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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am new and thus I am probably asking stupid questions that have already been answered.

1. How do the united cutlery versions of the rambo movie knives compared in quality to the newer master cutlery versions?

2. I know that these are not ideal for survival because they are not full one peice blade through handle design but are their any other disadvantages of these knives (focusing on the first two) for survival/wilderness use?
 

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Couldn't tell you as this is the first I ever heard about them or if I did paid any attention to them.

I can't find out anything at their site Master Cutlery since you have to have a password to check on anything but pictures of the knives since they are a wholesaler.

Checking with some dealer sites I see that the prices are in the $110 to $150 range for the various four models but most come with certificates of authenticity signed by John Rambo himself...If they are anything like the United, and they probably are, then they are collectible trash, wall hangers at best...Probably, just took over the marketing rights from United and used the same cutler to produce them.

I thought that United stopped making the Rambo series and their Gil Hibben section only covers the Hibben III Fighter and the Hibben IV Combat Machete (that he designed) both selling at the same prices as above.

The only hollow handled knives that I trust are the ones made by Chris Reeve (now discontinued) and Randall Made Knives Model 18 but even so the amount of stuff you can carry is negligible...They sell for around $300 and $380 respectively.

You can always tape a one or two lozenge metal container(s) to your sheath stuffed a lot fuller with a lot more useful items.

The ones you see advertised for $39.95 are pure unmitigated junk and you can buy them, minus the "survival kit" for ten for $25 on E-Bay.

You can always use the search function on the bar to check for topics and this one had been covered many times--if you look at the bottom of your post, you'll see five links to previous threads dealing with this subject, albeit, minus the Master Cutlery angle.
 

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"eleutheromaniac"
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On a more serious note, and in an effort to be helpful. No knife, and no firearm will compensate for a lack of wilderness experience. Forget about survival knives, and start camping, trekking, spending time in the wilderness, you will quickly learn what tools work, what tools are not needed. It will be scary at first, but the rewards of being at "One" with the wilderness is truly priceless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Now I really appreciate the advice 6.8SPC. That is something I plan on doing and makes alot of since. No substitute for experience. Also thank you for you comments SeekHer.
 

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Fair question, and welcome. Other disadvantages are:

1) The 420 steel is highly stain resistant, but will not hold an edge and is a bear to sharpen. If you like stainless, look for 440C or equivalent that is "stainless" but with high carbon. I myself prefer carbon steel blades of 1095.

2) The serrations are too large to be of use. And they are pointed in the wrong direction, so even if they worked they would cause you to expend more energy than necessary. They look cool, though.

3) The screw driver handles are virtually worthless as such since the large blade and handle preclude them being held and twisted around an axis, which is what a screw driver is supposed to do.

4) The main disadvantage is the high price being over $100. You can get a quality piece from many other makers, but it won't have the bells and whistles or the signed papers, but it will be sharp, hold an edge, and be sturdy.
 

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Another huge drawback of the 'Rambo' knives was the drastically abbreviated tang, which was necessary to accommodate the hollow handles. Those hollow handles, while minorly useful for small item storage, meant VERY weak knives overall, which often led to a serious, if not catastrophic failures in field use.

Go with a 4" to 6" solid hilt knife with either a rat-tail tang or full tang.

Carry your small gear in an Altoids tin in your pocket.
 

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Rambo knives, unless you buy the custom made ones direct from Hibben, are replica knives. They look kewl, but if you plan on using them for serious work you'll be disappointed in their poor performance.
 

