Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Mother of One.
Joined
·
234 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys. I was hoping we could all share some tips about how we prep for our children, or help them to get into prepping.
 

·
Mother of One.
Joined
·
234 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
I have an 8 month old, and I'm working on better ways to prep for her, and to extend the amount of preps I have for her.

Currently I have about a two month supply of baby foods, cereal, and formula, to include some things she's not quite ready for. I have also a hand chopper and a blender to make my own baby food for her.

I buy my wipes and diapers in bulk, but have rarely bought the next size up in diapers. (She seems to go through them so fast!)

I buy clothes for her in the next 3 sizes when I see them on sale. I also have some sewing skills, and some extra fabric around. (I also wound up with tons of extra sheet sets, and figure a couple of well placed holes in a pillow cover will make for a super quick toddler dress if I'm ever in that big of a pinch.)

She's got tons of toys and other things that she can't use yet, or that will grow with her. (As a kid I refused to let my mom throw away my toys, saying I was saving them for -my- kid... I guess I was already a prepper. lol.)

Also, I have tons of books both fiction and non- about animals, the wilderness, and survival that are appropriate at different ages. (Wouldn't let my mom get rid of my books either!)

Should teotwawki not occur all that soon, I plan on going the whole Girl Scout/Ranger Rick/Family Camping route in elevating her interests. Most in my family believe in buying in bulk and finding sales on food for the specific purpose of saving money (rather than for prepping reasons). So, food storage will be a common thing for her to see. I'm also learning to can, make candles, quilt etc. so I hope we can enjoy those things together.

She's already been on her first camping trip, two months ago. She loved every minute of it, and it gave me a dry run on what to pack for 72 hours for her too. (Being a first time mom I ended up packing WAY too much btw! haha!)

-----------------------------

Okay, your turn!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,640 Posts
It's also important to consider the psychological aspects for kids (talking mainly about 5yo and up) in survival situations. They are usually quite adaptable, mainly because they're still developing their sense of the 'norm'. Probably the best thing you can do to help their morale is to give them a task that they can completely own and feel like they are contributing. I would recommend the fire. 1) it's an essential task, 2) they can stay busy gathering wood, kindling, etc, and 3) it's going to keep them in the general neighborhood of the camp.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
327 Posts
My kids are learning how to cook and the oldest is learning how to sew. They also know to check when supplies get low and let me know if we need to buy more. My youngest is a natural born "lookout" and lets me know the goings-on in the neighborhood (whether I need to know or not!)

I think one of the best things you can teach your child, besides basic survival skills, is simple obedience. My kids know if I tell them to do something, I expect them to do it immediately with no backtalk. They're not perfect about this, but we're working on it. In a crisis, you don't have time to stop and answer 20 questions "why should I (fill in the blank)?" Obedience could one day save their lives, especially if they are too young to comprehend exactly what is going on or why.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
I think you must hold on to nature. Just use the simple methods that have been around since the dawn of men. teach the boys to trap, hunt and construct. teach the girls sewing, cooking, foraging. many feminists will go blasitic about this statement, but in nature you must play by natures rules and not the lame ones that matter in our society. it's just a puzzle that fits perfectly together. the men have advantage with hunting, pure phisically. and so have the female with cooking and sewing. female's are way more precise and delicate then men, who always tend to be very rough. it's not that easy like, i want to able to do what you do, sometimes you just have to take on a role and the best way to take on a role is letting nature pick it out for you. it's smart to teach your girl how to light fire's, cause if she might get on her own, she's able to produce warmth. she can feed herself with foraging roots and berries and also she must be able to make a shelter. cause for every human applies three important things: shelter, food and water. after that, play the role youre assigned to. be a woman or a man. and its not degrading at all, if some female's will say. it's just doing what youre best in. a person simply cant be an allrounder in the wild. you really cant 'see and try, just for the heck of it'. certainty above all, self preservation above all, safety above all, and every risk as low as possible, THEN you'll have the best chance of survival.
things that every human must be able to:
-build a good shelter (really, its just knowing how)
-find water (distilleries, places to look)
-find food (can either be foraging or trapping)
last thing, good that they are very young, teach them there is nothing to be afraid of in the wild, just things to be cautious for and teach them they are perfectly capable of surviving in the wild. if they ever get into it at an older age, they will know, they can get themselves out... cause mommy allways said so.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
13,890 Posts
Hey guys. I was hoping we could all share some tips about how we prep for our children, or help them to get into prepping.
Hi Penny, this is a great concern for me, also.
As soon as she could walk, I started taking my little girl to the bush. She's now three and can identify deer, k9 and human tracks, which way they are going and an approximation of how many. She knows the first thing to do when she enters the bush is to remain still and quiet and spend the first several minutes observing, smelling and listening.
It's very important (I humbly opine) to make sure one's children are comfortable in the bush, and to teach them skills in a fun, playful manner.
You might want to put your child in a harness and spend as much time as you can enjoying the nearest forest and hiking trails. Not only does it acquaint your child spiritually and psycologically with the outdoors, it also has a calming effect on them.
Though baby clothes are expensive, you might want to buy an extra child's parka in earth tones, as well as other articles of clothing and include it in your BOB.
Another thing that is frequently overlooked is a gasmask. You can order quality Israeli childrens' gas masks over the net.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
268 Posts
I started training mine as soon as they were old enough to tag along , fire, shelter, tracking, shooting they are all capable of fending for themselves for the most part as I always thought what if something happened to me .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
679 Posts
We backcountry hike and camp quite a bit, and I feel that in addition to the shelter-making and water-seeking already mentioned, orientation skills are right up there among, if not topping the list of the most important of skills for them to acquire and get a good grasp of.

