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When I was a kid we raised hogs on 5 acres with just 1 strand of hot wire. You put it at nose level, they lead with their nose. Dad made it hot enough that it left a mark when they touched it. They learned real quick not to go anywhere near that wire. They learned so good that he had hell at times trying to get them into new pasture because they knew where that boundary was and would not go past it. My dad done daily walk arounds just to make sure weeds weren't getting into it. I remember that wire real well myself because i'd go to step over it and I still swear to this day that thing would reach out and grab me, LOL. I can still feel that wire biting me. It was not fun and it would leave marks on my legs too. The only times we had hogs escape was when the wire went down to storms causing trees or limbs to fall on it. Which thankfully, wasn't all that often. But we never overwintered them, they always went to market in the fall and we would butcher a few for us and family members.
Did you guys keep sows year after year that were big enough to to not be able to go under the fence, and their piglets stayed near their moms and didn't get out? Or did you start each year with piglets, and the fence was really, really close to the ground?
 

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Wannabe Mountain Hermit
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Did you guys keep sows year after year that were big enough to to not be able to go under the fence, and their piglets stayed near their moms and didn't get out? Or did you start each year with piglets, and the fence was really, really close to the ground?
We'd buy young pigs who were just weaned and have the wire at about 4 to 5 inches and as they grew slowly raise it to just about a total of 6 to 8 inches. By that time they would be well trained
 

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GrowingFromScratch.com
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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Having raised an assortment of hogs before, my answer would be a resounding NO.
Fish and wildlife would have a field day with you if they discover your hogs got loose to destroy the environment and cause property damage for everyone nearby.
Have you ever tried to catch pigs that have gotten loose?? I have. It makes getting escaped cattle back in look easy.
And I will mention again: environmental damage, rooting is really not good for the ground, they can root up trees and such. There is a reason lots of folks are moving towards "no till" systems in their agriculture. Having pigs till for you is destructive and counterproductive.
I would just pen them up and feed them, seriously
Thanks. The question isn't wood lot or pen. Unless I lease or buy some additional land, pastured / penned isn't an option. The issue is I have two lots, one with oak / acorns, and one without. One within eyesight, one a separate lot from the homestead. My thought towards fencing was train to electric in a small pen initially as I've seen demonstrated/suggested in various videos. Then rotate them through paddocks which have electric fence. Ideally, the paddocks would be surrounded by a cattle panel / welded wire outer fence line. If a tree limb drops on the electric then they would still have to contend with the panel fencing. I don't know if I'll ever make this happen or not, but just brainstorming possible ways to use this land we're about to relocate to.
 
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Small scale CSA farming is something I'm interested in. Feeder pigs in the spring, processed in the fall. I believe more and more people are going to start turning to local farmers to buy their meats directly. There appears to be a coming globalist war on meat, so it might only be a couple of pigs for my own family.
In addition to the "war on meat" it is very difficult to buy non tampered with meat at at a store any more. Lots of meat has a brine injected into it. Anything ground has mechanically separated meat and pink slime added. Salmon are dyed so they look pink. Beef has chemicals added and maybe dyed to keep it red. Meat scraps are pressed together with glue and sold as regular meat without being marked as glued together. As meat grown in labs becomes cheaper that will probably cause all sorts of franken-foods that may be questionable.
 

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Thanks. The question isn't wood lot or pen. Unless I lease or buy some additional land, pastured / penned isn't an option. The issue is I have two lots, one with oak / acorns, and one without. One within eyesight, one a separate lot from the homestead. My thought towards fencing was train to electric in a small pen initially as I've seen demonstrated/suggested in various videos. Then rotate them through paddocks which have electric fence. Ideally, the paddocks would be surrounded by a cattle panel / welded wire outer fence line. If a tree limb drops on the electric then they would still have to contend with the panel fencing. I don't know if I'll ever make this happen or not, but just brainstorming possible ways to use this land we're about to relocate to.
Historically and today in Spain, pig fattened on acorns are prized for their flavor.
 

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GrowingFromScratch.com
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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Historically and today in Spain, pig fattened on acorns are prized for their flavor.
That and the woods are their natural environment, and it lets pig be pigs. A few years back, I purchased an online tutorial pack on how to raise chickens and pigs for profit in a small scale, regenerative farming model. The underlying sentiment I really like was the notion of "treat your animals well, let them live as naturally as they were designed for so they only have one bad day". I think that is a great way to respect the animals that provide for us. I think small scale agrarianism is the way God intended for us to live. These types of farming models are steps back in that direction.
 

