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Question on water during SHTF

5309 Views 29 Replies 19 Participants Last post by  Gankom
Past threads have emphasized the need for country folks to have generators to run their wells....but I have heard no mention about those living in the cities getting their water from huge wells run by the city. If SHTF, and all electricity is lost, including backup generators, people living in the city are as much up a creek as us living in the country for that matter. The size of generators it would take to run those giant wells in the city would need to be enormous. I don't see how they could keep that up very long.
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To be quite honest, I don't think that many people on the board consider a city a place to be in a shtf situation. To take that one step further, I don't think many people here really care what happens to the cities, so long as they stay the heck out of my BoL.

YMMV.

Wub
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Past threads have emphasized the need for country folks to have generators to run their wells....but I have heard no mention about those living in the cities getting their water from huge wells run by the city. If SHTF, and all electricity is lost, including backup generators, people living in the city are as much up a creek as us living in the country for that matter. The size of generators it would take to run those giant wells in the city would need to be enormous. I don't see how they could keep that up very long.
if you are in a city wtshtf you will probably not make it. move now.
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That is why it is imperative to have filters and water storage.
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You have to assume the water is done when the water towers are empty.

Most cities will likely have generators to provide water (I live in a small town and I've asked this question--we do have generators).

But then I asked the more important question: How much fuel do you have to run them?

Answer? About 12 hours of continuous operation.

Even if there are generators, the limiting factor is fuel. But either way, you need water independent of the local water system, or you need a bugout location.
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Yep.

I work for the Water Department. (largest one in my state) There's only 8 hours worth of water in our towers. Even with what generators we have there's only 1 days supply in reserve. After that power need to be back on or it all goes dry real fast.

That's how dependent we are on electricity.
Each city is different, but few can make it for very long without power. Without that power and water the cities become a madhouse quick.
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Yep.

I work for the Water Department. (largest one in my state) There's only 8 hours worth of water in our towers. Even with what generators we have there's only 1 days supply in reserve. After that power need to be back on or it all goes dry real fast.

That's how dependent we are on electricity.
Each city is different, but few can make it for very long without power. Without that power and water the cities become a madhouse quick.
That 8 hrs. of water would probably be gone in minutes when people get scared.
Yes, and the countryside soon turns into a war zone also when the mass exodus from the cities and towns starts.
A lot depends on the water source available. Some cities draw on surface water from streams, lakes and reservoirs; that would probably be more accessible than water from wells.

There is an additional complication in that many utilities only stock the chlorine they use to sterilize the water they pump in limited amounts, depending for more on constant resupply by trucks. And it is often only that chlorination that keeps the water safe to drink, as the water sources may not be the purest, and also because of contamination and leaks in the water system itself. So in a less than total SHTF situation where pumps keep working but trucks can't roll or supplies are spotty, the water may wind up needing boiling or filtering before you can drink it, anyway...
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I don't want this to be a complete thread hijack, but the idea of people leaving the city when water runs out is something I debated with someone a couple years ago.

I contended people would leave the cities in a direction where they thought they could find food.

My interlocutor thought they'd head toward water. What we had in mind was Milwaukee and Chicago, i.e., that large numbers of people would head toward Lake Michigan, and people would camp out there because the water was there.

I didn't agree, but the idea was so novel that...I just had to keep it as a a potential scenario. I still think most people will instinctively move toward food, but it's quite possible a notable number will seek water first.
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They may just head to the local zoo for the smorgasbord.
I don't want this to be a complete thread hijack, but the idea of people leaving the city when water runs out is something I debated with someone a couple years ago.

I contended people would leave the cities in a direction where they thought they could find food.

My interlocutor thought they'd head toward water. What we had in mind was Milwaukee and Chicago, i.e., that large numbers of people would head toward Lake Michigan, and people would camp out there because the water was there.

I didn't agree, but the idea was so novel that...I just had to keep it as a a potential scenario. I still think most people will instinctively move toward food, but it's quite possible a notable number will seek water first.
Interesting take. Certainly food for thought. I see it going both ways.
That is why it is imperative to have filters and water storage.
Someone with access to pond water what is the best filter to buy and keep for emergencies ?
I don't want this to be a complete thread hijack, but the idea of people leaving the city when water runs out is something I debated with someone a couple years ago.