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Sam Adams was right....
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I'm still trying to figure out how the "Certificate of authenticity, signed by John Rambo" ... could be real... since John Rambo never existed... :D:
 

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I actually just bought an Original First Blood knife which I believe it to be a Lile unmarked, un-numbered, because I did some research on them, and also to have boiught it at such a high price and researched it that it sold for an even much higher price, along with closely looking at the blade and also the heaviness of it leads me to believe that it just might me a Lile original. I know there were some that he made that were used for the First Blood movie as props and that just had Rambo or John Rambo etched on them. Plus the rep that I bought it from said that it was Not one of the cheaper Certified Copies, that this is an axctual Original First Blood knife. The blade pushes solidly up into the handle and looks to be either push tank or half tang even. In any event, the knife is a definite solid. Now for the people who said that a person would be laughed at and mocked if they were actually using and carrying this knife around: I have carried mine faithfully around and have used it continuously, and instead of people laughing, they Ooh and Ahh it and actually compliment me on its use. But also, I am sure that people would not be laughing if they had my First Blood knife sticking out of their ass! I don't think sarcastic comments would be made either. My late great Father was a retired Special Forces US Army military man who did several terms in Vietnam and also several terms in Korea. He taught me many survival skills and also taught me actual self defense, and not that hollywood Crane karate Kid crap. He taught me how to break a neck with very little ease. He taight me how to actually se a knife such as these for actual survival, and not the Hollywood crap either. People will tell you that the replicas and prop knives are crap because of the 420 steel. But Buck and Schrade and many other well known knife manufacturers have been using 420 J2 steel successfully in their knives for years. People tell you these knives are crap, and some of them are, especially the sorry ass ones from China. But they say this because the world is all about keeping up with the Joneses, and everyone thinks the only good knives like this are the ones that cost arms and legs, that people charge $600 and up for. Don't get me wrong, those are awesome knives. But you dopn't have to pay that kind of money to get a good solid First Blood or Rambo 2 replica. I know, because I use my First Blood knife all the time, and it hasn't failed me yet, at hunting or skinning or anything. It is truly solid. And besides, it is a very nice intimidator knife againts troublemaking losers! Well, enough said. Thanks for reading!
 

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I actually just bought an Original First Blood knife which I believe it to be a Lile unmarked, un-numbered, because I did some research on them, and also to have boiught it at such a high price and researched it that it sold for an even much higher price, along with closely looking at the blade and also the heaviness of it leads me to believe that it just might me a Lile original. I know there were some that he made that were used for the First Blood movie as props and that just had Rambo or John Rambo etched on them. Plus the rep that I bought it from said that it was Not one of the cheaper Certified Copies, that this is an axctual Original First Blood knife. The blade pushes solidly up into the handle and looks to be either push tank or half tang even. In any event, the knife is a definite solid. Now for the people who said that a person would be laughed at and mocked if they were actually using and carrying this knife around: I have carried mine faithfully around and have used it continuously, and instead of people laughing, they Ooh and Ahh it and actually compliment me on its use. But also, I am sure that people would not be laughing if they had my First Blood knife sticking out of their ass! I don't think sarcastic comments would be made either. My late great Father was a retired Special Forces US Army military man who did several terms in Vietnam and also several terms in Korea. He taught me many survival skills and also taught me actual self defense, and not that hollywood Crane karate Kid crap. He taught me how to break a neck with very little ease. He taight me how to actually se a knife such as these for actual survival, and not the Hollywood crap either. People will tell you that the replicas and prop knives are crap because of the 420 steel. But Buck and Schrade and many other well known knife manufacturers have been using 420 J2 steel successfully in their knives for years. People tell you these knives are crap, and some of them are, especially the sorry ass ones from China. But they say this because the world is all about keeping up with the Joneses, and everyone thinks the only good knives like this are the ones that cost arms and legs, that people charge $600 and up for. Don't get me wrong, those are awesome knives. But you dopn't have to pay that kind of money to get a good solid First Blood or Rambo 2 replica. I know, because I use my First Blood knife all the time, and it hasn't failed me yet, at hunting or skinning or anything. It is truly solid. And besides, it is a very nice intimidator knife againts troublemaking losers! Well, enough said. Thanks for reading!
Great first post!:thumb:
 

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Welcome!

