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Careful of the quiet ones
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I haven't seen this thread, so if I am overlooking it and rehashing something I apologize in advance.


My concerns are about prepping while just renting a home. What I wonder about is doing the preparations, having supplies, water, food and growing my veggies.

If a situation happens and it is a SHTF scenario - more along the lines of serious economic downturn and rioting or earthquake (yes I live in So. Cal.) And if there is chaos, what happens if the owner pulls up since they live in the city and says - get out, we need the property - I am in a rural area.

I am a single woman and really out of everything that is my largest fear. I can handle a gun, hunt, camp, etc. But since I rent a place and not own I worry about being told to move out in the worse case scenario.

Banks aren't lending, already went down that road about three months ago and they said no. I can't see any other way to pick up any amount of land to move to.

Aside from the many people here that own their property, land and homes...are there any other renters, and if so what are the preparations they are doing. :xeye:
 

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I haven't seen this thread, so if I am overlooking it and rehashing something I apologize in advance.


My concerns are about prepping while just renting a home. What I wonder about is doing the preparations, having supplies, water, food and growing my veggies.

If a situation happens and it is a SHTF scenario - more along the lines of serious economic downturn and rioting or earthquake (yes I live in So. Cal.) And if there is chaos, what happens if the owner pulls up since they live in the city and says - get out, we need the property - I am in a rural area.

I am a single woman and really out of everything that is my largest fear. I can handle a gun, hunt, camp, etc. But since I rent a place and not own I worry about being told to move out in the worse case scenario.

Banks aren't lending, already went down that road about three months ago and they said no. I can't see any other way to pick up any amount of land to move to.

Aside from the many people here that own their property, land and homes...are there any other renters, and if so what are the preparations they are doing. :xeye:
Good question, thats one of my fears as well. The same could be said if you owe a mortgage on property. Who's to say the bank or government wouldn't foreclose. I believe something similar occurred to the farmers during the dust bowl, and again during the late 70's and early 80's.
 

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seek, locate, evaluate
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1. network socially- find a plan b for yourself- in your immediate geographical region

2. divorce yourself emotionally from your "home", the environment, because, yes, you may have to leave

3. live in a way that allows you to move quickly (because of point 1) in that:
-you have belongings you don't care about and can leave behind
-you have a few and simple supplies you can easily move in your truck quickly

4. don't RELY on growing food but storing food for one full growing cycle in case you have to relocate; have one year's supply of food and water that is ready to deploy in your truck and store seeds

5. besides a social network, cache supplies in your geographical region

6. LIVING with camping gear goes a long way to achieving the aforementioned points- for example, don't have a bed, but use a collapsable camping cot; don't have a dresser but use a Pelican container with wheels; don't have a sofa but use a collapsable camping chair; don't have a bookcase but use a computer with stored books on media and a solar charger; don't own a desktop but a laptop, etc.

7. invest in a military tent for protracted living- excellent shelter on a networked friend's land

8. make sure you have a vehicle that can haul everything you need to "jump" with- and make sure your belongings are trimmed down at all times to fit the vehicle

9. dispense of any pets unless they serve some form of utility


You are mobile, you know your inventory of personal belongings and can rate their importance, and you will adapt.
 

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I never wanted to be a land lord, but now I am.

We remolded an 1884 house from the ground up. Added insulation for the first time. All new wiring and plumbing.

We made an extra effort to add lots of pantry space and independent gas heaters in the event of a power outages - frequent here due to ice storms.

Will give my new tenants a light hearted lecture about stocking up a bit.

We'll see how this works out.

-bob
 

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Looking for a new Name
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There is a lot you can do actually. Not to the extent someone with 40 acres and a lake but you can do more than you think.

As far as prepping for food and supplies there should be nothing holding you back as a renter that a home owner could do. You can use a spare room or spare closet to put your preps in. Get a few of the Reliant 7 gallon water containers and stash them around the house.

Outside you could do container gardening, There are many useful sites on the Interwebs about how to grow herbs and vegetables out of pots on the porch. Just start here:
http://www.google.com/search?q=container+gardening

Just because you don't own dosen't mean you can't prep.:thumb:

BhmJeep

BTW, I am a renter as well....
 

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+1 on the container gardening for food.

