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Anyone know of a good link for a non expensive radio to put in my Faraday box? Also I have some motorola radios the police used, not sure what they use today, can those be reprogramed to be used?
 

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Oregon Survivalist
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the Baofeng UV5R is one of the more popular, accessorized and written about transceivers around, they are inexpensive with a lot of youtube videos and websites I bought mine (4) and accessories off of Amazon.
There is another brand similar but a bit more expensive; the Wouxun, that i have also seen used.
The Wouxun has the added benefit in that it is part 97 FCC compliant allowing more frequencies for those licensed to be (like public service agencies,SAR etc) to be programmed in legally). The Baofengs aren't part 97 compliant. If in doubt chech the radio chassis under the battery a FCC Part 97 compliant sticker will or won't be there....
Both will fill specific niches at need.
You might also look at a multiband scanner, citizen's band radios, FRS/GMRS with tones radios to your kits, I tend to stick with one manufacturer for my FRS' radios.
Hope this helps!
One of many and more models available certainly; Amazon.com : BaoFeng UV-5R Dual Band Two Way Radio (Black) : Frs Two Way Radios : Electronics
 

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Oregon Survivalist
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If you have surplus police radios you can obtain a business license(s) from the FCC for simplex or with a repeater duplex channels.(a lot more expensive but a lot more range operating from a fixed station.)
If you volunteer with CERT or a SAR unit you may be allowed to input certain local agencies frequencies to take advantage or their simplex and repeated duplex frequencies while supporting these organizations.
You might want to also add Clamshell battery cases for each of your radios allowing it use alkaline batteries as well as nicad's, NiMH, or Lithium-ion batteries. If you have an older radio the factory may not be supporting it and it is critical to obtain batteries so you can keep it operational (personal experience with a maxon...).
Checking with your local Motorola distributor, radio repair shop or the motorola site will offer insight into your options; http://www.motorolasolutions.com/en_us/products/two-way-radios.html
I also have personally used these folks for radio batteries i can't get from the factory; http://www.cutratebatteries.com/ you'll need the radio model number it is also under battery and labeled on the rado chassis.
hope this helps too!
 

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Definitely make sure you know how to use all these radios. Think about it. They're not like a pair of kid's/hunting two-way radios you buy for $20. These are all full programmable radios and will NOT be as easy as just "turning them all to channel 2" out of the box. You can eventually program them to be stupid simple, but it requires you knowing how to do that in the first place. It doesn't take a lot, except for a knowledgeable friend, a HAM club, or some good ol' research and passage of the amateur radio technician license exam.
 

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Shoot-Move-Communicate
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If your emphasis is "non expensive" and you don't care about quality or dependability at all, then the Baofeng's are popular. If you add the dependability factor in at all, then I would avoid them like the plague. You can get a used Yaesu/Vertex, ICOM, or Kenwood for a little bit more than the price of a new Baofeng, and you will get much more quality/dependability. Motorola's are great, but you are going to pay more for them. Before the Baofeng lovers can comment, yes there are a few B/F's that will be dependable, and there are some Yaesu/ICOM/Kenwoods that are not, but the average Baofeng is much less dependable than the others.
 

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If you have surplus police radios you can obtain a business license(s) from the FCC for simplex or with a repeater duplex channels.(a lot more expensive but a lot more range operating from a fixed station.)
If you volunteer with CERT or a SAR unit you may be allowed to input certain local agencies frequencies to take advantage or their simplex and repeated duplex frequencies while supporting these organizations.
You might want to also add Clamshell battery cases for each of your radios allowing it use alkaline batteries as well as nicad's, NiMH, or Lithium-ion batteries. If you have an older radio the factory may not be supporting it and it is critical to obtain batteries so you can keep it operational (personal experience with a maxon...).
Checking with your local Motorola distributor, radio repair shop or the motorola site will offer insight into your options; http://www.motorolasolutions.com/en_us/products/two-way-radios.html
I also have personally used these folks for radio batteries i can't get from the factory; http://www.cutratebatteries.com/ you'll need the radio model number it is also under battery and labeled on the rado chassis.
hope this helps too!
Not sure, but the police radios may not be usable due to the new narrow band regs. That might be why they aren't being used by police any more.
 

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Shoot-Move-Communicate
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZCDBsBuhmg

Please don't listen to the noise re: Baofeng reliability.

73
Fair enough, but you are arguing from the specific to the general. I believe in giving a person facts so they can make an informed decision. Here are people that have the unit:

http://www.eham.net/reviews/detail/10349

Considering all of the HAMS that I've talked to, I'm a little suprised that it even got a 3.9 out of 5, but most of them are happy. Hope this helps.
 