This is a quite good site devoted to the custom Rambo knives
http://www.rambo-knife.com/
as is this one
http://www.cartertown.com/rambo1.htm

The new Lile (with the "I" dotted) First Blood is going for $3,500 made of course not by Jimmy who's been dead 20 years (May 5, 1991)...According to the Lile Collectors, Numbers 7 to 13 are accounted for marked LILE and the original unmarked 6 for Stallone are also all accounted for and one sold at auction a few years ago for some preposterous amount of money...The three prototypes submitted to Stallone are all accounted for so that leaves one of the knives marked #14 to #100 and those are going for fair piece of change as well (around $2K to $3K at auction)

The Jimmy made hollow handle survival knives (not Rambo) were selling for $600 to $800 then and twice to three times that price, at least, now.

I really hope you got the real thing and if you have then great find--wear well!

P.S. It isn't that the 400 steel series is bad steel it's the temper that companies like United or Master use is one of the major reasons that make the knives crap.

P.P.S. Paragraphs are your friend!
 

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a bayonet would serve you better than those rambo knives

me personaly I find you can get pretty much everything you ever could want to use a knife for with a 3-4 in fixed blade

that said since your seeming to want a tactical type knife id recomend lookin at sog knives



the seal team is about the size your lookin for 7 in blade but the seal pups are smaller versions and very high quality knives
 

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I go for a cheaper knife than most. Im very hard on knives. I opted for the Ontario AF survival knife. I jam it into the ground to ply out weeds in the lawn, hack branches off bushes, cut stuff, hammer stuff with the but cap and gernerally bully the heck out of this knife. It holds an edge well and is easy to sharpen after the day is up. I would love one of those fancy knives but Im afraid I wouldnt use it because of the price.
 

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a bayonet would serve you better than those rambo knives

me personally I find you can get pretty much everything you ever could want to use a knife for with a 3-4 in fixed blade

that said since your seeming to want a tactical type knife id recommend looking at sog knives
Bla! Maybe everything YOU do with a knife :D: or maybe in the kitchen, but not outdoors camped out for a month or so in an elk, fishing or mining camp. Not that you can't grind away at various task, I've seen plenty do that, but who wants too? I got better things to do out there. And sure you could also carry an axe and saw too, sometimes I do that myself, but then you aren't using the knife are you!

The big knives are at their best in an emergency, such as a horse cast and fouled in a pack saddle sliding down a hillside. The young wrangler was trying to cut the beast out with a Case Trapper and the drama was getting high, when Wack! Wack! Wack! and heavy wet manila rope and gear started falling away. I was cutting against the oak cross buck pack saddle, tangled in a heavy, wet canvas manty and almost cut the pack saddle though, but things were getting 'western' on us. There's a time to worry away at things and a time to get things done right now!

I spend quite a bit of the year working with various professional outdoorsman and they have quit teasing me about my 'Rambo' knife (it's actually a Busse) because they will have to put up or shut up! :D: It quickly goes to to 'get your wallet and your hatchet and we'll find out' who can get a fire going and cut wall tent poles firstest!

I think alot of the folks that berate big steel don't spend enough time outdoors to appreciate it, in many primitive cultures the only store bought thing they have is a big knife. A lot of it has to do with tradition too, in the mountain west the traditional 'personal' chopper is a hatchet.

It's all good with me I not dogmatic about it, woodcraft is just plain fun, which is why I spend so much time doing it!


Take care,
 

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Bla! Maybe everything YOU do with a knife :D: or maybe in the kitchen, but not outdoors camped out for a month or so in an elk, fishing or mining camp. Not that you can't grind away at various task, I've seen plenty do that, but who wants too? I got better things to do out there. And sure you could also carry an axe and saw too, sometimes I do that myself, but then you aren't using the knife are you!
I can promise you that I can do everything and more with less gear and still spend less energy than most folks and my kitchen has its own set of knives
The big knives are at their best in an emergency, such as a horse cast and fouled in a pack saddle sliding down a hillside. The young wrangler was trying to cut the beast out with a Case Trapper and the drama was getting high, when Wack! Wack! Wack! and heavy wet manila rope and gear started falling away. I was cutting against the oak cross buck pack saddle, tangled in a heavy, wet canvas manty and almost cut the pack saddle though, but things were getting 'western' on us. There's a time to worry away at things and a time to get things done right now!
see I said i prefer a fixed blade not a pocket knife while I have a case trtapper thats good for small things around the farm my edc knife is typically a puukko