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Hog panels, 3'x16', are (give er take) $25.00 each now. No sense in buying 4' (50" actual) for hogs, unless you plan to raise/get larger animals later on.
 

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GrowingFromScratch.com
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Discussion Starter · #28 · (Edited)
Hog panels, 3'x16', are (give er take) $25.00 each now. No sense in buying 4' (50" actual) for hogs, unless you plan to raise/get larger animals later on.
I find fencing terminology has various meanings to various people, so I'm probably not communicating what I mean properly. Logically, what you are referring to would more aptly describe a "panel". But it seems like I've also heard rolled welded wire like this referred to as cattle panel / hog panel. Regardless of terminology, this is what I mean to use for a perimeter fence to surround individual paddocks / pens with electric fencing. I would want bigger penned in areas than I could afford to surround with panels at $25 each, so I would opt for electric. Then surround the whole area with a more permanent welded or rolled wire. Again, I have zero experience, so maybe I'm talking out my backside here. Appreciate everyone chiming in.

 
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GrowingFromScratch.com
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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Thinking I might build this as well. Have done some cursory searches on FB marketplace, craigslist for feeders and drinkers, and not finding much. So DIY perhaps

 

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I find fencing terminology has various meanings to various people, so I'm probably not communicating what I mean properly. Logically, what you are referring to would more aptly describe a "panel". But it seems like I've also heard rolled welded wire like this referred to as cattle panel / hog panel. Regardless of terminology, this is what I mean to use for a perimeter fence to surround individual paddocks / pens with electric fencing. I would want bigger penned in areas than I could afford to surround with panels at $25 each, so I would opt for electric. Then surround the whole area with a more permanent welded or rolled wire. Again, I have zero experience, so maybe I'm talking out my backside here. Appreciate everyone chiming in.

Even rolled out fencing like that is expensive. Just the wire alone is $1 to $2 per foot(price depends on height, hole size and wire gauge). On the lower end that is about 1/2 the price of panels but the panels are much thicker wire. The type of wire in the video you linked to tends to sag very quickly and can be quite maintenance intensive to keep it up, tight, and in good shape.
 

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I don't think welded wire is any where near strong enough without the aid of a good hot wire. pigs like to lean , rub and lift on the fence, pic in post # 28 you put up is woven wire and much stronger than welded. panels are very stiff and 16' long making them easy to take down and move. I had a deer get in my welded wire enclosed garden and did a lot of damage to the fence in just a few seconds.
 

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These are hog panels, normal size is3'x16'. And wow....price is up....from Orschelins, which Tractor Supply has bought them out. Sad deal. Kids inherited the business and have now sold out.

There are other sizes for different uses. Cattle etc.

Most of these are 1/4" diameter steel rod electric arc'd together. Two end posts and a center post makes a strong fence.
Yes, higher than rolled wire. Unless you bury part of that rolled wire, hogs get hungry and they will root under and out.

Just starting out, I would make small lots, then expand as your needs change.
 

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These are hog panels, normal size is3'x16'. And wow....price is up....from Orschelins, which Tractor Supply has bought them out. Sad deal. Kids inherited the business and have now sold out.

There are other sizes for different uses. Cattle etc.

Most of these are 1/4" diameter steel rod electric arc'd together. Two end posts and a center post makes a strong fence.
Yes, higher than rolled wire. Unless you bury part of that rolled wire, hogs get hungry and they will root under and out.

Just starting out, I would make small lots, then expand as your needs change.
We call that field fencing.
I had a 200 pound boar break that. Of course he was breaking back in the pen cause he didn’t like the lessons rhe dogs were teaching about the repercussions of getting out. 🤣

Edit: it opened to field fencing first then opened to the panels next. 🤷🏼‍♂️
 

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I have hogs and the can tough on fencing and gates.

Before you start fencing do some research and do it right. Materials are not cheap and a fair amount of labor goes in putting it up.

My 2 cents regarding fencing in the context of containing hogs…..

Welded wire fencing is a worthless waste of time & $$$

Woven Field Fencing like pictured in “post #28” will work if installed correctly. That means proper braced posts at the corners, straight runs, and tightly streched. This becomes a permanent installation.

Hog Panel or Cattle panel can be installed with just wire tying them to T-posts. Does not need to be in straight runs. Can be taken down and materials reused.

Pros & Cons……
Hog or Cattle Panel is more expensive per foot than running Field Fence. But the panel is quicker easier to repair if a tree falls through it.

I have done both ways. Along straight clear property lines - Field Fencing. Snaking through the woods - Cattle panel.