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Oregon Survivalist
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Not sure, but the police radios may not be usable due to the new narrow band regs. That might be why they aren't being used by police any more.
Fair point JD', narrow band requirements kicked in jan 2012. At that time my agency was able to narrow band all of of our kenwoods but not our maxons or a base transmitter. Again i'd recommend talking to your local radio shop to see whether the handhelds are salvageable.
 

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The Wouxun has the added benefit in that it is part 97 FCC compliant allowing more frequencies for those licensed to be (like public service agencies,SAR etc) to be programmed in legally). The Baofengs aren't part 97 compliant. If in doubt chech the radio chassis under the battery a FCC Part 97 compliant sticker will or won't be there....
Part 97 is the part of CFR Title 47 that allows ham radio. Radios are not required to be Part 97 certified or accepted, indeed I am not sure there is a certification process for ham radios, although there is a certification requirement and process for some amplifiers used in ham service. And yes, the Baofengs are Part 97 compliant, as are most radios made, they have no Part 97 sticker because none is required.

Do you maybe mean Part 90, or maybe Part 95(a) instead of Part 97?

I am not a lawyer, I do not play one on TV, and I admit I could easily be mistaken, but below is my take on it all.

It is true that some Wouxun radios are Part 90 certified, and have stickers to that affect. However, are these radios really Part 90 legal? Let's be clear, they have the sticker, and they are in the FCC database as Part 90 certified. On the surface, a no brainer, they are legal for Part 90.

But looking at how the radios may have received their Part 90 certification is interesting. They are NOT required to be tested by the FCC to be certificated. The maker can declare that the radios conform to the regulations, submit proof in the form of testing by a third part (prior to July 13, 2016 a party who does/did not have to be on any FCC approved list of testers), and the radios were certificated, without the FCC every touching / inspecting the equipment.

Why does this matter? Because these Wouxun (and a couple of other brands) do have Part 90 certification. And yet they have the ability to be front panel programmed. I believe this is a violation of Part 90, specifically 90.203.

How can a radio have an ability, right on the front panel, specifically prohibited for a service and still be certificated for that service? Declaration of Conformity is how, basically testing by a laboratory the maker selects, and pays, to confirm it is in compliance. And that is why those rules are set to change on July 13, 2016.

T!
 

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First , does the law change mean a change for the legality of the chicom ht's, wondering because it seems the world cant make it without them,LOL.
 

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Quixote
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Bussing

Side job's the main concern, if I can get it up. Amplify a sound system, would require an enormous amount of power. Wire wound audio transformers could use some looking into modifying the receiver.

:eek::
 

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Oregon Survivalist
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Part 97 is the part of CFR Title 47 that allows ham radio. Radios are not required to be Part 97 certified or accepted, indeed I am not sure there is a certification process for ham radios, although there is a certification requirement and process for some amplifiers used in ham service. And yes, the Baofengs are Part 97 compliant, as are most radios made, they have no Part 97 sticker because none is required.

Do you maybe mean Part 90, or maybe Part 95(a) instead of Part 97?


T!
Hello I had a chance to tear into one of small number of wouxun's today, First' is indeed right Part 90 compliant, thanks for the correction!
 

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The Hammer & Anvil
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Search around the forum.

You can do much better than Baofeng. And on that note, taking radios and putting them in a faraday cage, not knowing how to use them or even what they're capable of, is bad news.
I am with Hank here. Get a license. Get on air and practice. Can start out with us here on the SB HF net every week.
 

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First , does the law change mean a change for the legality of the chicom ht's, wondering because it seems the world cant make it without them,LOL.
Their legality in what regard? The rule change addresses how radio equipment is certificated (type accepted was the old term) for use in a specific radio service. It does not so much change any technical factors, but now requires that the lab doing the measurements / confirmation for certification be on a list of accepted providers. It changes who can do the certification / confirmation measurements for certification purposes.

In the past when such changes have happened the FCC typically grandfathered in existing radios. I have no idea if they will do that in this case.

Regardless, this rule change will not change the status of these radios for use in Part 97 service, this is ham radio service and it requires no Part certification. It could change the status of these radios with regards to sales, as they do have to be Part 15 certificated (essentially all electronics must be Part 15 compliant to be imported or offered for commercial sale).

What will likely be the results of this change is that future Chinese handhelds like this will no longer be Part 90 certificated (Part 90 is not ham radio, but other services, such as use by Police and Fire). It can be argued that despite the fact these radios were Part 90 certificated they were never legal to use in Part 90 service anyway, as they are clearly in violation of specific requirements defined in that Part (look at 90.203 and tell me how these are legal).

So, probably no change in availability, no change in legality to use for ham radio, and no future questionable legal use for Part 90 services.

T!
 
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