This is a razor sharp knife for general use from a camping site to a hunting trip! Handle treated so it won't get slippery.
Handle: 4 1/2" Stained Birch & Reindeer Antler
Blade: length 4 1/8", width 13/16" High Carbon Steel (0.8%, 59 on Rockwell)


I spend quite a bit of the year working with various professional outdoorsman and they have quit teasing me about my 'Rambo' knife (it's actually a Busse) because they will have to put up or shut up! :D: It quickly goes to to 'get your wallet and your hatchet and we'll find out' who can get a fire going and cut wall tent poles firstest!
see I dont even need a knife to split wood kmost people who batton wood trying to get smaller pieces dont know how to simplify things
the biggest issue in getting a fire started is dry tinder esp if its raining but even the little fingerlings when wet are still usualy dry in the center I have a pouch similar to this one alwayse with a tobbaco pouch full of wood shavings a pencil sharpener and a larger taper tool that will shave down up to 1 in branches

so i dont even have to waste my time battoning wood with a big knife or hatchet

I think alot of the folks that berate big steel don't spend enough time outdoors to appreciate it, in many primitive cultures the only store bought thing they have is a big knife. A lot of it has to do with tradition too, in the mountain west the traditional 'personal' chopper is a hatchet.
I never berated a large knife I mearly am trying to steer the op away from getting some gimiky big knife that will break at were the ricasso meets the hilt under hard use
It's all good with me I not dogmatic about it, woodcraft is just plain fun, which is why I spend so much time doing it!


Take care,
Your either illiterate or daft.

If you read my post I informed the op than in my personal and profesional experience a smaller knife is most practical

But because he was looking for a larger knife i gave him a recomendation for a larger knife a seal team elite has a 7.24 in blade with an overall length of 12.3 inches and the smaller seal pup knife has a 4.75 in blade with 9 in overall length

I have used both these knives and they are very good just not my personal preference as far as style

To imply both directly and indirectly that I have not spent a considerable amout of time in the bush because I dont have some affinity for large blades that can do everything but nothing particularly well and somehow a big knife is a status of someone being a true woodsman is absurd and insulting

imean **** next week im going boar hunting with a spear with no dogs to hold it
and this fall moose and mtn lion hunting in montana

and i have played in jsut about every type of environment in the world with the exception of artic ones and been to every continent but austrailia and antartica

and as far as hunting im currently working on the north american 29

if that doesnt classify my as a semi professional outdoorsman I dont know what does

a bayonet would serve you better than those rambo knives

me personaly I find you can get pretty much everything you ever could want to use a knife for with a 3-4 in fixed blade
that said since your seeming to want a tactical type knife id recomend lookin at sog knives


the seal team is about the size your lookin for 7 in blade but the seal pups are smaller versions and very high quality knives
 

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I go for a cheaper knife than most. Im very hard on knives. I opted for the Ontario AF survival knife. I jam it into the ground to ply out weeds in the lawn, hack branches off bushes, cut stuff, hammer stuff with the but cap and gernerally bully the heck out of this knife. It holds an edge well and is easy to sharpen after the day is up. I would love one of those fancy knives but Im afraid I wouldnt use it because of the price.
That's good knife for the money. It ain't nylon, black, or tacti-cool. But it does work.
 

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Rambo Knives are much over rated!

That big toothy saw on the back would get caught in stuff all the time.

I good survival knife is a medium fixed blade or a machete (the original Rambo Knife & preferred weapon for insurrectionists).
 

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I have a Rambo4 knife.

It is one-piece full-tang.

I did some research and the guy was saying how these were done from a leaf-spring, 1/4" thick barstock.

What I got is actually only 1/4" on the back spine. And it was hollow-ground, so the edge was very weak.

I re-ground the edge to be 'saber ground' and it works much better.

It is better then most of my machetes for brush, though I use it mostly in our kitchen as a heavy cleaver.

I would prefer it to be honestly 1/4" leaf-spring though.
 
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