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The Fuzz
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212 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Be gentle, it’s a work in progress.

The 100 acre property is located 90 miles from my primary residence (1.5 hour drive under normal conditions). 80 miles from nearest “large city”. Property access is limited to a small dirt road 3 miles off closest paved surface. 2 ponds, 3 drilled wells and several large year around streams/springs. Mostly wooded, numerous rock bluffs and caves.



The cabin was built using 6x6 walnut beams. The bottom layer is bolted to the cement slab and the following layers are bolted to the layers below (8" lag bolts). It's plumbed for a running water using an electric pump connected to the nearby stream, (currently using an outhouse but plan to add a regular toilet in the future). The small wood stove more than enough to heat the entire structure. Electricity is provided by a portable gas generator.




I'm still working on the cabin interior as I get time and money. I closed in 2 bedrooms downstairs plus a loft area above. The main downstairs area will serve as a living room and kitchen combo.





10’ x 12’ underground storage. Filled cement block walls. 10” poured concrete slab ceiling. 10" cement slab floor. Built into heavily wooded hillside about 200 yards from the cabin. Can be accessed on foot or ATV. I know - The wooden door is subpar - I plan on having a steel door built when funds allow. Vent holes for air filtration – again, when funds allow I will add an NBC filter.




Largest cave: large room (6’ tall x 10’wide x 30’ deep) and narrow passages leading over ½ mile underground. Has a natural spring that flows through the main passage and exits at the mouth of the main room.


 

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reluctant sinner
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17,913 Posts
Looks great to me!!!

I like straight up runs for would stove pipe, less clogs (burn a few Zink pennies) and easier to clean and inspect. The roof jack causes less problems near the peak than towards the eve.

A propane generator would be my choice. Would be nice to capture the heat from the exhaust and engine. Plus there are propane lights, freezers and refrigerators, stove and cook tops, and water heaters. 1000 gallon buried tank. I think the iron nickel battery bank would be a good investment and perhaps some solar panels and a wind generator.

Can you start adding nut or fruit trees?
 

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The Fuzz
Joined
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212 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Looks great to me!!!

A propane generator would be my choice. Would be nice to capture the heat from the exhaust and engine. Plus there are propane lights, freezers and refrigerators, stove and cook tops, and water heaters. 1000 gallon buried tank. I think the iron nickel battery bank would be a good investment and perhaps some solar panels and a wind generator.

Can you start adding nut or fruit trees?
True, I would love to add to the power supply someday with solar or wind. I'm a little scared that the remote property might beg vandals to destroy/shoot out a solar panel (same reason I don't have any windows on the main floor). It sits in the middle of wooded private property, but we still get a few hunters walking the creeks from time to time.

We have a few apple, peach, pear and walnut trees already, but more wouldn't hurt.
 

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Heading for my BOL
Joined
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279 Posts
The first image made me thought that you have made an excellent choice and after seen all I can say you did.
Water, essential, fundamental and basic for any survival situation.

I would go for a full cement structure but that OK. You can fortify it as you go. For security I would suggest to get a nice far reaching bolt gun and establish some checkpoints that can overlook the only road that leads to your place.

For energy I'd say don't bother with wind. To much service as it has a lot of moving parts that friction wears out. Go for solar and try to invest at a good battery/capacitor system to store electricity. Lots of info in the internet.

As you are in the process, one last tought/tip: You can make your sewage tank to provide natural gas for your heating/cooking/energy needs. It will yield the best if you only throw in toilet waste and not other chemicals such as cleaners, detergents etc.
 

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It's Survival Of
Joined
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1,977 Posts
Very nice! I'd love to see more pictures and get more details...

How many are going to join you at the BOL? Do you have plans to build more cabins, maybe get a basic garden going and put out some incentive for large game to forage near by?

Can we get some pictures of inside the big cave? Have you ventured the tunnels at all?

You've peaked my interest for sure, I love pic heavy BOL threads!
 

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_llll
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2,734 Posts
Very nice. But I had to choke when I read you built it from walnut. Here you can sell straight walnut trees to amish for a few thousand. But really nice place.
 

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Banned
Joined
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110 Posts
That looks amazing. I can't think of anything really aside from the wooden door you mentioned and a garden somewhere nearby. Given the humidity how do you think mushrooms would do in that cave?
 

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Registered
Joined
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5,306 Posts
In my opinion, you should adopt a 54 year old used up old welder and let him and his immediate family occupy a small cabin on that property. It's just a thought. Mull it over for a while and get back to me.

You have a very nice place and are well on your way to being a survivor. You are miles ahead of probably 99% of the population now.
 

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Silent Bob
Joined
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2,343 Posts
Be gentle, it’s a work in progress.

The 100 acre property is located 90 miles from my primary residence (1.5 hour drive under normal conditions). 80 miles from nearest “large city”. Property access is limited to a small dirt road 3 miles off closest paved surface. 2 ponds, 3 drilled wells and several large year around streams/springs. Mostly wooded, numerous rock bluffs and caves.



The cabin was built using 6x6 walnut beams. The bottom layer is bolted to the cement slab and the following layers are bolted to the layers below (8" lag bolts). It's plumbed for a running water using an electric pump connected to the nearby stream, (currently using an outhouse but plan to add a regular toilet in the future). The small wood stove more than enough to heat the entire structure. Electricity is provided by a portable gas generator.




I'm still working on the cabin interior as I get time and money. I closed in 2 bedrooms downstairs plus a loft area above. The main downstairs area will serve as a living room and kitchen combo.





10’ x 12’ underground storage. Filled cement block walls. 10” poured concrete slab ceiling. 10" cement slab floor. Built into heavily wooded hillside about 200 yards from the cabin. Can be accessed on foot or ATV. I know - The wooden door is subpar - I plan on having a steel door built when funds allow. Vent holes for air filtration – again, when funds allow I will add an NBC filter.




Largest cave: large room (6’ tall x 10’wide x 30’ deep) and narrow passages leading over ½ mile underground. Has a natural spring that flows through the main passage and exits at the mouth of the main room.


You know Porn isnt allowed on this site :)
 

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Anvils and Welders
Joined
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5,034 Posts
Very well thought out and put together.

Myself, I would concentrate on solar and propane for energy needs along with wood for heat. As stated earlier, there are propane appliances on the market and i believe there is even a propane/electric fridge. That would sure open up options.

When you replace the wooden door with a steel one, make sure to beef up the framing and doorjam as much as possible.

Very nice job.

Tex
 
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