Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,282 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a pistol that i bought from a neighbor. It probably has 2,000 rounds put through it. It is still tight and fires well, but I know it will wear out sooner later. Given the difficulty of buying a new one (and it aint gonna get easier) what parts should I buy now to rebuild it in the future? Does my thinking make sense? Sure, it might be cheaper to buy a new pistol, but that may not be an option.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,127 Posts
Springs wear out. Firing pins, magazines (assuming a semi auto). Some parts are prone to breakage, but they would be firearm specific.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,453 Posts
springs, and they are not particularly expensive. only spring I've ever seen actually break is a trigger spring, but I don't have a ton of experience.

don't take it apart if you don't have to - springs and detents are commonly lost as they shoot accross a room to never never land during assembly dissasembly.
 

·
Be careful out there
Joined
·
147 Posts
Get a Wolff Gunsprings service pack to start. After you order that tell us the name of your new Roscoe. That will go a long way in determining what spare parts to keep on hand.
 

·
Ordinary Average Guy
Joined
·
1,062 Posts
I bought a springs service pack once. When it arrived, I realized I was in way over my head. One of these days I will take the pistol and spring pack to a smith and get it done.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
147 Posts
Unless you have more or less than two thumbs and an 80 IQ, you should be able to do it. It may require an investment in punches and a block. Youtube is helpful for doing many jobs. Out side of springs, you might need extractor, firing pin and magazines. Not much goes wrong unless woefully abused or neglected. Make and model would be helpful.
 

·
What hell, pay attention
Joined
·
8,146 Posts
First and foremost, if thats the gun you plan on using for anything serious, then you want to buy at least one spare just like it, right off, and a bunch of spare mags, speedloaders, etc. A spare keeps you in business, without skipping a beat, no matter what.

Unless youre buying something known for parts failure at an early age, I wouldnt worry too much about buying a bunch of spare parts. RSA/ recoil springs if anything.

If youre not shooting it much, with a gun of reasonable quality, you really have little to worry about. I have a number of guns that have quite a few rounds through them, that Ive been shooting regularly for three or four decades, and except for recoil springs, all are still running on their original parts.

I think the only thing you may need to watch is when buying used guns that whoever had it before you didnt try to "improve" it. Ive had a couple of those that were trouble, even dangerous, and I had to return them to factory specs to get things straightened out. Once I did that, they've been fine ever since.

Ive been shooting all sorts of things on a regular basis for about 50 years now. The only guns that Ive had any breakages with, were high round count (both live ammo and dry fire) guns, and those failures were usually in the upper tens of thousands of rounds and bazillions of dry fires.

The three guns that come to mind there are, a Springfield M1A that broke a GI firing pin after years of constant use. An HK MP5 broke a roller retainer clip in the bolt after years of high volume auto fire. And most recently, a Glock 17 thats my main practice gun, that Im still shooting on a weekly basis, and have been since 2009. The first thing to go on it, was a trigger return spring, at around 90K.

I think something thats often missed here is, if youre shooting them enough to be breaking things, youve probably spent enough in ammo to have bought a number of new guns over the same time. I did that math on my Glock above, and just using my reload cost price, I could have bought something like 37 new guns for what I spent in components.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,109 Posts
Lot's of mental maturation here and mall ninja pontificating, but I still don't know whether we are talking about a bottom feeder, wheelgun or a wheel lock.....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,282 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I have the G 23 Ditto on buying a twin, but that is a little hard to do now.
 

·
Be careful out there
Joined
·
147 Posts
I have the G 23 Ditto on buying a twin, but that is a little hard to do now.
Glocks are one of the easiest handguns to work on. Get some Standard Capacity mags for it unless you live in a restricted state-then get 10 rounders. Get a repair kit- Lone Wolf, Glockmeister, etc. carry them. One for frame, one for slide. Since it’s a 40, get a couple more recoil spring assemblies. A new firing pin would be nice.

Only tools needed will be a punch. Learn how to do a complete strip-down. There’s lots of YouTube vids on how to do this. If this is your SHTF gun you should be very familiar with its functioning and repair. If, God forbid, the fecal material does hit the oscillating device, YOU will be the gunsmith. You’ll either have a functioning weapon or a one use club.

Only other thing you’ll need is ammo. Good luck 🙂
 

·
What hell, pay attention
Joined
·
8,146 Posts
These days, I believe Glock is recommending an RSA change every 5000 rounds. If you dont know for sure what the approximate round count is on the gun, Id just swap it out. They are cheap enough. In the couple of Glocks I have that I shoot a lot, I usually just change them every six months or so. If I buy a used Glock that looks like its been shot a bit (the barrel "smiley" is usually a good indicator), I just swap that right out.

I understand this isnt the best time to buy right now, and personally, Id wait until things tone down a bit. But I would make ammo and mags, and that my first priority when you can do it.

Early on, I used to have basic spare parts for every gun, but over the years, I changed my mind and went the other direction. I have a few basic things for certain types of guns, but other than that, I dont really bother.

For my Glocks, I have spare RSA's, as they are a basic wear item, and a couple of spare trigger return springs, since, from past experience, that seems to be something that "might" go down the road. Depending on the Gen., an RSA $8-$18, and trigger spring will set you back $3.

Mag springs seem to last a good long time. Im still shooting a bunch of Korean Glock mags every week in practice that Ive been using for over 10 years now, and they are still on their original springs. I would think the factory Glock mags would hold up as well. I have some 40-50 year old 1911 mags that have never had the springs changed in them, and who knows how many rounds they have through them. I used them in practice for years, and still do use them now.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Coalcracker

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I have a pistol that i bought from a neighbor. It probably has 2,000 rounds put through it. It is still tight and fires well, but I know it will wear out sooner later.
You did not state the brand name of the pistol. Firearms are built to last, especially top brand names I have a Tanfoglio IPSC pistol. round count by now should be +70 - 80 000 (I replace the trigger assy at about 25 000, but i think it was a dud as my friend reached 50 000. Only replace recoil springs and shock buffers. Many IPSC shooters get past 100 000 on original frame, barrel, slide etc. If you care four your FA and shoot occasionally I dont think you youll reach that round count and your son will still shoot it someday
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top