If a big fear of yours is being unable to pay rent at some point or being told to leave, I would say that your BOB needs to be more extensive perhaps than most people's, especially on the shelter side of things. Remember this: in most state parks and in all national parks you can camp in "primitive areas" read: not in campgrounds for free, for typically 2-3 weeks at a time before you have to move. Then you could just move to a different site a few miles away. If its a full-on TEOTWAWKI SHTF, I'm not sure that's a particularly good idea, but short of that its not bad. But I wouldn't do it without a gun.
 
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Careful of the quiet ones
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
There is a lot you can do actually. Not to the extent someone with 40 acres and a lake but you can do more than you think.

As far as prepping for food and supplies there should be nothing holding you back as a renter that a home owner could do. You can use a spare room or spare closet to put your preps in. Get a few of the Reliant 7 gallon water containers and stash them around the house.

Outside you could do container gardening, There are many useful sites on the Interwebs about how to grow herbs and vegetables out of pots on the porch. Just start here:
http://www.google.com/search?q=container+gardening

Just because you don't own dosen't mean you can't prep.:thumb:

BhmJeep

BTW, I am a renter as well....
Thank you for reminding me of this. I have my whole garden in ground, but I could do more with containers as well. I was thinking about growing potatoes in bags, haven't tried it yet but looks interesting - my ground is very rocky here.
 

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Careful of the quiet ones
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
+1 on the container gardening for food.

If a big fear of yours is being unable to pay rent at some point or being told to leave, I would say that your BOB needs to be more extensive perhaps than most people's, especially on the shelter side of things. Remember this: in most state parks and in all national parks you can camp in "primitive areas" read: not in campgrounds for free, for typically 2-3 weeks at a time before you have to move. Then you could just move to a different site a few miles away. If its a full-on TEOTWAWKI SHTF, I'm not sure that's a particularly good idea, but short of that its not bad. But I wouldn't do it without a gun.
Well, I can cover the rent for a while if a scenario comes along and SHTF (of course I would have to be able to get to the bank; but that is something else)

My biggest fear is them pulling up and simply saying - Chaos is going on, we lost our other house in the city due to fire, earthquake or whatever...you need to get out, now...we need our house back. You now one of those situations where law enforcement is busy with life or death situations elsewhere and they certainly won't help me in a landlord tenant situation.

The most ridiculous thing is not being able to get a loan to purchase anything. In a "normal" economy it would be perfectly fine, but now even with a healthy bank account and credit score they just don't want to do it.

Funny you mention the primitive camping :D: I have a file with all of those things printed out ha ha ha. I suppose that in the worse case scenario that is where me, the truck and as many supplies as I can strap on will head - of course with the guns.
 

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+ 1 on the networking, even if it is just getting to know other gardeners. No one needs to know you are a prepper, just a grower!!!

BhmJeep
 

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Well, if you took the time to prep, obviously they didn't if they are trying to kick you out. You have a bargaining chip. You have the firearms, the food, the water, the tools, the seeds, and the knowledge.

Guess what... You not going anywhere they are going to need your help to make it. You have them come to that understanding. The fact is you won't last on your own, and they won't either. Its a mutually beneficial relationship.
 

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seek, locate, evaluate
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1. network socially- find a plan b for yourself- in your immediate geographical region

2. divorce yourself emotionally from your "home", the environment, because, yes, you may have to leave

3. live in a way that allows you to move quickly (because of point 1) in that:
-you have belongings you don't care about and can leave behind
-you have a few and simple supplies you can easily move in your truck quickly

4. don't RELY on growing food but storing food for one full growing cycle in case you have to relocate; have one year's supply of food and water that is ready to deploy in your truck and store seeds

5. besides a social network, cache supplies in your geographical region

6. LIVING with camping gear goes a long way to achieving the aforementioned points- for example, don't have a bed, but use a collapsable camping cot; don't have a dresser but use a Pelican container with wheels; don't have a sofa but use a collapsable camping chair; don't have a bookcase but use a computer with stored books on media and a solar charger; don't own a desktop but a laptop, etc.

7. invest in a military tent for protracted living- excellent shelter on a networked friend's land

8. make sure you have a vehicle that can haul everything you need to "jump" with- and make sure your belongings are trimmed down at all times to fit the vehicle

9. dispense of any pets unless they serve some form of utility


You are mobile, you know your inventory of personal belongings and can rate their importance, and you will adapt.
Evaluate your natural environment for NATURAL water sources. If you are in SOCAL you probably will find that water storage is going to be your most critical resource.
 