Even if you never camp, or expect to spend time in the wild, please teach your kids orientation, and equally important, what to do if they cannot get their bearings. This is a vital skill set.


I have always kept quality reading materials for the kids. Fortunately for me and my daughters, my son (at 13) is quite the manly type and enjoys hunting, skinning, sausage-making, etc. I honestly don't know what we'd do if he didn't, lots of veggies, fish and eggs I presume. I've relied heavily on books to teach him, as butchering just turns my stomach, and I've never done it well.

A story to share:
We once lived in a small cabin on a river in Kings Canyon Nat'l Forest, CA. Our back door opened to a huge rock patio. Each morning the rattlers would converge on the steps there to soak in the morning sun. When we first moved there, this just terrified me, as the children were still quite young. Since I was a single mom, I dealt with it. As morning ritual, I'd have some coffee, throw on my boots and grab the shovel. My job wasn't done until each one of the little bastards were beheaded.
About 2-3 weeks ago, some 8-10 years later and a thousand+ miles from that cabin, my daughter comes running into the garage, grabs the shovel and takes off.. WHOA there I say, what are you doing? Oh! her reply, we found a BIG snake!
Moral: Just be careful, that by example, you don't lead them to too much confidence in their ability to deal with things better left done by their parents [for now].
 

·
Will let you beg for food
Joined
·
793 Posts
My list that I have for my heathens is follows:
- homeschooling supplies
- arts and crafts supplies
- musical instruments
- books, books and more books some modern and all the classics (I have 15 bookcases full and they are floor to ceiling - i figure we can always burn them too if need be)
- all kids have clothes for the next 5 sizes, min 8 outfits each including footwear
- well designed backpacks
- whistles - i want to be able to find them if they get lost
- retractable dog leashes - sounds crazy but i will be strapping a harness and leash on my youngest, she wanders
- i have also bought a sweet 16 and 21st birthday gift for them in addition to a wedding gift - sounds strange i know but things will be bad and i want to give them something special on those days
- i have kept all baby clothes, toys etc - though i am not having anymore, i will have grandchildren one day God willing and these bits and pieces will come in handy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
My middle grandson loves to use my dehydrator. I let him cut up produce, put it on the trays, and let it dry. He really likes the cinnimon apples and jerky.

The four year old can scramble and cook eggs. He still needs a little supervision, but he does quit well with them for his age. We have to pull a chair up to the stove for him.
 

·
DIY RPG's
Joined
·
1,667 Posts
kyras 3 and she gathers the firewood gets water helps in the garden and catches fish
and wants to do everything daddy does

this is kyras first fish


and since daddy has a bug out vehicle kyra said daddy i need one too

and there it is i'm mounting an mp3 player to it next
the brake and headlights work great though
 

·
*** Forgives, I don't
Joined
·
1,369 Posts
"I think one of the best things you can teach your child, besides basic survival skills, is simple obedience. My kids know if I tell them to do something, I expect them to do it immediately with no backtalk. They're not perfect about this, but we're working on it. In a crisis, you don't have time to stop and answer 20 questions "why should I (fill in the blank)?" Obedience could one day save their lives, especially if they are too young to comprehend exactly what is going on or why".

