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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read over and over that before SHTF, be aware and seek out like minded preppers in my area. I've read thru many threads and may have missed it, but how should I go about putting together this very important part of my Families survival plan. I know as I've read that many aren't doing anything and many won't. They will depend on others to provide for them. I won't be one of those unfortunates.

I appreciate the helpfulness of this site to prepare for the definite coming financial crisis.
 

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Smile..wait for the flash
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Racking my brain over the same thing as well. I'm in a very small town (<5000) with lots of hunters and outdoors people. There has to be a handful into some prepping, just don't know how to find them without telling somebody that's not into it and they then think I'm a freak or tell everybody else.
 

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Deo iuvante
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The best thing I've seen so far is to plan for a "Community Building" group. Start with friends whom you know are like-minded. Like-minded may mean politically, religiously, or other. Tell them you want to form a group that will work to build community by working for shared goals, one of which is taking care of each other during emergencies/disasters. You don't have to tell anyone that you're a prepper or that that's the focus that you want. You'll need a core of interested people to start. You start with simple discussions with them, "What do you think of what the government is doing?" "How do you feel about the economy?" "What will we do if things get worse?"

If you find that you really are like-minded, then you can make some decisions about what you want the group to do. Do you want to focus on trying to change the local political climate? Do you want to do that plus make some plans for how your community will come together in the event of an emergency? If you want to move the group toward prepping, at some point you may want to say something like "We should make some plans about how we'd communicate during a disaster, especially if some of the more remote community members get cut off." or "We should have some kind of class every meeting where we teach a skill that people might think is useful for a disaster." Once you have something that you feel is a structured, common purpose then everyone invites the friends that they know whom they think would be interested and you can grow by word of mouth.

A lot of receptivity comes from perception. If you start out scaring people with "we need to prep for doomsday" or the coming civil war then a lot of people will tune out or just be leery that you're some kind of extreme militia. You're a community activist/organizer who just wants to makes things better for everyone. Present yourselves that way. Work preparedness into an overall theme of making the community better for everyone.

One thing that the recent preparedness expo in my area taught me, is that there are a lot more people than I thought who feel like something bad is coming down the road, and they were very interested in finding out what they could do to prepare.
 

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There are ways to do it and remain anonymous.

All you need to do is be creative.

For example, I often peruse prep items and such in stores and gun shops. When I see someone else doing the same, I strike up a conversation along the lines of "I was watching a show about earthquake preparations and thought I should get doing something about it. Any idea which of these is the best?"

I use different lines, and suggest different levels of experience, in each different case. Gives away nothing, but helps me figure out if someone is knowledgeable or not.

You can go on from there, or not, based on how things go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Good information! We'll start with these suggestions and websites. Any other info is welcome.
 

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Banned
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Gasoline --

Since the big flood -- every so often - I'll ask people if their doing anything for spare gas --- every single one said no :xeye:

I'm buying 5 gal. plastic cans every time I see them on sale -- I must have doubled my stores - so far :thumb:

Food --

Same thing -- no one on the sand bar has done anything :xeye:

We're still squirreling food away :thumb:
 

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Gandarra Homes
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There is a national program to do exactly what you want. It is called CERT
Community Emergency Response Training.


They will teach you everything you need to know about emergency response in your community, from how to conduct house to house searches, to how to determine if a house is condemned and indicating so, to co-ordinating survivors, emergency first aid, triage, organizing survivors into work teams, communications with fire, police, hospitals, the larger county and state CERT team. It is pretty amazing.

And you will undoubtedly find fellow preppers there.

Once you get CERT trained, though, you do have an obligation to respond to emergencies. However, you will be a leader, rather than a sheeple.

Good luck!
 

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Carefully listening to conversations in coffee shops and restaurants and other stores can pay off to some degree but that does''t build a relationship.
People are hesitant to get involved with a stranger very much, so it takes regular contact, even if you don't talk about prepping every time, they look at you and remember the previous conversations.
In the last several years, people I have been running into from the past are prepping on their own around here, and the gun shops have never done so well.
Ammo is finally showing up at Walmart except .22 of course.
Wether you are the catalyst or the nudge or a silent reminder those whom will prep do .
Like Christianity you can't save the world if they don't want any part of it.

There are a few that I thought might make good companions but they are not fully matured yet , they haven't come to the point that they believe they need to be a part of a group in order to survive.
It is understandable that people are cautious and paranoid a bit, especially those with something invested significantly.
It is almost predictable that some one anxious to connect, might not be well prepared.
So it's a significant risk but one worth taking from my OPV.
Some one that has not actually prepped might attempt to find and knock at your door . they are only an acquaintance not KIN. turn them away.
(should you compromise and let them in) They did not listen when they could have done something ,and when things are most critical the are not going to listen and take instruction then either.
Respect and trust is something that needs earned Before the event , because after word it is shallow.
Most folks are hesitant under the leadership of some one they don't actually know, and it's tough enough under those we do know.
Having a structure of behavior every one agrees to is about like living in a commune and to some degree it is exactly like living in a commune except the security is a much greater issue.
Food for thought
my .02 cents
 

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Armchair Prepper
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My opinion is that looking for a "prepping" community is the wrong approach.

