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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know we are all trying prep and be ready. We all have guns and go to the range because we either enjoy it or want to keep in practice. But how well are you really prepared for when the SHTF in a real life if you get in a firefight.

The range is not the real world and in a real SHTF situation you can't say hang on one sec let me put in my earplugs. Or hang on let me get my gun from trunk of the car.

If you have not had your ears ringing from the first gunshot to the last then you may not understand what I am talking about. And you will not understand that loose reaction time the first time this happens because it does disorientate people who have not experienced it and they may not even really now where shots are coming from depending on how close of far the shooter is.

How fast can you really react?

How fast can a family member react to save your life?

Could you or family member really pull the trigger and could decide this in the drop of a dime?

There is a lot psychology when it comes to really shooting someone that must be decided in seconds and I'm kind of surprised no-one has brought it up.

You can have rooms full of shiny AR's or AK's, but they will not do you any good if you have not had some real world practice in some form.

Just a thought to the wise.

Wes
 

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Realistic training is key, it is rare that someone just "rises to the occasion".

Move, shoot, communicate those are the skills you have to hone in order to survive a gunfight.

The psychological preparation is one thing that is often overlooked by the majority of people, unless you trained hard with the understanding that the skills you are building exist to defend yourself and take a life in the process it is all just punching holes in paper.
 

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Training is key! I don't condone putting yourself between police and a bad guy just so you can have "real world experience", but training with firearms, not just bench shooting, but as Doc mentioned, moving, reloading, finding and taking cover while on the run, and jumping into different shooting positions instantaneously are all good practise.
Why? ......I can tell you from personal experience in other scenarios where your training kicks in and takes charge. A trip I was on while in the Coast Guard, we collided with another vessel at 0430 and instantly everyone went right to drill positions, no questions asked. Only a few on our ship had ever been in a real world situation like that, but previous training kicked in, it was really a thing of beauty, everything considered.
Is that the same as someone shooting back at you? NO. But it proved to me that training works!
Do your best to prepare. When it's your time to go, it's your time to go. Just try to score as many points as you can before you go.;)
 

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Thankfully, I have never been shot at in a combat situation. In fact, of the three times that I have had shots incoming in my general direction, it was obvious that I was not the target. But that was not the first thing that occurred to me on any of those occasions.

I used to do a lot of work in Hartford's violent and gang-ridden North End. It's not as bad as it used to be, but there is still a lot of ignorant violence. I used to own 17 rental unit there. On the most memorable occasion, I was replacing a front door when one of the residents of the building I was working on was targeted for a drive-by. Thankfully, ghetto marksmanship is quite wanting. I was not armed.

This is going to sound ridiculous, but my very first instinct, and one that I am grateful that I quelled, was anger, and I wanted to run after the car and viciously beat the driver and all of the occupants. Of course, this was not at all feasible, or even possible, but was my first instinct and one that demonstrated quite clearly that doing what you know to do beats doing the first thing that comes to mind when the adrenaline is flowing and emotions running high.

I had never imagined that the first emotion would have been anger. The obvious conclusion would have been fear. But I guess you can't know until it happens. That day, I learned that I need to prepare better mentally for those situations, and not risk being paralyzed by indecision, or, worse yet, end up following my first instinct.
 

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Training is the only thing that might possibly overcome the adrenaline dump your going to experience!
 

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There is nothing more stimulating than being shot at and missed.

Sorry, misquote...

"There is nothing more exhilarating than to be shot at without result."
Winston Churchill
 

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On the flip side of the coin, how many bad guys are going to hang around once the lead starts flying?

Much like surveillance video on Youtube, I suspect that they start running the other way once they encounter resistance. Even small groups are likely to break contact at first opportunity. There are easier targets to find.
 

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There is nothing more stimulating than being shot at and missed.

Stimulating is not the word I would have chosen, I do not like that sickening feeling that I get everytime I have been shot at. I also know that training is the only reason I am alive.
 

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Stimulating is not the word I would have chosen, I do not like that sickening feeling that I get everytime I have been shot at. I also know that training is the only reason I am alive.
I second the training statement. But I'm kind of a mix of the anger reaction, and thinking "If I get hit, how bad will it hurt?"

Its amazing what goes through your mind during those times. :xeye:
 

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There is no training for the psycology - as nothing is the same as someone trying to kill you. Noise acclimation and the rest are fine, but there are some things that it takes real experience for - and not everyone even reacts the same way each time.

Training is important, however, for muscle memory, as muscle memory will be what is in control.
 

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I second the training statement. But I'm kind of a mix of the anger reaction, and thinking "If I get hit, how bad will it hurt?"

Its amazing what goes through your mind during those times. :xeye:
Getting shot did not hurt as bad as I expected it too, it was more numbing than anything else nerves were instantly severed so the pain was instantaneous and then gone which was scary, one minute standing next on the ground bleeding out, but it was a life changing event and ended my military career. Surgeries and recovery were much worse psychologically.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Few people have hit on the nose with training, it rewires your brain into reacting to a pattern and if you involve speed in the training get it to a be time it will help with the reacting faster.

