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Still a damn Yankee
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Has anyone had any experience with raising rabbits while feeding them only vegetation found around your property? My thought is if it will be difficult to find store bought food for humans, it will most likely also be difficult to find store bought food for my rabbits. If you have any experience doing this, please share it with us. Thanks in advance.
 

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Ordinary Average Guy
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Rabbits can free range, if you can keep them separated from predators. They dig pretty well, so a chicken tractor like device would work as long as you put a mesh floor in it.
 

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I used to work in a grocery store part time. At the end of my shift I would go through the garbage and pick out all the produce and bread to feed to my rabbits. They seamed to be just as healthy as when fed rabbit pellets. I raised them in a open pen(colony) they had many young ones.
They pretty much ate everything except onions.
 

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I have been doing this. We feed them everything that grows in our yard, and safe plants I can forage locally. Mostly it's tall grass, miscellaneous weeds, dandelion greens (they LOVE this), and our garden scraps. I considered drying the greens as a type of hay, and while it is feasible, I would have to store a literal ton and I don't have room for that. We have a buck and several does. I have figured out that when feeding fresh food, to offer it several times a day and as much as they will eat. The protein content is lower than the pellets so they need more greens than they would hay and pellets. The rabbits haven't had any tummy troubles since we started doing this. I did recently have to switch back to pellets due to time constraints as it does take time to gather a bucket of greens everyday. We were feeding about half a five gallon bucket, packed down a day. I do try and give them greens whenever possible now, and they always prefer it over the pellets. When we finally move to our farm, I will be constructing a wheatgrass growing area as I think it would be so easy and cheap to feed that way rather than collecting local stuff. The wheatgrass can be grown in plastic storage containers on a shelf! No need to store hay if feeding wheatgrass either as it can be grown year round. Just my experience.
 

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When we had rabbits, they had 2/3 of their diet from my yard and garden. As stated before, you will have to feed more often. If you have kudzu growing anywhere, it is a favorite as are mustard greens, sunflower leaves, carrot tops and radish tops. They didn't care for carrot roots though.
 
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