I want to be part of a community that has prepping and resiliency built in. Some of the members of my community have different political, religious, and/or socio-economic mindsets. Some of them don't prep. Some can't. Some won't.

You can read post after post here at SB about people who can't even get their own families onboard. Some can't get their spouse to prep.

So, join a church, get involved in youth sports or theatre or your choice of after school activity. Be the person who shows up early to help set up. Be the person who stays late to clean up. Be the person with a truck and trailer, or slip $40 gas money to the person with a truck and trailer. Teach a continuing education class in your area of expertise. Volunteer at your library. Join a committee.

Show up. Track down and attend church dinners, plays, community events, and fundraisers. Take Red Cross, FEMA, and continuing ed classes on any topic you think might be interesting.

Start a garden and join a gardening club. Can food. Raise chickens, or rabbits, or goats - and meet other people who do. Buy veggies and eggs locally. Shop at a local co-op. Stop and chat with people you meet. Hunt. Fish. Gather wild edibles. Volunteer at the local food shelf. Prep for yourself and your family.

Buy a police scanner, and listen to local action. Put a CB or ham radio in your car. Subscribe to the local paper, listen to local public radio, pay attention to what is happening in your neighborhood. Volunteer.

After a while, you'll start recognizing some familiar faces. The same people, people like you, who show up early, get involved, and are willing to get their hands dirty. The people with a flashlight on their keychain, or a Leatherman on their belt, or a pair of gloves that are worn in. Those people are the start of your community, the kind of people who know that stuff doesn't just get done by magic elves.

When things go bad, or as things start getting bad, or as things start getting worse , you'll already be part of a resilient community.

Ace



In the 20+ years that I've owned my house, I've worked with my neighbors through power failures, 'block' parties, wind/hail storms, minor flooding, personal emergencies, pet sitting, bad renters, drug houses, blizzards, and other events that all fall short of TEOTWAWKI.

They know I've got a collection of coleman lanterns, stoves, and heaters that I've carefully restored and am happy to loan out.

They know that I've got a couple of rolls of 6-mil poly sheeting, staple guns, and other tools to cover broken windows.

They really know that I've got flashlights, and that I'm happy to GIVE them away during power failures.

They know that I'm willing to call them twice a year to remind them to change their smoke detector batteries, and will offer to do it for them and provide the batteries.

They know that I'm feuding with one neighbor over who gets out our snowblower/shovels/kids first to clear all the sidewalks.

They remember that time we all lost power for 4 days, and how those of us with generators and/or knowledge worked in shifts around the clock to keep fridges and freezers cold by loading gennys and cable onto trailers and moving from house to house.

They know that my wife keeps a deep pantry, and is always good for a cup of sugar, eggs, or other missing ingredients.

In short, they know that I'm prepared for most of the disasters that are likely to hit our area, and that I'm a resource.

They don't know about the root cellar full of long-term storage foods, or any of the other strange survivalist preps.

I'm ok with this level of sharing because I don't really believe that TEOTWAWKI is really going to happen. I also don't believe that my house will ever burn down (again), or that I'll get in a car accident, or that anything bad will ever actually happen to me.

So, I already prep with my neighbors - for the types of disasters that are most likely to happen. This gives me a good feel for who's going to be an asset when the zombies start hunting for brains, and who's most likely to disappoint those zombies because they don't have any.



Ace
 

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Capability, not scenarios
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Thanks for the discussion. This something a Newbie like me needs.
OK. Now for the other side of the coin.

There's a term known as OPSEC which stands for Operations or Operational Security. It means, in part, keeping your intentions, resources and capabilities confidential or secret, so others of a mind to do you harm won't know that you're vulnerable or a delicious target.

It is often very difficult for new preppers to not want to overtly seek out others of like mindsets. I certainly was that way--but to blab about one's intentions or worse, one's resources, is to potentially put a nice big target on your back.

Be very careful how you go about this, if you're going to go ahead with it. There are people whose plans revolve around knowing who's prepared and then taking their stuff. We call them "Raiders" and they generally aren't thought well of around here.

Even on these boards, you will find there are a few people whose prepping plans include taking what others have prepared. We don't endorse that--we endorse preparedness--but despite best intentions, you can see them here and there. Not a majority, but enough to be a concern, at least to me.

And note this: once you ring the "Look at me--I'm a prepper!" bell, you cannot unring it.

It's why some of us won't have deliveries from places like the LDS store, because the boxes of food show "Wheat" or "Rice" or "Beans" on the outside, announcing to the UPS man, your neighbors, anybody who sees it, that you have extra food. It's why Emergency Essentials allows you to request discrete packaging so it isn't clear to even the delivery man what's in it.

I've long understood the best way to survive is through community; I just don't know how to develop that ahead of time, without the concomitant risks associated with that approach.

Good luck--and be sure you know what you're doing.
 
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