Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 20 of 50 Posts

·
Prepared Gourmet
Joined
·
2,964 Posts
OK .. I am officially totally lost, John. Are you talking about Honeyflow?

ATST - I am sure you read their website (you linked it). It seemed to answer most of your questions - they will not be selling 'plans' as far as I can tell - they will be selling their super-flow frames and possibly the spout part. You would have to make your own hives but I don't think they deal in those (plans or otherwise). The 'price' will probably be revealed soon. They start their Kickstarter campaign on Monday (Feb 23rd) I gather.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
Honey is stored as reserve food for the bees and they need 50 lbs or more to get them through the winter. With this product, it looks as if honey flows from a tap, I don't think that will happen. Take a class or find a neighbor or friend that will show you some of what is involved, you may enjoy it immensely. I spend a lot of money feeding my bees sugar syrup but they pollinate for their keep. I will say that each set of bees cost about $100 and the hive box is over $100 and then you need a suit, a smoker and lots of sugar. So many hives die and you have to order more and try again. I wish it was easier, we really need more bees. Best of luck to you.
 

·
Prepared Gourmet
Joined
·
2,964 Posts
Zosimos - From what I read, it CAN and indeed has been happening. It is in the design of the frame inside - it is a special frame that the bees 'complete' and deposit their honey into but which can then be split apart from the outside (with a twist of a lever I think) so that the honey is directed down and out of the hive via a conduit. Did you read the site?

ATST will have to learn all about beekeeping etc too - and get hives. This is simply a honey collection system - it doesn't preclude any of that part.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,027 Posts
Find a local beekeeper after you get tested

Hubby knows I want to get into it, and he found a thing called Honey Flow. I am sure it's expensive, and I'm not sure if they are selling the plans or the whole thing. So what's your opinion?
Step one is to get tested for sensitivity to bee venom. If you're likely to overreact, beekeeping is a bad choice.

Second, get a local beekeeper to teach you the trade. You need to learn a lot before you buy your first queen: everything from the exact size of "bee space" to the ways to protect your back while moving bees around.

BTW, and this is just my opinion, I'd steer clear of any "magic" gadgets. Aristotle kept bees, so I think any magic would have been discovered a long time ago.

William Warren
 

·
Prepared Gourmet
Joined
·
2,964 Posts
ATST - I hope you come back soon and clarify what you intended this thread to talk about.

I thought you were interested in that new device you linked to (for the purposes of this thread) - no? I am just wondering why everyone seems to be giving general advice on beekeeping (or even getting into why NOT to beekeep .. haha) while I seem to be the only one who is trying to address what I thought was your real question. Am I the one out to lunch here? (could be! won't be the first time)
 

·
Crazy
Joined
·
5,609 Posts
OK .. I am officially totally lost, John. Are you talking about Honeyflow?

ATST - I am sure you read their website (you linked it). It seemed to answer most of your questions - they will not be selling 'plans' as far as I can tell - they will be selling their super-flow frames and possibly the spout part. You would have to make your own hives but I don't think they deal in those (plans or otherwise). The 'price' will probably be revealed soon. They start their Kickstarter campaign on Monday (Feb 23rd) I gather.
The bees fly away allot and you get nasty calls from neighbors
 

·
Survivor
Joined
·
3,426 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
ATST - I hope you come back soon and clarify what you intended this thread to talk about.

I thought you were interested in that new device you linked to (for the purposes of this thread) - no? I am just wondering why everyone seems to be giving general advice on beekeeping (or even getting into why NOT to beekeep .. haha) while I seem to be the only one who is trying to address what I thought was your real question. Am I the one out to lunch here? (could be! won't be the first time)
Everything everyone has said so far, is what I wanted to hear. Hubby hit me with this, asked me what I thought, and being me, I was skeptical, thinking it was a gimmick that wouldn't work as pictured [anyone ever try one of those "as seen in TV" products?]. I did read more about it after posting the link.

Anything anyone cares to post or speculate on this device or bee keeping in gerneral is appriciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,625 Posts
...
Anything anyone cares to post or speculate on this device or bee keeping in gerneral is appriciated.
It is going to be some kind of mechanical frame. It might work a few times, but over the long haul I expect it to be a huge liability. Regular frames and centrifugal extraction have worked quite well for a long time, that is what I'd go with.

Simple is less likely to fail.
 

·
off-grid organic farmer
Joined
·
24,535 Posts
You can manage a bee hive for the purpose of honey production. Or you can manage a bee hive for the purpose of honeybee survival. You can not do both. As they are each different styles, different processes.

I have no idea what is going on inside the OP hive.

I suspect you may have a difficult time getting your colony to survive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
My daughter wants to get into beekeeping. I was raised with it with my father doing the work with 2 hives. I'm not sure how long that gadget would last. In actuality, I would rather do it the old fashioned way, that way you still get the honey, plus you would have the wax for candles and other things as well.

With my dad, when he harvested, we would take the full combs and put in a pan on the stove and melted it all together. Let it cool and then start separating the wax from the honey. While the honey was going through a cheesecloth strainer, we would remelt the wax to finish get the impurities out of it, then used the wax for candles, waterproofing, sewing, and whatever else we could think of.
 

·
In Memory
Joined
·
10,934 Posts
You can manage a bee hive for the purpose of honey production. Of you can manage a bee hive for the purpose of honeybee survival. You can not do both. As they are each different styles, different processes.
I would think that pour spout hive gizmo would not allow the bee's to survive their 1st winter.

I'm keeping notes on the tidbits of wisdom FBK sets forth.

His advise above makes practical sense.

This spring I intend to start with two hives. I would think it would be best to let the bee's do their thing & not harvest their honey, at least for the 1st year, possibly two. Thinking that would be the learning curve period, then go to four hives & harvest from only two.
 

·
off-grid organic farmer
Joined
·
24,535 Posts
I did subscribe to their website, will be interested in seeing how they do it.

I would assume it requires a special made frames. But you would need to make sure they were only honey frames and not brood frames.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
48 Posts
First of all it looks like an awesome invention. If it works correctly and doesn't cost a whole lot, I'd give it a try. Like one other member said, I'd be worried about folks overusing it and not allowing the bees to build up their reserve to make it through winter. Also, I'm sure it is less stressful on the bees to not be opened up. However, I always enjoyed opening my hives from time to time. I truly believe that the bees get to know your smell and your behavior and know when it is and and when it is not the person that usually tends to them. Depending on cost, I'd be willing to split it with a member close to me and we could set up some sort of sharing of honey. I'm in the Shelby, NC area. Just a thought.
 
1 - 20 of 50 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top