Training is a big part and some times you don't even know you are getting trained. When I was like six my dad noticed I was interested in six shooters so he purchased me two cap guns with a plastic holsters and anything western I wanted. He never complained about me shooting the cap guns even though it had to of cost him a few bills in caps alone. He always told me if anyone ever points a gun at you shoot them.

I wore down those six shooter to pot mental underneath fake chrome plate after three years. Not very much later my dad ended up getting two six shot 22 single actions revolvers and real holsters and told me to practice with them until my hands became used to the triggers. it took me about three months to get fast groupings in the area of a orange.

My father died two years after he gave me those two guns and I became extremely fast with them from practicing with the cap guns and ruggers.

At age 16, I was heading out to go plinking out in the hills with my cousins, so I grabbed a S&W 22 double action revolver my cousin gave me and a box of ammo stuck them in my pockets rushing to feed the dogs in the front yard before my cousin gets there. Ran outside started pouring the dog food and heard people yelling my dogs running and all I remember is a guy turning towards me in front of my fence holding a gun. Don't even remember grabbing my revolver out my pocket even shooting the guy. Only thing I was thinking was if anyone points a gun at you shoot them, it was like everything was going really slow. Then real life kicked in started hearing cries and could see the guy rolling around on the ground with neighbors surrounding him yelling that they have his gun.

Didn't even realize I was still holding the dog food bag that had all spilled out by now and my gun still in my other hand realizing there were sirens getting close. I opened the gun and sat it porch with empty dog food bag thinking **** I am going to jail killing someone.

I think the sheriffs that came out felt really bad for me after thinking about it seeing me there pale white faced holding my dogs while got my gun from the porch and having over a dozen screaming neighbors claiming why it took them so long to get there after they called 911 about a guy walking down the middle their street waving a gun around at everyone.

The offices told me that they were not going take me in for anything since it was way to clear it was self defense with the amount of witnesses and 911 phone calls. They just wanted a statement which I gave them and I thought they all felt really bad about not showing up sooner by the looks on there faces when told them what happened.

They advised me that I would not get my gun back though since it was used in a shooting and that I should really not really own a pistol until 21 by law. One officer gave me a pat on the back and told me good job you should not feel bad about shooting him. Kind of just came out since I was little ****ed off about gun blurted out I am not, just about you guys for taking my gun which point my cousin jumped in and told them that he should get me inside, him figuring this might not end well.

One the neighbors told me the tweeker with gun was just wounded by me during the incident reports had it that the bullet bunched off his leg and lodged in other soft tissue and he still had the bullet in when he went to court and took a plea. The gun he had was loaded and did help his case when they also found meth on his person during his search.

Would have he shot me, I do not know, but from something my dad told me over and over again and practice with a pair of cap guns and rugers the guy did not even have a chance.

People are not given a choice when it comes to using deadly force to survive, The choice is yours and yours alone live or die in a matter of seconds.

Wes
 

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Getting shot did not hurt as bad as I expected it too, it was more numbing than anything else nerves were instantly severed so the pain was instantaneous and then gone which was scary, one minute standing next on the ground bleeding out, but it was a life changing event and ended my military career. Surgeries and recovery were much worse psychologically.
I can see that. Couple it with the adrenalin rush, and I can see where the pain would be numbed.

Not as bad as getting shot but....years ago I made a DUI stop on what turned out to be an illegal Haitian who didn't want to be deported. I had him out of the car and questioning him when he decided to run. After about a 5 minute foot chase, he tried to go inside a house to.....hell, I don't know what he was thinking with that move. Anyway, I caught him high and rotated him backwards and down and rode him to the ground at the same time. Everybody else piled up on him and he went in cuffs.

A few minutes later I was talking to the Sgt and doing the initial use of force reporting to him and my wrist started tingling. I said "Sarge....this don't feel right" and picked my arm up so we could both look. Turns out, I had broken my wrist when the perp and I hit the ground because my arm was around him. So basically all of my weight and the perps weight were on my wrist when we landed. Off to the ER I went.

I didn't feel any real pain for almost an hour. Like I said, not exactly being shot. But I can totally understand the adrenalin masking the pain.
 

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There is nothing more stimulating than being shot at and missed.

Sorry, misquote...

"There is nothing more exhilarating than to be shot at without result."
Winston Churchill
There is no hunting like the hunting of man, and those who have hunted armed men long enough and liked it, never care for anything else thereafter.
Ernest Hemmingway :thumb:
 

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I can see that. <snip>
"friendly fire", Iraqi Police shot me, so it was total suprise, close range. 5 rounds 7.62x39, plates saved my life but almost lost my arm. I know it wasn't on purpose the guy dropped his weapon and was crying.

It was ruled accident, due to poor trigger finger discipline and lack of discipline in general. firefights I came out with only minor scratches on 2 deployments, this was supposed to be "safe" going on patrols in "secured" areas.
 
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I remember when I was younger, the feeling I took part in my first round of paintball. The feeling I had then is similar to what I imagine it would be like getting shot at now. Of course, the repercussions of getting shot by a real gun would be much more severe, but to my young mind, it sure felt like there wasn't much difference. The fear of getting shot can either be helpful or harmful depending on how you let it effect you. In my case, trying to get skinny behind a pine tree wasn't as effective as returning fire would have been, and I got grazed multiple times. If I had let that happen in a real gun fight, I would have been screwed.
 
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