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Hail to the King, Baby
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I am looking at a couple of pieces of kit I have no experience with, and am hoping people here can shed some light.

The first one is the Self Reliance Outfitters stainless steel canteen. I don't have titanium money, so stainless is where it will be at. Does anyone have experience with this canteen? I will be getting the entire system if I jump, so anyone who has used the stove and cup also would be helpful.

(and YES, I know he fluffed his resume for dual survivor, I DON'T CARE. All I am looking after is the quality of the gear.)

The second one is the wool Patu blanket from Afghanistan. A Sergeant in my last unit kept one in his BOB, said it was warmer than a Woobie (bold statement).

I know that 100% wool is the magic number for warmth, and they are. the non-knockoffs are 46" by 96". Fair bit of fabric, but that's ALL I know. Anyone who used one before, had experience overseas (Astronomy, feel free to chime in whenever you like) with one, some feedback would be greatly appreciated.

Currently I am using an issue Woobie and poncho combo, with a sleeping bag zipper from Seattle Fabrics added to the Woobie, as well as the drawstring mod. I COULD do the Ranger Taco bit by adding a wool blanket and casualty blanket, but that gets heavy.

I am working with what I've got for the moment, and that means a lot of it is my old issued stuff.

thoughts and opinions?
 

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Psalm 34:4
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I don’t have either one so I can’t help but I’m interested in responses about the blanket so I’m posting this just so I can track the thread easier.

Better then a woobie? This I gotta know about.
 

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The first one is the Self Reliance Outfitters stainless steel canteen. I don't have titanium money, so stainless is where it will be at. Does anyone have experience with this canteen? I will be getting the entire system if I jump, so anyone who has used the stove and cup also would be helpful.
I can't comment on the wool blanket other than I have handled a few of those Patu wool blankets and they are nice. I love wool, but outside of just short range, minimalist camping, I typically avoid them since they weigh too much and exponentially more when wet (and they take forever to dry out). They are best suited to cold/dry temps where you plan to use an open fire for cooking and warmth. It's a preference thing, but just figure out how much weight you can/want to carry and "weigh your options" so to speak when it comes to what type of insulation you need.

I've had the Pathfinder canteen kit for a while. It's solid, and a good investment. For the longest time, I used the NATO Pattern 58 canteen, top cup and nested with the Crusader (stainless steel) canteen cup. The Pathfinder version is a little heavier, but has some advantages. Yes, you can place the canteen over coals or hang over a fire to boil more water than just the cup. The cup is stout and a good size for a bowl of soup. I also like the wider mouth of the Pathfinder cup, but the NATO canteen has a pretty good mouth as well (both are much better than the USGI canteen).

The Pathfinder canteen kit is only as good as to how much you plan to use it. It's not cheap, but very functional. If you're just going to carry and drink water out of the canteen, it's a little overkill for them money and weight. If do a lot of boiling for water purification, it's a great option. If I'm using an open fire for cooking and purifying, I really like the option of having a metal container and nesting cup. The two just give you a lot more options and efficiency when cooking or boiling water. If you use the canteen over the fire a lot, do get the fish-spreader as it helps to hang and handle it. The handle on the canteen cup is excellent as well:











ROCK6
 

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reluctant sinner
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If I lost my GI canteen gear I would buy Dave's. I'm not tossing fully functional gear just to get a label. I scored two 40 oz stainless water bottles for like $8 each delivered (was posted in the deal of the day thread). The o-ring is the only non stainless part other than the removable harness, should have bought 10.

I don't do well with just a blanket as I tend to move around a lot when I sleep so a bag of some type is required. A thin, light easy to wash/dry liner along with dedicated sleep clothes and a goretex bivy. Hot water bottles extend the range.

I like Dave's design for the poncho and I'll build a knock off as soon as I get my china shoe patcher sewing machine fully operational.