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Prepared Firebird
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1. network socially- find a plan b for yourself- in your immediate geographical region

2. divorce yourself emotionally from your "home", the environment, because, yes, you may have to leave

3. live in a way that allows you to move quickly (because of point 1) in that:
-you have belongings you don't care about and can leave behind
-you have a few and simple supplies you can easily move in your truck quickly

4. don't RELY on growing food but storing food for one full growing cycle in case you have to relocate; have one year's supply of food and water that is ready to deploy in your truck and store seeds

5. besides a social network, cache supplies in your geographical region

6. LIVING with camping gear goes a long way to achieving the aforementioned points- for example, don't have a bed, but use a collapsable camping cot; don't have a dresser but use a Pelican container with wheels; don't have a sofa but use a collapsable camping chair; don't have a bookcase but use a computer with stored books on media and a solar charger; don't own a desktop but a laptop, etc.

7. invest in a military tent for protracted living- excellent shelter on a networked friend's land

8. make sure you have a vehicle that can haul everything you need to "jump" with- and make sure your belongings are trimmed down at all times to fit the vehicle

9. dispense of any pets unless they serve some form of utility


You are mobile, you know your inventory of personal belongings and can rate their importance, and you will adapt.
********************

I agree with some of your suggestions. However......have you, personally, EVER tried to pack 365 gallon bottles of water (minimum requirement of a gallon per day per person) into your BOV???? And, if you have, how much room was left to pack anything else into the vehicle?? And, then, there is the one year supply of canned food, etc., too. And, what if someone needs supplies for more than one person??? What kind of "truck" are they supposed to buy for transport?? An 18-wheeler???

Also, not everyone is financially able to go out and purchase a laptop computer to bug out with. A good solar charger, Nook/Kindle, etc. aren't cheap supplies, either.

You are sending mixed messages. First, you advocate stockpiling a LOT of supplies. Then, you say just have "a few and simple supplies" that can be moved quickly. Which is it??? Can't be both.

Re using the camping equipment for home furnishings, I don't personally know anyone who wants to sleep on a camp cot every night in their own home. Or, have no choice other than a folding camp chair to use for seating.

Last, but not least.......advocating that people get rid of a cherished family pet to streamline their bug-out plan is very cold-hearted. Pets are a welcome source of companionship and comfort in the increasingly crazy world we live in. Many people regard their pets as family members, which they often are.
 

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Prepared Firebird
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+1 on the container gardening for food.

If a big fear of yours is being unable to pay rent at some point or being told to leave, I would say that your BOB needs to be more extensive perhaps than most people's, especially on the shelter side of things. Remember this: in most state parks and in all national parks you can camp in "primitive areas" read: not in campgrounds for free, for typically 2-3 weeks at a time before you have to move. Then you could just move to a different site a few miles away. If its a full-on TEOTWAWKI SHTF, I'm not sure that's a particularly good idea, but short of that its not bad. But I wouldn't do it without a gun.
****************

That suggestion to camp in primitive areas might not be the best survival idea you ever had. If things are anything like they already are here in Oregon, there are ALREADY bands of homeless thieves roaming at will in the parks and robbing people in campgrounds and in the wilderness areas.

And, yes, I do know people who are experienced campers who have experienced being robbed by these groups. Fortunately, the attacks didn't include raping any women and girls as an extra raiding "bonus". But the homeless bands of robbers were described to me as being a group of about 15-20 armed people who easily overwhelmed a single family camping out.

In one case, a family was attacked as soon as they arrived at the campground. Family consisted of Mom, Dad, and two teenage girls. Dad is an experienced gun owner, ex-military, and a very good marksman. He had a gun for defense, but the attack was so fast and vicious that he didn't even have a chance to get a single shot off.
 

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When I lived in So Cal and rented I had my garden in a containers, easy to pick up and move, five gallon buckets are cheap, and if you have to move you can take it all with you. If you don't want to use five gallon buckets, maybe one of those package deals from home depot that comes with the soil and some sort of prefab raised bed to grow crops in. My friend and her husband have one of those, they like it a lot. It's movable as well.

When we lived there and rented, family was our plan b, which really was our only option. Networking as a single woman or a couple is one thing, we had young children at the time. Have you a girlfriend or someone you can stay with in a pinch? Anyone with the prepper mindset like yourself that you can think of? Even a couple or someone with kids might be ok if you don't mind the little screamers. Your goal ought to be to find someone of like mind that you can band together with in an emergency.

Preps are movable. We had our EQ prep kit in a trash can. We moved it place to place no problem. Same with a lot of the gardening I did. I didn't use buckets as I had big nursery pots, but it's the same principle. Keep them all together in a close grouping so they shade each other like they would in a garden. You might need to water a bit more often but it's worth it. Everything else is whatever you think you need. May I point out that since you're a single person you can really travel light and live the same way.

