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Hermit on a Hilltop
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's been a while since I've posted around here, but I wanted to share my latest acquisitions. Bought a trio from a local breeder and looking forward to when they're old enough to make some babies. I still need to build them a nice hutch, but to be honest it's ridiculously cold out. They don't seem to mind hanging out in a divided brooder until then.



Anyone know a good rabbit recipe or have some experience to share? Do you find that they are more or less cost-efficient than chickens?
 

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Alone among sheeple
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I used to work on a rabbit farm.
The one tip I was given was occasionally go netting, catch a few live, get them inoculated, add them to your stock.
It don't matter what, bucks or does, variety makes for better meat.
 

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Too bad you don't live in central Florida. I have a very nice 3-hole rabbit cage set-up and ready for sale.

I also have a trio of NZ's and one doe was bred yesterday and the other one is due to kindle Saturday.

Guess if she has little ones, they might be ready around Easter. I can just see trying to feed my family the "Easter Bunny"!.....:)
 

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Hermit on a Hilltop
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The does are around 10 pounds right now; I figure I'll start breeding once they hit 11 or 12. The buck is younger and could use some growing time anyways. He'd look like a middle school kid trying to pick up an NFL cheerleader if I tossed them together right now. :D:

Guess if she has little ones, they might be ready around Easter. I can just see trying to feed my family the "Easter Bunny"!
I can't tell you how many acquaintances are currently treating me like I'm a lizard-person. They all get doofy grins on their faces when I mention I bought some rabbits...and then I have to explain why. The SO's niece and nephew are going to be particularly fun.
 

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patriarch
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I raise 25 cornish/rock broilers every two years for the freezer and also raise rabbits for the meat. The chicks are purchased and takes #50 +feed per week X 8 weeks. We mostly use them for dumplings and sliced breast meat for BBQ sandwiches. We pressure can the rabbit meat to use in BBQ, casseroles, salads, or anything stewed chicken is used for. Smells like "chicken of the sea" when you open the jar! Tame rabbit is all white meat, where as wild rabbit is all dark meat.
My opinion is the cost is about the same comparing chicken to rabbit. These costs can be cheaper if you raise your own feed. Tame rabbit is cholesterol free.

http://www.poultry.msstate.edu/extension/pdf/rabbit_production.pdf

I have a litter ready to butcher this weekend. They average 4.25 lbs each @ 8wks. California/ NewZeland cross.
 

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Blessed
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The best way to eat rabbit that usually tastes amazing is to cook it with Shake n Bake for pork. Just treat the meat like chicken tenders and wet it and then toss it around in a bag with Shake n Bake and bake it. At least right now that is.

I suggest anything that resembles a stew after SHTF. Just like the great depression, the more water/broth you have the less empty your belly feels at least.
 

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I often bone the meat out on my rabbits and then use it for stir fry dishes of one sort or another. I also like to Curry it or cook it as "Rabbit" Adobo. All three dishes are a great compliment to a bed of Jasmine Rice on a plate!
 

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It's been a while since I've posted around here, but I wanted to share my latest acquisitions. Bought a trio from a local breeder and looking forward to when they're old enough to make some babies. I still need to build them a nice hutch, but to be honest it's ridiculously cold out. They don't seem to mind hanging out in a divided brooder until then.



Anyone know a good rabbit recipe or have some experience to share? Do you find that they are more or less cost-efficient than chickens?
I haven't seen too many bad rabbit recipes. They taste good about any way you fix them. You can save a lot of money having the kids pick clover and weeds and stuff for them in the summer. Also any garden scraps you may have. Oddly enough mine loved the left over popcorn I used to feed them. You may also need to get them a salt block.
 

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patriarch
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Anyone (newbies) getting into raising rabbits for the meat and have never raised livestock, either hogs/cattle/goat/chickens/ or rabbits, let me remind you that after the hard work of getting them to the right size or weight, the process of slaughtering comes into play.
If you cannot handle blood or the killing process of an animal you have raised from babies, I recommend that you shy away from this endevor straight from the beginning. It is gruesome, blood squirting everywhere, skinning and guts to dispose of, then you remember this as your wife cooks this animal or at the kitchen table. No we're not a cult, sacrificing blood letting and all that stuff, its a rightous killing of one life for another.
The native peoples of this land only took that which was needed. We as farmers, homesteaders, and the raising of livestock , should also practice this tradition. Good luck with your adventure.
 

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Hermit on a Hilltop
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I haven't seen too many bad rabbit recipes. They taste good about any way you fix them. You can save a lot of money having the kids pick clover and weeds and stuff for them in the summer. Also any garden scraps you may have. Oddly enough mine loved the left over popcorn I used to feed them. You may also need to get them a salt block.
Once I get the hutch built I also plan to give them a small enclosure to graze in for a few hours a day. Anything to cut down on feed costs, which only look to go higher over the next year or two.

Anyone (newbies) getting into raising rabbits for the meat and have never raised livestock, either hogs/cattle/goat/chickens/ or rabbits, let me remind you that after the hard work of getting them to the right size or weight, the process of slaughtering comes into play.
If you cannot handle blood or the killing process of an animal you have raised from babies, I recommend that you shy away from this endevor straight from the beginning. It is gruesome, blood squirting everywhere, skinning and guts to dispose of, then you remember this as your wife cooks this animal or at the kitchen table. No we're not a cult, sacrificing blood letting and all that stuff, its a rightous killing of one life for another.
The native peoples of this land only took that which was needed. We as farmers, homesteaders, and the raising of livestock , should also practice this tradition. Good luck with your adventure.
So seconded. A lot of it is just practice and desensitization- I still dream about the first chicken I ever euthanized. The next one I killed was for food, which was at least easier to do. Nowadays, slaughtering is still a sobering experience but not something I lose sleep over. The only way to get past it is to draw a line between livestock and pets. If you can't do that, you won't make it as a farmer.

It does tend to make you unpopular around the types who think all food should come clean and pre-packaged from the store, though. Is that a good or bad thing?

I've learned, by the way, that rabbits are ridiculous harlots. All the ladies do is make eyes at the buck over their divider. I guess I'll have to set up some dates soon.
 

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We raised rabbits when i was a kid and sold them to the local grocer , that was before all your food had to be approved by the Government. Came home from school many days and had to build new housing for the little breeding machines . I learned at an early age not to get attached to you food , we had chickens, ducks, turkeys and rabbits and my uncle raised hogs. Didnt really bother me to slaughter them except the hogs ....never got used to the smell.
 
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