I have a titanium cook set from A. was like $50. Very light, thin, no coatings - best feature it operate as a double boiler. Could be useful for making salves.
 

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I am looking at a couple of pieces of kit I have no experience with, and am hoping people here can shed some light.

The first one is the Self Reliance Outfitters stainless steel canteen. I don't have titanium money, so stainless is where it will be at. Does anyone have experience with this canteen? I will be getting the entire system if I jump, so anyone who has used the stove and cup also would be helpful.

(and YES, I know he fluffed his resume for dual survivor, I DON'T CARE. All I am looking after is the quality of the gear.)

The second one is the wool Patu blanket from Afghanistan. A Sergeant in my last unit kept one in his BOB, said it was warmer than a Woobie (bold statement).

I know that 100% wool is the magic number for warmth, and they are. the non-knockoffs are 46" by 96". Fair bit of fabric, but that's ALL I know. Anyone who used one before, had experience overseas (Astronomy, feel free to chime in whenever you like) with one, some feedback would be greatly appreciated.

Currently I am using an issue Woobie and poncho combo, with a sleeping bag zipper from Seattle Fabrics added to the Woobie, as well as the drawstring mod. I COULD do the Ranger Taco bit by adding a wool blanket and casualty blanket, but that gets heavy.

I am working with what I've got for the moment, and that means a lot of it is my old issued stuff.

thoughts and opinions?
I just still use my 2 old issue plastic canteens. Each one has a stainless canteen cup that you heat the water in. Ive never seen the need for the steel canteens. My wool blankets are bulkier and heavier than my poncho liner but are warmer so thats the trade off. Wiggys makes a few lamilite poncho liners that are suppose to be better than the issue ones. I dont have one but do have some other gear they make and it is good.
 

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if you don't want to spend titanium money then the SRO canteen set is pretty much the best stainless army-style canteen setup you can get

although having had both i will say titanium is very nice...

if you're willing to give up the ability to boil in the canteen (situation dictates), the oasis nalgene canteens are an upgrade over the standard army issue ones. they're also pretty cheap to buy and lighter than stainless.
 

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Hail to the King, Baby
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Discussion Starter #7
All right, I'll be the guinea pig on this one. Just ordered a Patu/Patoo blanket from the highest rated seller on fleabay that sells them. Twenty nine and shipping. Made in Afghanistan (maybe they'll send some complimentary hashishma along with it, LOL).

Shipping AIN'T gonna be quick, will get here between the 2nd and 20th of next month, one helluva range between dates.
 

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Hail to the King, Baby
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Discussion Starter #9
I keep a couple of bags of hamster cedar chips in the closet floor. Seems to be doing the trick so far as far as keeping moths at bay.
 

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Hail to the King, Baby
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Discussion Starter #11
All right, here we go as far as the Patu blanket goes:

Got it today, feels like wool weave, not scratchy, dimensions are about approximate to what was described. It is warm, and weight-wise, very light, less than two pounds, maybe less than a pound and a half.

Now, it is light-weight. I was expecting something SLIGHTLY thinner than a G.I. wool blanket, what I got was something about as thick as a heavy weight work shirt.

This IS a warm item, but NOT warmer than the Woobie, I'm afraid.

The GOOD news is that this is so lightweight you have a wool item light enough to pack with the woobie/poncho combination, instead of either/or.


The workmanship is very nice, as is the weave.
 

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Titanium is getting cheaper all the time. A titanium mug or pot is not all that much more expensive than stainless steel. If you're dead set on a canteen, a titanium version is still very expensive because very few companies make those.
 

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Museum Piece
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A wool blanket is one of the most important things you can own. We each have a coat made from one. Also have light weight alpaca blankets as throw over shawls.
Even when wet, they will keep you core body temp in check.
 

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Hail to the King, Baby
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Discussion Starter #15
Those look like phenomenally well made blankets, but my they ain't cheap.

Definitely will be acquiring one soon, though. I'm finding out that merino wool is where it's at.
 

