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I've seen a lot of information about storage of grains, such as wheat, corn, rye, barley, rice, etc., so, what sources of protein would be involved in such food storage?

The average person requires 20%-35% of protein in their diet to remain healthy- how do you plan to provide yourself with that protein?
 

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I prep equal amounts of everything so when I run out of protein, I will be running out of other preps too. I don't live in the country so I can't grow my own. I prep canned meats which I can myself. Including chicken, tuna, beef, turkey, venison etc. I'm not into mechanically separated crap in some commercially canned foods.
 

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That's where the beans come in. You notice, anytime grains are mentioned in storage, so are beans.

When you combine legumes (beans) with grains, you get a mix of complimentary amino acids that make up a complete protein. Generally, the ratio is about 2.5-3 parts grain, to 1 part beans. So those of us who grew up eating a big bowl of beans with a small piece of cornbread or a biscuit on the side, actually have it backwards. The grain should be the main part of the meal.

They don't have to be mixed together, just eaten together. And there's evidence out there that says they don't even need to be eaten together in the same meal, just in the same day. I'm not sure I buy that part. But since they're commonly used together in so many different ways, it would be easy to eat them in the same meal.

Anyway, that'll provide the protein you need. But of course you still have fats and some other nutrients to worry about.
 

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Livin on the Edge
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Next 5lb jug of whey protein powder I order I'll check the label for an expiration date, I think most are 2-3 yrs. I usually get the Optimum Nutrition brand and it comes in up to 10lb bags or 5lb jugs. Each scoop has 31g of protein in it so around 120 calories. It can be mixed with water or milk. Chocolate flavor is best in water imo.
 

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Dried beans.

I have planted a whole lot of beans. They will produce a whole lot of beans. I will dry them and store them.

Plus dried beans that are several years old, will still sprout if planted. I have planted beans from regular grocery store beans and they grow just as good as ones sold as veggie seeds.

A good ole meal of red beans and rice with cornbread is very yummy, healthy and filling.

In the groc. store they are cheap and easy to buy a little at a time and store and after a while it adds up.

Oh and peanut butter is good too.
 

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corn, beans and rice eaten at the same meal combine to make a complete chain of the protein/enzymes that are most commonly found in meat. the 3 together can be used instead of meat. I have plenty of each stored, but also have a good store of canned and dried meats, egg products, and many people are planning to raise their own birds, livestock, fish, etc.

Chad, how rude! (LOL)
 

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Old Hounds Smell Good
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Yep..what all of them said.

Humans did most of their evolution without the use of meat as a regular part of their diet.

(I'm NOT a vegetarian so I'm not spouting something hoping to get people to not eat meat. Disclaimer over.)

We transitioned to opportunistic omnivores and that is, biologically, what we are now. It supports our big brain.

But lots of protein, from other sources than mammal meat, was our main staple for it. Legumes, as we know them now, were NOT a huge part of that until fairly recently in our evolutionary history. Once added, however, they seem to have played a huge role in the extension of our useful lives as the age and health (as seen in bones) began to really increase once added.

Chickpeas were a main intro there and our species as a whole probably owes a lot to it.

Fish and shore shellfish also played a major role and appear to have been one of our earliest animal based proteins.

For preps, I try to branch out as much as possible and hit all protein sources. If it is something I can grow again, big boost bonus that ups the amount I prep of it.

Beans with grits, beans with rice and cornbread, chili on cornbread or rice...all of those and hundreds more ways to cook that to get a full protein and tastiness too!
 

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quinoa, is a good protein source, if sprouted i believe its a complete protein source
goji berrys are a great protein source, about 20% protein by weight and full of vitamins and minerals, #1 chinese medicine herb
chia seed, is good in protein and high in omega 3/6(one of best in plant world for omega) good minerals and good for diabetics
micro algae like spirulina and chorella. they are earths best proteins sources. they are about 65% pure protein by weight and full of vitamins and minerals
and basic green vegetables have the basic amino acids your body can use to make protein, you just have to eat alot of it. and i mean alot(also for calories)
 

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I believe most nuts have a fairly high protein content.
They do, but they don't last well in storage.

corn, beans and rice eaten at the same meal combine to make a complete chain of the protein/enzymes that are most commonly found in meat. the 3 together can be used instead of meat.
You don't need corn and rice together. Any single grain will work. Whether it's wheat and beans, rice and beans, corn and beans, barley and beans, etc.

There are several amino acids that our bodies can't produce. These are called the essential amino acids. The limiting essential amino acid in grains is lysine, which the beans provide.

Same with beans, it doesn't take any particular ones. It can be pintos, split peas, lentils, or whatever.

If you take a look at the staple foods of many cultures, you will see this is quite common in their traditional diets. From typical bean and rice dishes, to tortillas and beans, bread or cornbread and beans, the corn and beans that the Indians ate, etc.

Dairy products will also supply lysine. Mac and cheese is a good protein source. As is cereal and milk, etc.
 

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Store what protien that you are willing to use.

I dislike dried beans, and so I have been buying canned chicken and fish. I just keep buying more and more, and using a little of it which keeps the meat rotated.
 

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Anyone?
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Meats provide the best quality protein in the smallest package,
plus niacin (important) and will supply your fats as well.

I store canned meats: Chicken, turkey, beef, stews, soups, chili, tuna, etc.
Cheap, easy and you can just pick up a few cans with each grocery trip you make.
 

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Growing up in the southwest, pinto beans were/are a main part of our diet. Then I find out that pinto beans are one of the highest in protein :)

Also adding lots of canned meats
 

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I include dehydrated whole eggs and egg whites. They are reconstituted for use in recipes that call for eggs, or to use as omelettes. So far here we are not allowed chickens in our yards. (The mayor veto the law the city council passed.) Rice and beans together provide you with a complete protein.
 

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Growing up in the southwest, pinto beans were/are a main part of our diet. Then I find out that pinto beans are one of the highest in protein :)

Also adding lots of canned meats
That's me too. Variety is hugely important. More so than many people realize. I'm storing a variety of grains, variety of beans, variety of dried and canned veggies, dried eggs, milk, etc. And most important, spices and seasonings. You can turn the same basic staple foods into cuisines from around the world with just minor changes in seasonings and techniques.

I have always eaten a lot of beans too, so that part was a natural for me. But I store canned meats also. As much as I like to cook beans and meats together now, I doubt I will during a SHTF, to make the proteins stretch farther.
 
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