechargeables in my mags. I don't know anything about it being bad for them. They seem to work fine.

Anybody else?
 

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more than you asked

Not a problem for a LED flashlight. Keep the following in mind, alkaline batteries are generally thought of as 1.5 volt cells since they replaced the old zinc carbon battery which really were 1.5 volt batteries. FYI, alkaline batteries usually test at over 1.6 volts out of the package (no load). NiCad or NiMh battery voltage may measure between 1.35-1.4 volts when fully charged depending on how long after charging you wait to test the battery. When you use a rechargeable NiCad or NiMh battery as a replacement for an alkaline battery, you are starting with a cell that is producing a slightly lower voltage. In a flashlight the light output may appear somewhat dimmer, probably not noticeable without an instrument. If you have a more sophisticated item, like a short-wave radio for example there may be a difference. Still, a lower voltage battery cant hurt your radio, just may not give the battery life you have come to expect from an alkaline battery. A freshly charged set of rechargeable batteries measuring say 1.3 volts shows up in my SW radio as a not so fresh battery because the built in battery meter ( a bar graph) thinks it is looking at an alkaline battery. My SW radio works just fine, just the meter is showing the lower voltage. However, I have heard of radios that automatically shut down at a preset voltage because they use some battery power to save the preset memories, your radio could shut down earlier on the rechargeable. Note, Lithium batteries are not the same chemistry, typically have a much higher output voltage, like 3 volts, don't try to adapt them unless you have considered the consequences. If you have one of the super powerful flashlights, more like a light saber, like my Cree, typically advertised as 1to 5 watts output, they will have a CR123 battery, those are not alkaline batteries, you should use caution selecting a rechargeable replacement as I hear the 3.6 volts produced by some batteries can fry your flashlight. If this rings a bell with you, then google "CR123 or RCR123 and protected". By the way, more batteryology. When you shopping for a rechargeable battery be aware of the following. Small rechargeable batteries capacity is rated in milli-amp hours, a good supplier will list this number on the side of the battery. This is no different that the amp hour rating for your car battery, another story. Today a good NiMh rechargeable AA cell battery will be rated a 2400-2500 mAh I have noticed that Harbor Freight is selling AA cells with half that rating, a good price for sure, but not the best capacity. Another scam is used to sell low capacity rechargeable D-cells. If you were in the store you could heft a high capacity battery and compare them to the cheap low capacity batteries and know the difference by weight. Eveready used to market a C-cell battery inside a D-cell package and sold them slightly cheaper that the high capacity batteries, a real sheep in wolfs clothing. At several survival sites I see kits of adapters, essentially a set of plastic tubes to allow a AAA and AA battery to be placed in a D-cell application. Believe me you wont get much performance there, however, I must admit in a pinch it might be better than nothing, just know what you are doing and do it. Just don't get the idea you can stock up on AAA batteries and use the sleeves to get out of stocking any D-cells. I had better stop before I put everyone to sleep. Hope this helps. That is more than you ask, but there it is.
 
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