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Global Survivalist
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I make one of these primitive travoys when I have to haul large amounts of debris for a shelter. For a simple debris hut, just picking up a load is fine but if you are making more of a long term shelter that will require a lot more debris.

The cool thing about one of these is that the two end tips are the only things that touch the ground minimizing friction. And if you are in a pine forest, it almost feels like the thing is on rollers. It helps if you place the load the farthest away from you. That way you are only dragging the load, but you are not carrying it if that makes sense. You can put one of these together in about an hour depending on the availability of materials.

Here is a video of me making this particular example: https://aspiringcaveman.com/making-a-primitive-travois-wheel-less-handcart-to-haul-bigger-loads/

 

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Nunquam Non Paratus
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Dude, put a wheel on it! Just kidding kind of. Knowing how to make a travois to carry an unexpected load such as an injured companion could be a vital skill. :thumb:
 

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CRAP CREEK SURVIVOR
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I make one of these primitive travoys when I have to haul large amounts of debris for a shelter. For a simple debris hut, just picking up a load is fine but if you are making more of a long term shelter that will require a lot more debris.

The cool thing about one of these is that the two end tips are the only things that touch the ground minimizing friction. And if you are in a pine forest, it almost feels like the thing is on rollers. It helps if you place the load the farthest away from you. That way you are only dragging the load, but you are not carrying it if that makes sense. You can put one of these together in about an hour depending on the availability of materials.

Here is a video of me making this particular example: https://aspiringcaveman.com/making-a-primitive-travois-wheel-less-handcart-to-haul-bigger-loads/



Nice! I've used something similar to what is in the picture in your post...and variations of it, including a child's plastic sled for hauling firewood and other cumbersome stuff. A travois is sometimes easier than using a wheelbarrow.

I really like how you wove the crosspieces into the travois instead of lashing them into place, which saves a ton of time and effort. Thanks for posting!

Nice website, too. Bookmarking this one!
 

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CRAP CREEK SURVIVOR
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You wouldn't get far trying to drag that through the woods here.
It's too wide.
Here, too!

By nature of the design, they are easily customizable. You can make them any size you want, and they will work well.
 

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Honyock
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You wouldn't get far trying to drag that through the woods here.
It's too wide.
Depends on where you are in the woods.
In far west North Carolina the large trees are far enough apart and canopy dense enough to keep it fairly clear at ground level. Of course you couldn't pull it up the side of the ridge >> than 45 degrees.

I actually used the idea just last week. Using cut limbs with green leaves with leaves turned down it pulls easy.
 

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Travois definitely work well but the points of contact groove deeper gouges in the soil as weight increases, unless at a very shallow angle. I use a piece of stiff plastic, shape it with a blow torch. Moved many thingd in many ways with it and others like it. Its not very primitive but it also literally slides loads over the ground.
 

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tump line in rough country,
takes some training to get the neck muscles strong but you can carry a sizeable load
Travois are useful. I like to take my Gomboy and bankline and half-lap the joints.
Tump lines were popularized by the Canadians in WW1 and into WW2. Later pack manufacturers realized what Native Americans and other 3rd World peoples had known for a long time, tump lines are very effective at carrying gear.
https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2017/08/tumplines/537306/
https://books.google.com/books?id=g...anadian tumplines&pg=PA55#v=onepage&q&f=false
Page 55
 

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They got this thing called a "bicycle" Lash an extention to the left handlebar and you can wear 20 lbs, and push 100 lbs on the bike thru some pretty bad terrain, pedal it on back roads, coast on it downhill in the desert short grass, etc, Amazon sells a springclamp that you can use to mount your rifle on the handlebars. Snatch it out of the clamp as you drop the bike and go prone, run for cover, etc.
 
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