Becka, You are the only one I have heard mention the most basic rule concerning a child, Simple Obedience - the one thing that could actually end up saving a life. So many People let their kids run rampant. In the woods or at the house kids should learn this skill!
 

·
*** Forgives, I don't
Joined
·
1,369 Posts
Hey guys. I was hoping we could all share some tips about how we prep for our children, or help them to get into prepping.
Hi Penny, You mentioned buying clothes for future use. As clothes for kids can be expensive, try yard sales and Goodwill for the extra.
 

·
Learning more each day
Joined
·
253 Posts
Take them camping as often as possible. Great skills can be learned on short weekend camping trips. Gathering wood, fat lighter, fire building, cooking on open flame, hiking, map reading, learning to relax outdoors with no tv, internet, playing games. learning to make do without the things you forgot for the trip. I think animal husbantry is great for kids teach them to raise chickens, rabbits, goats or other livestock. Teach them to cook, clean livestock or wild animals. Teach them how to store and preserve foods. If you work on these items all the time when the time comes that you have to do them they will come naturally and will reduce the stress level.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,822 Posts
All of my children are grown but I have a 10 year old granddaughter. Papa regularly takes her hunting. She has her own gun it's a 22 called a Cricket. She took the gun safety course and knows how to shoot and clean it.

She's learning to cook from scratch, sew, garden and other assorted home crafts.

We discuss everything in front of her regarding the political and economic atmosphere. She engages in discussions and we answer all of her questions. We include lots and lots of discussions on the Constitution. She knows and understands to a degree what is happening in our country, and understands that's why we have a garden and chickens and why we put up food.

Children understand much more than we give them credit for sometimes.
 

·
Will let you beg for food
Joined
·
793 Posts
All of my children are grown but I have a 10 year old granddaughter. Papa regularly takes her hunting. She has her own gun it's a 22 called a Cricket. She took the gun safety course and knows how to shoot and clean it.

She's learning to cook from scratch, sew, garden and other assorted home crafts.

We discuss everything in front of her regarding the political and economic atmosphere. She engages in discussions and we answer all of her questions. We include lots and lots of discussions on the Constitution. She knows and understands to a degree what is happening in our country, and understands that's why we have a garden and chickens and why we put up food.

Children understand much more than we give them credit for sometimes.
Actually I think sometimes kids are actually more intune because they are not distracted by day to day bs (job, bills, housework etc). My 6 yo asked my why the geese were leaving early this year and lo and behold they are heading out about 6 weeks early. Meaning harsh weather this winter for us. I also taught her to cloud read and her morning job is to check and predict the weather so she wear appropriate clothing to school...and kid you not she does better than the local weather man!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
Hi Penny, You mentioned buying clothes for future use. As clothes for kids can be expensive, try yard sales and Goodwill for the extra.
Better yet, go with Freecycle in your area. You can get some really great clothes for free. Save all your old stuff. Box each size/seaon/gender together for the next babies.

I use the summers to train each child in the next household tasks that they have become age appropriate for.

Older kids are doing a 4H shooting/archery club starting this year. We have done some rabbit raising and are looking to do some urban chicken ark/egg production soon. Get them involved in gardening and food storage. We do a lot of pick your own farm places and the older two are just starting to help me with the canning/freezing/drying process.

Get you little ones kneading the bread you bake. It actually is pretty easy and fun. The hardest thing is keeping them from becoming materialistic little American brat types. At least its hard for my public school mama friends. We homeschool so the pressure to have the latest toy and trendiest new clothes is just not an issue for the most part.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,228 Posts
since the authorities use schools and children to spy on you. since you cant hide it from the kids no matter how much you got just tell them its 3 weeks worth of food they will not know the differance. you really dont need your kids going to school and telling their friends that you got 3 years worth of food and the SHTF guess who will be knocking on your door? every parent your kid goes to school with. and what about them telling bob the friendly cop that comes to school ,that dad has 100's of guns and 100's of thousands of bullets!! what do you think he would do? or last weekend dad went out to our land out in the woods and barried several guns and bullets because we might need them one day!!!(doh!!) young children just dont know better, they cant help it so you need to watch what you say and do infront of them
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top