I contended people would leave the cities in a direction where they thought they could find food.

My interlocutor thought they'd head toward water. What we had in mind was Milwaukee and Chicago, i.e., that large numbers of people would head toward Lake Michigan, and people would camp out there because the water was there.

I didn't agree, but the idea was so novel that...I just had to keep it as a a potential scenario. I still think most people will instinctively move toward food, but it's quite possible a notable number will seek water first.
Both are possibilities. My contention is foremost they'd just be thinking of getting out of the war zone. I'm not sure if either the source of food or water will give much weight. Probably they have friends or relatives outside the city they plan on getting to. Hoping that place will be better then where they currently are..

Kinda like the mass exodus from Manhattan post 9/11. Many had no bigger plan then to not be there anymore. Anyplace else had to be better. Same thing happens in war torn areas. Folks pack up what they can and just follow the crowd. usually they all end up together at some refugee type camp on a border. The neighboring country not allowing them to cross.

Even the Hoovervilles, or Obamaburbs (tent cities that have popped up) don't seem to follow much logic other then they're not being chased off that ground.
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Someone with access to pond water what is the best filter to buy and keep for emergencies ?
I recommend the Sawyer membrane filter.(maybe a post carbon filter too).
https://www.google.com/search?q=saw...HV89GBDw&sqi=2&ved=0CKIBEK0E&biw=1680&bih=986

For less then $100 you can make a viable system, using calcium hypochlorite, to make sufficient water for many years. Second choice would be one of the ceramic filters. (Berkey, Monolithic) There biggest problem is that each ceramic filter only makes about 1500-3000 gallons of potable water. Both still need some type of disinfectant.
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Both are possibilities. My contention is foremost they'd just be thinking of getting out of the war zone. I'm not sure if either the source of food or water will give much weight. Probably they have friends or relatives outside the city they plan on getting to. Hoping that place will be better then where they currently are..

Kinda like the mass exodus from Manhattan post 9/11. Many had no bigger plan then to not be there anymore. Anyplace else had to be better. Same thing happens in war torn areas. Folks pack up what they can and just follow the crowd. usually they all end up together at some refugee type camp on a border. The neighboring country not allowing them to cross.

Even the Hoovervilles, or Obamaburbs (tent cities that have popped up) don't seem to follow much logic other then they're not being chased off that ground.
My guess is that, initially, most people *won't* leave a city unless things become untenable. They'll wait for the government to do something first; only when pain sets in, or thirst, or hunger, will they consider moving.

I can't imagine having an EMP, say, and suddenly the roads are clogged with people walking out of the city.

People will be confused at first, seeking information, looking for help. I'd doubt that any more than 1 or 2 in a hundred would have their wits about them enough to recognize EMP for what it was, and to know what to do.

That 1-2 percent would be, of course, us.
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Even where I'm at I'd like to think I'm safer at home then on the road. And I live right along the northeast corridor. More of an overspill of Philly then anything else. It's very heavily populated. And very dependent on an infrastructure that can be crippled all to easily.

If the lights go out for more then couple days the majority of folks would be dumbstruck. Have it last a week and there would be chaos.

Granted my 'escape route' would be much like others, go west, since the river is east. North and south are just lots more people. you really don't have to go far west to get into the country. Farmland starts just 5-10 miles west of the megalopolis. The wife and I both have family on farms just 30-45 miles away.

Not sure how those folks would feel with millions coming their way. Probably not real happy. But if most leave here for there here might be a better place, for a while. If you've got a few preps.
Many cities rely on gravity to bring water in for example nyc water will travel unassisted to 6 flr
I think if you do live in a city you choose alternate exit strategy other than highways like water . I believe the term urban-survival is oxymoronic unless you resort to cannibalism . My plan would be to store enough water,food and ammo 22 cal long gun and handgun to make it to staging area to meet family and friends then to safe house properly stocked than to country retreat also generously stocked .What do you guys think?
A friend of mine recommened using pvc pipe and charcoal sandwiched between clean sand straining water first would this work?
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