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Interesting article about how Whole Foods is testing the market for rabbit meat, and the protest that followed.

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/08/are-rabbits-pets-or-meat/378757/

Seems people are confused that rabbits were food before they were pets.

What I find disturbing about the article, people have enough free time to protest a grocery store. Maybe the protestors need a second job? Something to occupy their time.

I do not know if I would buy rabbit meat. More likely I would get my Ruger 10/22 or my shotgun and go get a wild rabbit.

Raising and selling rabbits is what the free market is about. There is a demand, so fill that demand and make some money.

The rabbits my wife and I have, they are not for eating. We use their manure for the garden. If it came down to it, sure I would eat the rabbits. I find it easier to eat a wild rabbit that I have no emotional connection to.
 

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I like rabbit meat. Don't find it very often for sale because of stuff like what Whole Foods is experiencing. They used to occasionally have it for a meal back when I was in the Navy though the majority of the rabbit I have eaten in my life was wild rabbit. It has been a long time since I had any.

Knowing Whole Foods it would have cost too much. I can't even afford to walk past one of their stores.
 

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I have lost count of how many rabbits we have. I know they have 4 pens 1 is 20X35 and the other 3 are 10 X 10 and they are full of them. We eat them and also use them for dog food plus sell the fur hides. We still like them and they are well taken care of but they multiply so fast you have to do something with them.
 

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When I was a youngster we raised rabbits and sold them to the butcher at the local grocery store . Only reason I quit doing it was it just got to be a hassle coming home from school every day and building more hutches. I had pet fish too but still like eating fish . These vegan nut jobs protest and want everyone to believe as they do .
 

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I raised rabbits for a while - for food and manure. They are great for both, and the fur is another bonus. I like that the manure can be used in the garden right away. You don't have to let it decompose first. Of course, rabbits are cute and cuddly (sort of) too. Once my oldest granddaughter asked me if I named them. I told her yes... that one you're petting is Stu (stew). :D: (she got it - she knows Grandpa's sense of humor) ;)
 

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You quit thinking of them as cute pets when you pick up a big buck and you are not wearing a shirt when he gets mad and decides to kick . You look like you got mauled by a bear. lol
 

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I would have to be real hungry to eat wild rabbit! I've raised a lot of rabbits in my years, never any pet rabbits. No pet pig, or a pet steer. Sorry, all I see are steaks! You can't fix stupid.
 

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I've had both. One guy I had litter box trained, and I would have had to be pretty hungry to have ate that one. The last ones I had were for food, and fertilizer. Got tired of taking care of them in the summer. There are plenty of 'wild' ones, grazing around the place, if I get hungry for rabbit, but only in the months that have a r in them.
 

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Rabbit is good food, incredibly bad pet. Makes a good coat though.

This is what I told my daughter when she wanted one as a pet. She got over it and agrees now. Rabbit and dumplings warms the soul.
 

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I can get rabbit here at the supermarket for about $30.

Which for you lot in the U.S is about $9 USD a pound.

Cost of a CCI std .22lr 14 cents.

Why the hell would you buy rabbit... next they'll be selling roadkill.
 

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Interestingly, I am disgusted by the idea of eating a dog. Not only because dog meat is not really something we are accustomed to eating because a dog can actually be a companion to you. In a dire situation you can rely on a dog, your pet dog would probably fight someone or something to save you. We have to admit that we never developed that kind of connection with the rabbit. I believe the real way to be in harmony with animals is to keep their original roles in our lives. Cats and dogs were companions from the beginning, they joined us to help us protect ourselves. I think it is unnatural to eat dogs or cats because that was not what they were meant for from the beginning. Hens, cattle and rabbits were food and they need to stay that way. That’s why I would disagree with these protesters.
I also have to add that I am totally against barbaric treatment of animals. I am referring to the stuff you see in footage from China etc. Live skinning of animals and similar stuff are downright cruelty and represents another way of disconnection from nature. I believe it is fully legitimate and even required for us to end the lives of animals to take what we need but we must pay all the attention not to torture them in the process. I am not on the side of the corporations that bind and torture animals in small cages and feed hormones to them for profit.
I think the line between natural and unnatural treatment of animals is pretty clear but I do not think the protesters of rabbit meat are aware of this line.
 

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Midwest Region history lesson.....

My Dad died 1975. (just to offer a reference date) And I was 11 yrs old when he died.

*I* had already raised over 1,000 rabbits.... by the time Dad died. Of course, I was involved in 4H and the likes. I *THOUGHT* all my rabbits were being sold to pet stores, and the like. (As an adult, I was told the truth)

Yeah... yeah.... there was a serious underground movement of rabbit meat! As an 11yr old kid, I HONESTLY thought all my beloved pets were being sold for other BELOVED pets.

<damn you dad>

Maybe the rules and regulations were more lax back then? I honestly don't know?

but once Dad died... Mom made sure to eliminate the rabbit business all together.
 

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The Asian Lady pictured in the article--Is she protesting? Or is she offering recipe advice?
 

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Rabbits are easier to raise & breed than chickens.

Had chickens for a long time, got tons of eggs but very few hatchlings from that.

Rabbits however, overproduced & stocked my freezer.

There cute & fuzzy & loveable but that doesn't mean I wont eat them.

Then again, I am not opposed to eating dog or cat either if needed. I just haven't needed to yet.
 

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To qualify, I raised Angora rabbits for their wool. At one time I had 40. It was a huge amount of work; yet Angora wool can go for $7.50 US per ounce. I sold my angoras (German) for $125 each.

I wanted to breed for fawn colored originally, which is a recessive gene, and not German. I thought I would use my culls for meat. I found I didn't have the chutzpah for the kill, plus I lived in town surrounded by people who might have turned me in for popping the rabbits in the back of the head with a pellet gun, and I couldn't make myself wring their necks.

From my research of years ago, it is my understanding that rabbit in the grocery store is so expensive because of a few reasons. One is that the demand fell off decades ago. Another is that regulations regarding selling processed rabbits became stricter, so only a few rabbit processing companies could remain in business. Individual sellers were/are operating on the wrong side of the law in most states.

Thus people raising meat rabbits have to take their rabbits to a pick-up point for authorized processing. As demand fell, the pick-up points became fewer, and like the wool market, it got to where gas cost more to take the product to the pick-up points than the pay-out for the product. Only people who live very close to pick-up points actually make a profit.

We had a house rabbit, a German doe named B'elanna. She was potty trained to pee in her cage, but, sigh, dropped little pellets anywhere. It was uncontrollable. She was a doll. The cats loved to sit on the sofa and swipe at her tail as she passed by. She loved holding and pets. If you leave them outside and don't fool with them, they can be pretty mean and bite the tar out of you. She wouldn't get off the carpet, which was a boon, and so only one room had to have the electric cords run through cord protectors (bunny proofing is harder is than baby proofing.) For years my arms bore the scars that rabbit breeders bear from handling young wool rabbits - sexing, grooming, Ivomectin medicine, etc.

Bunny poo is cold, and can be put in the garden daily without any curing. A tea for house plants can be made. It's wonderful. I wish I could find a local rabbit dealer.

As far as eating, I'll eat rabbits. They can be pets, but they can also be food.
 
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