Also regarding the you tube in post #28, I didn’t watch the video, but based on the picture don’t staple the fence to the tree. Three reasons off the top of my head, the staples won’t hold in the bark, the tree will grow around the wire so you won’t be able to re stretch the fence, and if you ever have to take a chainsaw to that tree….good luck. If you want to use a tree as a post, first nail a treated board to the tree, then secure the fence to the board.

Electric fencing is great for “cross fencing“ ie subdividing a pasture. But not suitable by itself for a primary perimeter fence.
 

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Just a short PSA (public service announcemen) / rant regarding hogs.

They are large powerful animals with a mouth full of teeth. Treat with respect and caution especially boars.

I have a boar that slashed a ram (had to put the ram down) over food. Another boar that gave a couple of sows nasty gashes over food. I have a friend of a friend that almost bled out from a slash from a boar.
I once got backed into a corner by a sow, fortunately my size 12 steel toe boot to her snot resolved our disagreement.

When a pig gets bored in their pen:

Wood Composite material Gas Grass Soil

Fence Wood Plant Mesh Working animal
 

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Just a short PSA (public service announcemen) / rant regarding hogs.

They are large powerful animals with a mouth full of teeth. Treat with respect and caution especially boars.

I have a boar that slashed a ram (had to put the ram down) over food. Another boar that gave a couple of sows nasty gashes over food. I have a friend of a friend that almost bled out from a slash from a boar.
I once got backed into a corner by a sow, fortunately my size 12 steel toe boot to her snot resolved our disagreement.

When a pig gets bored in their pen:

View attachment 439944
View attachment 439945
Yep.
Dogs bout only thing I found to teach them respect of fence line. But you also risk dog’s getting hurt bad.
Luckily mine didn’t get gashed too bad.
Got home. Hogs out. Got out threw hog panels.
Leave dogs in truck and get the hogs in. Had to fight the boar off charging mcouple of times, and the dogs saw it.

No sooner let the dogs out of truck and boar the was out again thinking he wanted to test his resolve on Mr. Ace.
Very soon after the boar literally busted through the fence to get back IN the pen.
Dogs so wound up took a bit to get them off.

10 minutes later still hadn’t fixed the fence and the boar still wasn’t about to try and get out again.
I’ve used electric fence but they can smell if it gets shorted out somewhere, and will walk right through it.
Picture after got put in his place. Figure posting vid of farm life reality get me banned.
Fence Plant Grass Wire fencing Boar
 

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Catch them at the fence eyeballing you and give them a test of the ol cattle prod.
2-3 three times of that will make them wary of the fencing/panels.

That's not to be mean, but is for control.
I won't have a boar here that I don't trust, nor a sow that gets mean as they age. The calm sows, just stay away during the pig raising thing.
Our Lab mix stays with me anytime I'm near the hogs, in or out of the pen. If she thinks a hog is to close, she'll warn them by nipping at them.

I need to be rounding up a couple more runts/mangies soon, so we can get one or 2 processed about Jan or Feb. Butcher apts times are 6-8 months out around here.
I pick them up from the Amish, the ones that contract their herds out. There are always some that won't pass the buyers inspection.
 
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GrowingFromScratch.com
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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
I don't think welded wire is any where near strong enough without the aid of a good hot wire. pigs like to lean , rub and lift on the fence, pic in post # 28 you put up is woven wire and much stronger than welded. panels are very stiff and 16' long making them easy to take down and move. I had a deer get in my welded wire enclosed garden and did a lot of damage to the fence in just a few seconds.
I believe you are right. I wasn't married to the idea of welded wire, it was just the option I have some experience with, that comes in a big, long roll.
 

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Padre in the woods
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Does is make much sense, is there much advantage, to raise pigs in the woods if the primary timber is pine?
They live fine in pine trees. The ones I deal with like shade. I would recommend dumping in a lot of wood shavings, like they make when they grind a tree stump. Some hogs will go after the tree roots, and kill the trees. Loose dirt also helps as well as an occasional spray of water. Large wooded and fenced areas should be routinely monitored, else they will go under the fence.

A modified fence charger doesn't hurt as well. Well, the hog might hurt.
 

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Red White and Blue
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They live fine in pine trees. The ones I deal with like shade. I would recommend dumping in a lot of wood shavings, like they make when they grind a tree stump. Some hogs will go after the tree roots, and kill the trees. Loose dirt also helps as well as an occasional spray of water. Large wooded and fenced areas should be routinely monitored, else they will go under the fence.

A modified fence charger doesn't hurt as well. Well, the hog might hurt.
what do they eat? pine nuts? bugs? mushrooms? is there enough vegetation to sustain them? I always thought pine forests were pretty barren places.
 
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