All that aside, the owner still has to give you some sort of legal notice to move before you have to vacate, but maybe try to get a lease. It locks you in, but it locks them in too and this has saved us a time or two.
 

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Bravo Zulu
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I haven't seen this thread, so if I am overlooking it and rehashing something I apologize in advance.


My concerns are about prepping while just renting a home. What I wonder about is doing the preparations, having supplies, water, food and growing my veggies.

If a situation happens and it is a SHTF scenario - more along the lines of serious economic downturn and rioting or earthquake (yes I live in So. Cal.) And if there is chaos, what happens if the owner pulls up since they live in the city and says - get out, we need the property - I am in a rural area.
That's about the time that you find somewhere else to live.

Aside from the many people here that own their property, land and homes...are there any other renters, and if so what are the preparations they are doing. :xeye:
I rent, but my BOL is my parents' farm. My preps? I'm just starting on working up to more than a couple of months of food and other supplies. I bought 48 rolls of TP at Costco yesterday, so there's about 4-5 weeks there. I bought 20 cakes of soap, that's roughly 6 months worth there.
 

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Do you know your landlord ? If the shtf wouldn't it be beneficial for the landlord to keep you there to watch the property ? Even if the landlord needed the property , maybe you could make a deal to let you stay . You could help with cooking , cleaning , tending the garden , helping take care of kids if the landord has any , be an extra body for security , etc. .
I rent too . I store my stuff in plastic containers , buckets , koolers , bug out bags , etc. . I keep most of my preps in a pantry/closet in the kitchen . If I had to leave , having preps allready in containers and mostly in one spot would make it easier to pack my preps and go . Being in a small apt. makes it difficult to stock more than a few months supply of preps . If I had to leave in a hurry theres only so much I could take with me anyway . I'd probably have to leave behind my furniture , tv and computer too .
Container gardening is a good idea but if you had to leave and had no place else to go right away . How would you take the plants with you ?
I have family in the area that would probably beg to take me in if tshtf because they are helpless sheep with no preps and no way to protect themselves . But , I'd rather camp out or live in my truck .
Maddy quote "#9 - dispense of any pets" . NO WAY ! My dog comes with me no matter what !
 

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Its happening here already in the UK. People are setting up small communities in forestry places, just putting down a Teepee of the like and living together.

I would get a small amount of preps in and get keyed up on knowledge that you ofcourse carry with you.
 

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I have been a renter, in several properties, in the past three homes I have prepped. The fear that the landlord in a situation, what ever it may be, can pull the rug out from under you. For the most part the stock supplies have traveled with me from home to home, as well as a bulk of the container gardens, window boxes etc. Now the home the fiancee, child and I live is about 20 minutes from the city, back in the area where we both grew up in and well with in both of our parents homes. We have actually stepped up preps, now canning, making wines, growing and drying tobacco, we have both container garden, window boxes and since I am in a home with no yard use. I have taken a parcel of my mothers yard for a 18x8 garden. We store foods, as well as have supplies to "bug out" if need be. We are pretty well set, we are ever leaning new skills, and gaining a better ground against what may be down the road. So, yeah, we rent, have always, but that has not slowed down out progression.
Also we have a good friend whom lives out of state, two as a matter of fact in two separate areas of the coast, both survival minded. Social networking is a good idea especially being single.
We how ever are in the market to buy next year, and am looking forward to "owning" our own home.

So keep them preps going. Renting or not.
 

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To the surface!
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I rent. I have yet to own property. My plan is to work till retirement and then maybe buy property outside the metro area, that I would develop to serve as a first stage BOL for my kids. I have finally been able to move to their town and I could not have very easily done that if I had money sunk into a house back in the Seattle area, which I was just about to do three years ago when the housing bubble burst.

So, if you are like many people who need to live close enough to work that bugging in probably isn't desirable, then renting isn't bad. I wouldn't worry too much about being asked to move out in a SHTF situation, I don't see that happening unless where you live is really a desirable BOL, or you can't pay the rent. You should have at least 3 months of living expenses saved up, preferably one month's worth on hand without going to the bank.

Beyond that, this frees you up to buy a BOL far enough and in a more desirable location without it having to be your primary residence - even if it is just a bit of land with a gravel pad on it to park a trailer or stake out a tent. That assumes you can financially manage that.
 
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