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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Seems like there's never ending discussion on this subject so I checked in with Chinook's Director of Product Development. Here's what he had to say about the advantages and benefits of both, and how they're different.

Quikclot, QC Advantages
- Huge choice of options for many levels of health care providers and first responders

Combat Gauze, Z-fold (non-military use)
- Requires minimum 1st aid training

ACS+
- Convenient 100g sponge, for moderate to severe bleeding
- Requires minimum 1st aid training
- QC – 1st response – available in three sizes (25g x 5; 50g x 3; 100g)
- Requires minimum 1st aid training

QC Sport Silver – available in 2 sizes (50g and 25g)

- Essentially the same as QC 1st response with a antimicrobial silver added
- OTCs (medicines that are available to consumers without a prescription)

QC Sport – available in 2 sizes (50g and 25g)
- OTCs
- Some military-only options are available as well
- Some prefer the Pad, gauze or sponge; compared to the granular form on some Celox types

The new Zeolite formula has superior blood clotting abilities and generates a significantly less exothermic reaction than the previous formulas
- QC of old did produce heat (big negative), but newer products do not.

Most of the disadvantages of QC have been addressed over the years and have been fixed
- Heat – no longer an issue
- Granules breaking off and creating a possible blood clot – no longer an issue due to gauze/sponge format

Celox (advantages):
- Very effective at stopping high-volume arterial bleeds to superficial wounds – some studies show 100% vs. 95% compared to QC
- Chitosan derived formula – which is natural and completely safe
- Extremely fast and effective at clotting blood, ~ <1 min via gelled mass
- No known side effects
- Works very well if the blood is cold (high altitude) from 98.7F – 65.4F
- Also works with heparinized blood, b/c it works independently of other blood clotting factors
- Has a variety of sizes (not as many as QC)

Celox Trauma Gauze can also be used as a burn dressing. When soaked with water the gauze turns to a gel-like consistency and protect 1st and 2nd degree burns. Actually very cool added benefit!

With all that said – none of the advantages mean anything if you are NOT TRAINED TO USE THEM PROPERLY!

Both bandages are highly effective and both are recommended by the TCCC. So train with them and see which one you prefer.
 

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Prov 3:18
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Glad you mentioned that Celox works without clotting factors,where as the quickclot initiates a "clotting cascade" using the body's own clotting factors.

Those of you who are on blood thinning drugs ,like coumadin , or have some bleeding disorder(on chemo,leukemia,etc) would do well to understand the difference in how these two work .Celox may work in some situations that quickclot wouldn't.
 

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didnt they stop issuing quik clot because it would sometimes actually cause burns to the wound? and also they came up with combat gauze with the kaolin
 

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Gunner
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From what I understand they are now issuing quick clot again with the newer non burning formula. I know that they also sell quick clot at Wal-Mart and we used it once and it didn’t burn, it stung a bit, but no burns.
 

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Went through TCCC in June. QuickClot "Combat Gauze" is the only hemostatic agent they recommend. Was told to completely avoid powdered or sponge products.
 
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