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For those that haven’t tried merino wool I highly recommended it! It is probably the best of the commonly available warm fibers!

In my mountain climate merino wool tee shirts and boxer briefs can be worn 3 seasons and make a real difference in daily comfort on both ends of the spectrum! A little too warm or a little too cold both get evened out.

I noticed that the patu is about the same size as the sarong. Kind of interesting that they both evolved to the same size over divergent parts of the world.

I’ve traveled with a sarong for several years now and may have to try a patu for cooler climates. I first traveled with a sarong in the islands, but soon took it with me everywhere!

It makes a great sun/privacy screen, picnic blanket, nursing cover, changing table, sleeping baby wrap and has worked great to tie a sleeping baby to you while you hustle trains to subways to sidewalks in Manhattan! I hiked halfway across Central Park with the baby’s weight taken up by the sarong tied securely to me. Standing in Pen Station waiting for the train same deal all done with an easily packed, easily hand washed, hang to dry sarong!

SD
 

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For a short-term outing or something to keep in an emergency kit, hard to beat synthetics for weight and warmth.

If the duration is expected to be long-term; hard to beat wool for warmth, durability, hygiene, use around fire, and more.

Tremendous amount of variability in wool blanket construction too as you must consider the blanket's:

Bulk - overall mass and magnitude in 3 dimensions
Density - it's compactness, specifically it's weave
Fluff - how "downy" is material and its quality

For home or scenarios with no fire, give me loosely woven, heavy blanket with lots of fluff.

For the woods and when I can use with a fire as not quite as warm, I like the military wool blankets as they are tightly woven for durability and don't pick up a ton of debris.

Wool blankets can be turned into a durable backpack too adding to their versatility.

Canteens - I like the Heavy Cover Titanium for my day pack, but still use the general issue stainless steel for cooking -- even at home, so much easier to cook and clean one item.

Be safe!
 

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Born 120 years too late.
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NOT KNOWING what kind of abuse, etc you have in mind for the canteens..
that said
I got tired of carrying empty canteens OUT of the woods at the end of the trail when plastic water bottles (as in the kind you crumple and throw away when empty)are so much easier to deal with. I still carry the aluminum canteen cup for cooking and such.

When doing my multiday hikes I carry already filled bottles instead of canteens. Then as I use water I can lighten the load, OR, save the bottle(s) to refill at the next water hole. I have actually been amazed at just how tough those little plastic things are. I had one come put of a pack and tumble down a slide area for well over 100 feet and it never spilled a drop.

Anyway when headed out it is just easier to crumple them up and carry out as you empty them and you don't have to worry about defunking the canteen at the end of the journey. I still have my canteens and if I am doing a fly in trip where things can get banged around I use them, but for being on foot I take light bottles over metal canteens for packing.
 

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but for being on foot I take light bottles over metal canteens for packing.
Agreed. Anything less than a couple weeks, if I foot, it's lightweight stuff. I have a small cooking pot, but for water use and transport, it's a hydration bladder and collapsible water containers (two for the filter, one for hauling good water if I need more). The SmartWater bottles have been pretty tough and the bottle just makes some tasks easier (like brushing your teeth or pouring water, or a filtered water reservoir).





The only time I mess with steel or titanium canteens/bottles is when playing minimalist.

ROCK6
 

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Agreed. Anything less than a couple weeks, if I foot, it's lightweight stuff. I have a small cooking pot, but for water use and transport, it's a hydration bladder and collapsible water containers (two for the filter, one for hauling good water if I need more). The SmartWater bottles have been pretty tough and the bottle just makes some tasks easier (like brushing your teeth or pouring water, or a filtered water reservoir).





The only time I mess with steel or titanium canteens/bottles is when playing minimalist.

ROCK6

I could never get the plastic after taste out of my camelback rig no matter how much I flushed or rinsed it out.
It worked, just tasted funny.
 
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